What is your best experience in nursing?

  1. 4
    Did you have a day that was amazing? Was it a patient that made you feel like a million bucks? Did you witness someone else do something great? I always like to hear these stories because it reminds me why I got into nursing.
    Joe V, bell1962, NF_eyenurse, and 1 other like this.

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  2. 12 Comments...

  3. 6
    honestly - my best day was finding the co-workers on the Onc floor I now work on - that embraced me and started inviting me out for breakfast with them (even though I was only a float - but I did work down there frequently)...we're now very close and look to each other for advice and wisdom.
    Cal-Neva, bell1962, T.H.R.N., and 3 others like this.
  4. 3
    That's awesome that you were able to find that. It is a great feeling. Thanks for sharing!
    bell1962, T.H.R.N., and NF_eyenurse like this.
  5. 7
    Guess I should contribute. I have had quite a few memorable moments, but one that sticks out was when I worked in ICU. I took care of an elderly African American lady. It was clear that she was the loved matriarch of the family. Her entire family was there most of the time, even through the night to be with her and assist in any way they could with her care. I took care of her for three nights and each night she got better and stronger. By the third night she was off the ventilator. I will never forget the love and appreciation that she and her family showed me. It was one of those moments when you reaffirm the knowledge that you chose the right profession.
    Twinmom06, bell1962, T.H.R.N., and 4 others like this.
  6. 6
    I work in palliative.
    First time I got mentioned in a pts obit. Families don't always know how/think of saying thank you when their loved one is dying. It is just nice to know you are doing your job right.
    NF_eyenurse, Twinmom06, Cal-Neva, and 3 others like this.
  7. 5
    I have a few that I can think of off the top of my head.

    I loved it in the hospital when patients or their families were appreciative of the care I gave.

    One time, it felt good when I finally got a patient to walk the halls. He always said "later...." or had some kind of excuse to not walk. I made a deal with him to walk with him somewhere he had been wanting to go and he did it. It was five days of this man not wanting to do anything, with me or PT and then I was able to see him move around. It doesn't sound like a big deal now but at the time it was pretty cool. And I remember my manager filled out a positive comment card about it.

    I enjoy days when my coworkers and I work well as a team (which is often). It feels good when we are really busy and we just have this groove going on, no one needs to tell each other what we are thinking or what we need. We just know. I love that.
    Cal-Neva, bell1962, T.H.R.N., and 2 others like this.
  8. 5
    I have many; not just one...

    Whether it was giving an actively dying pt their last bath, confront and comfort pts that dispair and have anger and anxiety that eventually make strides holistically; to high five Pedi kids to my "residents" kids and family members, there's too many moments to count, honestly.

    The most moments I'll remember are receiving kids who have an aversion to eating, and are not meeting milestones to eating meals and taking that first walk, or speaking, walking, jumping, and having a increasing appetite develop into the wonderful personalities that they struggled so long to be due to medical fragility.

    I've help shaped lives through sweat, tears and laughter from cradle to grave, and they have helped shaped me as well.
    NF_eyenurse, Cal-Neva, bell1962, and 2 others like this.
  9. 9
    Been taking care of one particular kid since she came out of NICU completely vent-dependent, given one year to live with warnings that she would be delayed, deaf, and refused reconstructive surgery because it was considered futile. She has an extremely rare disorder affecting her jaw and ribs, and she was slapped with a "one size fits all" diagnosis based on limited understanding.

    I got to be the one to wean her off the vent, slap on the passy muir, watch her crawl, then cruise, then walk, celebrate her first birthday, teach her sign language, passed her hearing test with flying colors, be present at her evaluation where she was rated cognitively as above average (17 months old, performing many two-year old tasks), and observe doctor after doctor eat their words. Best day ever? When they approved her for reconstructive surgery, after which her trach and g-tube will eventually be removed (and she will be able to speak). It's very sad, because she will not need me anymore, but so freaking awesome because she'll be a normal kid with a normal future! I had only ever dealt with kids with very VERY poor outcomes. It's so fantastic to see someone beat the odds.
  10. 4
    Quote from nekozuki
    Been taking care of one particular kid since she came out of NICU completely vent-dependent, given one year to live with warnings that she would be delayed, deaf, and refused reconstructive surgery because it was considered futile. She has an extremely rare disorder affecting her jaw and ribs, and she was slapped with a "one size fits all" diagnosis based on limited understanding.
    Aww what a neat story! I have experienced similar patients seeing them as tiny NICU graduates t/v, gtube, difficult to wean off narcotics and benzos, miserable little things, have to bag them every time you touch them because they clamp down. And then they go home. And then they come back a year later with an infection, etc. and they are sitting up, playing, blowing kisses. Will never be at age level, always be very special needs, but obviously in better shape and an important part of their families.
    NF_eyenurse, Cal-Neva, bell1962, and 1 other like this.
  11. 9
    I was taking care of an elderly gentleman who was actively dying in the ICU. He did not want to be intubated but was requiring the Bipap mask at all times. He couldn't tolerate taking it off at all - not even for sips of water or PO meds. Throughout my shift he was becoming more lethargic and unable to communicate. His wife, who was in her 80s, stayed there the entire night with him. She was quietly knitting in the corner of the room... she didn't have many questions or requests...just a very pleasant woman especially considering the circumstances.

    At the end of my shift, I gave bedside report and the wife said, "Would you come back here before you leave for the day?" When I came back, she handed me a koozie/drink holder she had been knitting for me! She said, "Thank you for being so gentle with my husband. I've been worried I wouldn't get this finished before you left!" I know this seems so insignificant but it literally brought tears to my eyes. This woman's husband was dying, yet she was thinking of ME and making ME a gift?! That is true selflessness. I can't even express how eye-opening that little moment was. To me, it's more meaningful than any recognition or award I've ever received!

    I agree with Cal-Neva, just reflecting back on this situation reminds me why I'm a nurse.
    NF_eyenurse, Twinmom06, Debilpn23, and 6 others like this.


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