Nurses are #1 in Honesty/Ethics again - Gallop - page 3

by brian Admin

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Congratulations nurses, you did it again! Nurses Rock! 13 years in a row nurses are at the top of the charts! Nurses continue to outrank other professions in Gallup's annual Honesty and Ethics survey. This year, 85% of... Read More


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    Here is a requirement for a Case manager RN in a Local LTC- "Must have patience, tact, a cheerful disposition and enthusiasm, as well as the willingness to handle difficult residents."


    Forget Ethics. Hello Mary Poppins!!!!
    I do think this a a line direcly taken from Disney's movie- when the little girl tells her father what they are looking for in a Nanny and the letter goes up the chimney and along swoops down Juli Andrews!!! I have the video!!!!
    lindarn likes this.
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    Quote from echoRNC711
    Yikes, After reading these posts I am left wondering , doesn't anything make nurses happy??? (I can only imagine the wrath if we were at the bottom)

    Hearing we are #1 always lightens my heart. Maybe I walk around with blinkers on or rose colored glasses on but I do feel a pride both being an RN and that the public shares my sentiment that we as a nursing body are honorable and trustworthy. To me these traits are the marker of good character and are worth celebrating.

    Yes, we work very hard but we also have the distinct privilege of feeling that our work matters and we make a difference. The public certainly seems to think so or am I grossly misguided in where these stats come from ?
    Yea, I know. As I said. It's nice. My experience is that I don't buy it. People can be pretty cagey, and so can I. Pts and families usually like me, but for a fair percentage, especially with kids, they will watch and you have to prove to them that you know what you are doing and that you care. I say, what's wrong with that? Doesn't bother me one bit.

    People are protective over their bodies and families. I mean aren't you?

    I've also picked up time with babies in home care. The better majority of them now have audio-visual on their babies and in the environment on the nurses. Again, that doesn't bother me one bit. If my kid were on a vent (or even not on a vent), and had to have many different things done to them, heck, I'd probably do the same thing.

    Sorry, I just feel like the poll doesn't necessarily represent how people really think. I mean it's one thing to talk in generalities. It's a whole other deal when you or your loved one or baby is receiving care from other people.

    I have always accepted that it was on me to build trust with patients and families and others.

    Just not sure what that poll actually means or how we can expand it in terms of generality.
    lindarn likes this.
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    Quote from kabfighter
    I find it interesting that psychiatrists get their own distinction from other medical doctors.
    I have an opinion about this gleaned from an unpleasant experience: Medical doctors are able to turn toward very rigorous, scientific, and objective evidence to support their diagnoses.

    Psychiatry, on the other hand, is stuck with FAR less objective data to support their's. It can take YEARS to get an accurate psychiatric diagnosis. Yet some are rendered upon first encounter. There are no lab tests to confirm their diagnoses. It is merely one person's OPINION, which may or may not be reached by another practitioner.

    Are you Borderline, or just way overstressed, with a sensitive, emotional bent? Are you truly a Narcissist, or do just have an overdeveloped ego and are a bit of a jackass? Do you actually have ADD, or are you unmotivated and/or depressed, or lazy, and that's just who you are?

    Labeling individuals is fraught w difficulty. Their main diagnostic tool is the MMPI, which is far from perfect, and does not render a picture of a holistic human being, and cannot be interpreted on face value. It only points one way, and cannot be interpreted out of the context of a person's life history.

    And therapy? I personally feel that those who are highly suggestible may attually be at risk when in therapy.

    We are all far more than the sum of our parts, or even our short term behaviors. Psychiatric pts. must be observed over time, and all behavior must be viewed in CONTEXT of circumstances and that pts particular history.

    All of these things make diagnosis and treatment difficult.

    Read the DSM, and see how many diagnoses you might see yourself fitting!

    The DSM and the MMPI really suck compared to cardiac enzymes and CT scans!

    I believe this is why pure medicine is a separate issue from psychiatry. Psychiatry is FAR from exact.
    lindarn likes this.
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    I think the results of the poll are indicative of the following:

    The role of nurses as patient advocate. Period. I see that as my number one professional responsibility. We ARE the 24 hr link to the doctor! Pts and family members KNOW this, and I think these results reflect that....it's because of all the wonderful nurses who say "I see your pain is not being managed, let me notify the doc and see what we can do." Or, "You are having a big surgery tomorrow, and will be on narcotics and mostly in bed for a few days. When was your last BM? 4 days ago? Okay, let's get you a laxative today. No need for minor constipation to turn into major discomfort!" Or taking the time and effort to simply make someone more comfortable, by performing thorough oral care on a pt. who is mouth breathing, dehydrated, and dying. By cheerleading! "Great job of ambulating and deep breathing, I know you are in pain, but this is going to speed your recovery!" By educating and comforting family members, telling them what to expect, seeking an early hospice referral, the list goes on and on.

    And this poll is very heartening! Despite the fact that we are often over-worked, the public clearly recognizes our role and it's importance in health care delivery.
    lindarn likes this.
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    Not surprised nurses ranked so high.
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    Quote from CherylRNBSN
    I think the results of the poll are indicative of the following:

    The role of nurses as patient advocate. Period. I see that as my number one professional responsibility. We ARE the 24 hr link to the doctor! Pts and family members KNOW this, and I think these results reflect that....it's because of all the wonderful nurses who say "I see your pain is not being managed, let me notify the doc and see what we can do." Or, "You are having a big surgery tomorrow, and will be on narcotics and mostly in bed for a few days. When was your last BM? 4 days ago? Okay, let's get you a laxative today. No need for minor constipation to turn into major discomfort!" Or taking the time and effort to simply make someone more comfortable, by performing thorough oral care on a pt. who is mouth breathing, dehydrated, and dying. By cheerleading! "Great job of ambulating and deep breathing, I know you are in pain, but this is going to speed your recovery!" By educating and comforting family members, telling them what to expect, seeking an early hospice referral, the list goes on and on.

    And this poll is very heartening! Despite the fact that we are often over-worked, the public clearly recognizes our role and it's importance in health care delivery.
    You raise excellent points. Our job is to be educators and advocates at the point of care. Also, educating the patients on preventive medicine is all a part of medical ethics.
    lindarn likes this.


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