Florence Nightingale Birthday: World's Famous Nurse - page 2

Upon graduation from nursing school, we all probably remember reciting the Nightingale Pledge, a modified "Hippocratic Oath" composed in 1893 by Mrs. Lystra E. Gretter and a Committee for the Farrand... Read More

  1. by   tnbutterfly
    I love the vintage nursing stuff, too.

    Thanks for the link to the movie. I doubt that Flo looked like Jaclyn Smith. LOL
  2. by   nursel56
    Quote from tnbutterfly
    I love the vintage nursing stuff, too.

    Thanks for the link to the movie. I doubt that Flo looked like Jaclyn Smith. LOL
    . . .or Kay Francis . . . in The White Angel (1936) gotta love Hollywood versions of reality (?) Thanks for the youtube link, too tnbutterfly that's what I love about AN so much to learn!

  3. by   nurseprnRN
    Some of you might remember Country Joe and the Fish ("And it's one, two, three, what are we fighting for? Don't ask me, I don't give a damn, Next stop is Viet Nam ...") As it turns out, he's a huge fan of our lady here and has quite a website for her. Check it out!

    Country Joe McDonald's Florence Nightingale Tribute
  4. by   DoGoodThenGo
    Can you imagine providing patient care in all those crinolines? *LOL*

    And those aprons/pinafores! Blasted things would be almost standard issue for nurse's uniforms well past the 1950's in some areas of the western world. Students would be the last to suffer with them and IIRC there are still some schools that put their girls in some variation of them.
  5. by   Nurse lonalee
    how sweet! i must say she is one of the best foundering father's of nursing.
  6. by   tnbutterfly
    OK....... No one has guessed the answer to this bit of trivia:
    What animal did Florence Nightingale carry with her, even when doing hospital rounds?
    Florence Nightingale kept an owl by her side most of the time.

    This little baby Owl (Athena noctue) was rescued by Florence after a fall from its nest at the Parthenon in Athens, Greece. She was in the possession of some Greek youngsters, who were tormenting the infant hatchling. Her nursing instincts came into being as she fed and trained the owl to enter a cage giving it the moniker, Athena after the Greek goddess. Soon it would perch on her finger to receive its daily meal and afterwards bow and curtsy on whatever object was nearby. Athena began travelling everywhere, safely lodged in the pocket of Florence. The bird became famous as her trademark, but infamous as well...the fierce expressive bird used its long, sharp beak to peck intrusive human visitors

    To read more about Flo's unusual devoted companion, you can go to Owlet Athena (1850 - 1855) - Find A Grave Memorial
  7. by   Annachu512
    Wow, we share a birthday! Very interesting
  8. by   TJ74
    In truth the death rate in Scutari was higher than in any other Crimean hospital.

    A much better Crimean role model would be Mary Seacole who actually went to the front line and worked (and drank) with the soldiers there.
  9. by   whodatlady504
    wonderful!!
  10. by   tnbutterfly
    Medscape Nurses published this great article about Florence Nightingale with lots of history and a quiz to test your knowledge about Flo.

    To read the article and take the quiz, go to Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Flo?

    You may have to create a free account to read the entire article.


    For more about Flo, read Happy Birthday to the World's Most Famous Nurse.
  11. by   Esme12
    Longfellow first published this poem "Santa Filomena" in the Atlantic Monthly in November 1857. dubbing Flo as the lady with the lamp.

    Santa Filomena was the patron saint of the sick. Santa Filomena
    Whene'er a noble deed is wrought,
    Whene'er is spoken a noble thought,
    Our hearts, in glad surprise,
    To higher levels rise.

    The tidal wave of deeper souls
    Into our inmost being rolls,
    And lifts us unawares
    Out of all meaner cares.

    Honour to those whose words or deeds
    Thus help us in our daily needs,
    And by their overflow
    Raise us from what is low!

    Thus thought I, as by night I read
    Of the great army of the dead,
    The trenches cold and damp,
    The starved and frozen camp, -

    The wounded from the battle-plain,
    In dreary hospitals of pain,
    The cheerless corridors,
    The cold and stony floors.

    Lo! in that house of misery
    A lady with a lamp I see
    Pass through the glimmering gloom,
    And flit from room to room.

    And slow, as in a dream of bliss,
    The speechless sufferer turns to kiss
    Her shadow, as it falls
    Upon the darkening walls.

    As if a door in heaven should be
    Opened and then closed suddenly,
    The vision came and went,
    The light shone and was spent.

    On England's annals, through the long
    Hereafter of her speech and song,
    That light its rays shall cast
    From portals of the past.

    A Lady with a Lamp shall stand
    In the great history of the land,
    A noble type of good,
    Heroic womanhood.

    Nor even shall be wanting here
    The palm, the lily, and the spear,
    The symbols that of yore
    Saint Filomena bore.
  12. by   tnbutterfly
    Bumping this back up for Flo's birthday and the end of Nurses Week. Flo would've been 194 today.

    Happy Birthday Flo!
  13. by   Mr Midwife
    Quote from TJ74
    In truth the death rate in Scutari was higher than in any other Crimean hospital.

    A much better Crimean role model would be Mary Seacole who actually went to the front line and worked (and drank) with the soldiers there.
    I'm so glad someone got this in before I did. Much of Ms Seacoles work in the war was overshadowed and its such a shame that even today there is controversy surrounding her work and actions.

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