Comparing a nurses' salary - page 6

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports employment among Registered Nurses will grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2018. They also report that large metropolitan cities such as... Read More

  1. Visit  HighPursuit23 profile page
    0
    Quote from RCBR
    I am in St Louis, MO and will start as a new grad next month @ $21.00/hr working full time in acute care for the largest health system in the region. I also got an offer from the number 2 hospital system @ 20.80/hr. I am super excited to have a job (many of my classmates have not) but the pay is depressing. Listen, $21.00/hr is good money if you went to a community college and your whole nursing education cost you $5,000.00. But people like me who went to 4 year schools had to borrow 30-40K to pay for school tuition alone. Once those student loans payment start to kick in, plus rent, car payment and other expenses, $21.00/hr is going to be barely enough. The RN pay structure needs to be changed to reflect the reality of the BSN educated RN who enters the profession with tens of thousands in students loans versus the ADN nurse who starts almost debt free.
    That's exactly why I'm considering a community college instead of a private college or a university. Thanks everyone for this news feed, it's really helpful in making the decision of the NURSING PROGRAM that fits my location and budget!!! Thanks a million
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  3. Visit  SE_BSN_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from Wild Irish LPN
    never missed a shift due to snow yet...but I have the notion we are in for epic snow this season, we have had it too good the last few years...the epic event will surely happen when I will be working, and then there is no way to get home...ride out the storm and make monster OT....it could really happen....
    I know. That's what worries me. I just need it not to snow on Tuesday. LOL
  4. Visit  bubblejet50 profile page
    4
    Quote from RCBR
    Are you for real??? Universities award bachelor degrees. Community colleges award associate degrees. They are not the same degree. Please approach reality. I cannot believe you think that 2 and 4 year educational institutions award the same degree. Are you even a nurse?

    Yes I can. The content is not the same. BSN graduates have 120-130 credit hours of education versus 60-70. Sorry, but twice the credit hours IS A BETTER EDUCATION. Now, if you think all that extra education makes no practical difference, look at the research done by Aiken et al. showing that the higher the education of nurses the lower the mortality of patients.
    I went through an ADN program and went on to an RN-BSN program that I am currently enrolled in. The difference in the two programs was literally only 7 nursing classes and a total of 24 credits. The rest of the degree was the normal filler gen ed classes that every bachelor candidate must take regardless what they are getting their degree in. There are no true clinicals in this program. It is not from a for profit school. I don't see much difference in the knowledge base of a new grad BSN and an ADN. The classes I have to take are about health policies and laws, pathophys (which some schools require for their ADN programs....mine did not), assessment (which most people test out dropping the credits earned to 20), 2 management classes, community health, and evidence-based nursing. But add in the extra english, stats, fine arts, foreign language, and humanities and you fill up your degree but is it really practically used in nursing? I had these classes completed before I went for my RN degree and I feel the only class that had helped was my research methods class in the psych dept that taught me APA.

    In my area new grad BSN's are actually less clinically prepared than new grad ADN's. They have gone through more studies but ADN programs still focus more on clinical skills much like the old hospital programs. That does count for something. I came out of school in my last semester taking total patient care of 4 patients and having a lot of practice with IVs, catheters, drains, drips, telemetry...
    I am going for my BSN since all the hospitals in my area are magnet status but I'm not sure that by saying twice the credits means a better education is exactly on target. It's a lot of filler classes in any program.

    You also say that the NCLEX is not a fair tool. I agree. All you have to be is a good guesser. Doctors and dental hygienists have a clinical aspect of boards and maybe nursing needs to go to that but with the amount of nurses out there that would be a lengthy process to get into be tested. I have seen nurses, both BSN and ADN prepared, on the floor that didn't know up from down and couldn't even set up and IV pump that passed NCLEX.

    Maybe the licenses need to be re-evaluated. I'm not sure what the right answer is to this problem but the girl I knew from a private 4 year university had the same knowledge base on disease processes as I did myself and we would compare our programs and honestly didn't find anything but clinical that was different.
  5. Visit  breaktime profile page
    0
    I live in the southeast and make a little over 50K per year as a relatively new nurse (been working here for 1.5 years, first job out of school). That is actually a bit lower than the other hospital systems in my immediate area but I work at the hospital I wanted to work at, on the unit I wanted, with the schedule I wanted and that matters more to me. I make the same as another nurse who started the same day as me who is a diploma nurse. She's an awesome nurse and I have no problem that we make the same amount.

    That said, I can see where people are coming from when they say BSN nurses should earn more because they have a higher level of education/degree. In many jobs and professions, even if hired at the same time (sometimes even if you have less time and/or experience) and doing the same job, the person with the higher education (whatever that level may be) is paid more. I've heard (from the people who make the decisions on how much to pay their employees) various rationales for this, but the three most common are these: one is that the higher education (sometimes even if not related to the current position held) is still exactly that, more education, and is seen as another tool in the skill set of that employee; two is that the person with the higher education had the motivation and took the time to earn a higher degree and that should earn them something (I equate this one to a situation where two people can work on some system or technology with equal skill but one has a piece of paper saying they are certified to do it, and so sometimes earns more simply because they took the trouble to take the test); and three is that the person with the higher education often has more opportunities open to them and if not given some type of incentive such as higher pay, will likely leave their current position for one that either pays more simply because of their degree or requires their level of degree and happens to pay more.

    I'm not saying I agree with any of these rationales, nor that I disagree for that matter. They are simply reasons I have been given over the years for why people in the same position with different levels of education might be paid different wages/salaries. Personally, as long as I make enough to not be worried about my family's financial situation, and I (most days at least ) enjoy my work, I'm satisfied (especially in this economy).

    P.S. I apologize for any poor grammar or spelling, my browser is acting strange and after I was a few lines into the second paragraph I could no longer see what I was typing as the screen continually scrolls back up.
  6. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    3
    Look, here's the bottom line. Even though there are two different educational pathways to get your RN, the fact remains that they result in the EXACT same licensure with the EXACT same scope of practice. Maybe that should change. Maybe the BSN should result in a separate license with a higher scope of practice. THEN a higher pay grade would be justified. Until then....

    There are two pathways to practical nursing, too. I went to a 10 month vocational school. Some LPNs go to a year and a half community college program. Do they deserve more pay than me? Of course not. A LPN is a LPN and the BON makes zero distinction.
    joanna73, rammstein, and xenogenetic like this.
  7. Visit  pattyweb profile page
    0
    Where are you that you are making $30k/yr? New grads around me are making at least $37k, and on nights, over $40k.
  8. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    1
    Needless to say, once again it all depends on location & the facility. Therefore, make sure you do a little research prior accepting any job, remember the phrase "You Get What You Pay For" just saying...Aloha~
    Last edit by GitanoRN on Aug 28, '12
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  9. Visit  kabooski profile page
    2
    Hospitals like to brag and even "not profit" ones make ALOT of profit. So here in Central Florida, the ADN will be a thing of the past. My school announced that they are doing away with the ADN program and going strictly BSN starting in 2014. Why? because the hospitals told them they do not want to hire anymore ASN/ADN; in-fact, they are forcing all of their ASN/ADN RN's (even those with 10+ experience) to back to school and get their bachelors.

    You can bet if this community college does it, then all others in the area will do it to. So to all those that want to move here, get ready to go back to school. Pay will be the same, but hey, you can tell your family and friends you have a "bachelors" degree now.
    SE_BSN_RN and laborer like this.
  10. Visit  dirtyhippiegirl profile page
    1
    Quote from Teal72
    Yes seriously...I have no reason to lie..i don't know if you can access it but you can look up the KAiser permanente contracts online and see. Or I'd anyone else in the Sacramento Region please feel free to add.. Especially if you work at KAiser!
    True, but while I'm only making $26.50/hr for noc shift in the midwest, I'm also only paying $700/month mortgage for a 2300 sq house.
    squirtcatt likes this.
  11. Visit  tnmarie profile page
    1
    When my mom graduated LPN school, she barely made above minimum wage, hehe (early 1980s). I make $18.00.hr as an LPN and don't plan on accepting anything less than $25 as an RN.

    As far as those projections go, I just don't know. I don't know if anyone else has noticed but people can't afford health care, censuses are going down, and nursing hours are being cut (not to mention the almost inevitable crash of medicare). Maybe the hour cutting thing is just where I'm from though.

    You also have to take cost of living. I can make around $25/hr here as an RN or drive two hours away and make upwards of $50/hr but also see my living expenses double and triple as well.

    Some posts on this thread have me wondering if the male/female pay gap exists in nursing, hmmm....
    squirtcatt likes this.
  12. Visit  austx_fsa profile page
    1
    Austin, Texas... BSN RN (Foreign Trained - Philippines) USA Texas License Spring 2011.

    First Offer LTC $19 (Turned Down)
    Second Offer LTC $23.50 (accepted and worked there 2 months)
    Third Offer Dialysis Clinic (they trained me...) Started at $24.50 been there a year and now making $25.50 avg with weekend pay.

    Pro: Limited weekend work (every other Saturday) and no major holidays.
    Con: Early hours 4:30am,, work can get a bit too repetetive.

    Currently looking for something else (maybe in med-surg to bolster my Dialysis credentials), as no real increase after they spent $10k in training costs (8-12 weeks),,, according to the one year contract I signed.

    As my Father-in-law says,,, if you don't take care of her,,, Someone else will.

    BTW... BSNs should get a bit more pay to start "In my opinion". Perhaps, they
    should receive 2 years of work experience credit when determining starting pay.

    AusTx_FSA
    Last edit by austx_fsa on Aug 28, '12 : Reason: Added additional comment
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  13. Visit  squirtcatt profile page
    0
    Ok after reading most of these posts I just had to comment! when I looked for my first job in 2000 I actually applied to 3 hospitals, one in Colorado, one in Minnesota and one in Wisconsin! Colorado called and their starting pay was a joke, for the cost of living in that area. Minnesota did not want me, but I did not want them either. I took a job in Wisconsin starting pay was $16.57, heck, I thought I was rich! I worked there for 11 years, when I quit to head South I was making $35.30 base with the extras of straight nights, charge nurse pay and weekend pay thrown in! I had no prolem doing what ever I wanted and buying whatever I wanted. It depends on where you live the cost of living is a huge factor. Yes California pays great, but the cost of living is a heck of lot more than Wisconsin or Texas where I am now. Oh and one year I did make around $80,000 when I worked overtime, the hospital had a great little incentive to do it and it did not take but maybe one day extra a pay period.
  14. Visit  SE_BSN_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from squirtcatt
    Ok after reading most of these posts I just had to comment! when I looked for my first job in 2000 I actually applied to 3 hospitals, one in Colorado, one in Minnesota and one in Wisconsin! Colorado called and their starting pay was a joke, for the cost of living in that area. Minnesota did not want me, but I did not want them either. I took a job in Wisconsin starting pay was $16.57, heck, I thought I was rich! I worked there for 11 years, when I quit to head South I was making $35.30 base with the extras of straight nights, charge nurse pay and weekend pay thrown in! I had no prolem doing what ever I wanted and buying whatever I wanted. It depends on where you live the cost of living is a huge factor. Yes California pays great, but the cost of living is a heck of lot more than Wisconsin or Texas where I am now. Oh and one year I did make around $80,000 when I worked overtime, the hospital had a great little incentive to do it and it did not take but maybe one day extra a pay period.
    Where in TX are you? I want to apply to the GN program at Baylor in Dallas. Do you know anything about the pay for that area? Any pros/cons?

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