She was honest but...

  1. 0
    I interviewed a nurse today for a position as a quality review manager for our organization. She disclosed her narcotic IPN issue at the interview, which I think was a brave and honest move and definitely got her some serious brownie points. We have not offered her the job.

    This is a corporate job with no direct patient contact but she will have access to patient information and a bunch of physician information too.

    She is the strongest candidate I have interviewed and I want to hire her but I am afraid she might be tempted to use patient and physician information to illegally obtain narcs.

    Are my fears unfounded? Am I being too paranoid? What is our liability if she actually does this since she has disclosed her problem and we would knowingly be hiring a person with a narc problem?
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 1,474 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 8 Comments so far...

  5. 3
    Being in a monitoring program means just that.....being closely monitored. She is being drug tested 1-2 times per month and is most likely involved in some sort of group support with an addictionologist. Because of that she is probably more safe than the other candidates you have interviewed that could be abusing drugs and/or alcohol and you have no idea about it. This person has had to jump through many many hoops to be in that monitoring program. Even if she were to use a pt's info to try to get drugs ( and I can't figure out how that would work), don't forget that her urine is being closely monitored for drugs and alcohol so it would become apparent rather quickly if she had relapsed. Oh and don't forget that she also has mandatory meetings every week too with AA or NA. Just some more info about being in a monitoring program that you probably weren't aware of.
    catmom1, michigooseBSN, and TXRN2 like this.
  6. 0
    i agree with the above. if she is truly sincere about her recovery, she will make you one of the best employees you have ever had!! it can be very difficult to find a job while in a monitoring program- i know i am extremely grateful to have the job that i have. a lot of things that bother others at my place of work don't even phase me, because i'm so grateful just to be working!!
  7. 2
    It is so hard for nurses in these programs to find jobs willing to give them a second chance. The fact that you have come and asked and are considering is wonderful. We are very closely monitored. As with ANY employee, there are "bad apples". But likely, all this prospective employee needs is the chance to prove that she can be a great nurse, now that she is getting over her addiction.
    If more employers would take the steps you are and consider the pros vs cons of a IPN nurse, I think the chances of nurses successfully completing the program would definitely rise.
    The IPN's past is just that....the past. In all honesty, with the monitoring and random drug testing and all the other requirements...it will probably be your least likely employee to take advantage of you.
    Good luck in your decision
    syckRN and catmom1 like this.
  8. 2
    Quote from banannabag
    Being in a monitoring program means just that.....being closely monitored. She is being drug tested 1-2 times per month and is most likely involved in some sort of group support with an addictionologist. Because of that she is probably more safe than the other candidates you have interviewed that could be abusing drugs and/or alcohol and you have no idea about it. This person has had to jump through many many hoops to be in that monitoring program. Even if she were to use a pt's info to try to get drugs ( and I can't figure out how that would work), don't forget that her urine is being closely monitored for drugs and alcohol so it would become apparent rather quickly if she had relapsed. Oh and don't forget that she also has mandatory meetings every week too with AA or NA. Just some more info about being in a monitoring program that you probably weren't aware of.
    Agreed. Monitoring programs are pretty strict and it's nearly impossible for her to relapse without it being detected quickly. Also, look at how much clean time she has. If she's only got a few months under her belt, I can understand your hesitance at hiring her. But if she's got years of clean time, that shows she is serious and committed to her recovery.

    And keep in mind the fact that because no other candidate has disclosed a drug/alcohol problem doesn't mean they don't have one...or won't develop one.

    I think it's wonderful that you're seriously considering her as a candidate when many employers would see the words "in recovery" and toss her aside without giving her a chance.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Nov 3, '10
    CrufflerJJ and catmom1 like this.
  9. 1
    As one who has been "tossed aside" many times, even after being clean and sober for almost 6 years and being monitored without incident for over four, I am very moved by the questions being asked by curious_boss.

    How I wish the many hiring managers who looked down their noses at me because of my past had taken the time to really find out what we monitored nurses go through to retain our licenses.

    Of course, some of those hiring managers were so negative, that they wouldn't even have trusted the contributors to this forum for an honest answer. This is because many who post here have gotten in similar trouble. To these managers, we must all be liars, cheats, and thieves, not to mention untrustworthy dopefiends.

    I must confess that I am sitting here sobbing now. I have been out of work for some time and couldn't pay my rent for the first time ever this month. On the bright side, I have an amazing THREE job interviews this week and am PRAYING that one (or more) of them results in a job offer.

    Thank you for letting me share.


    Catmom

    P.S. I also can't imagine how having physician and patient information could be used to get drugs.
    syckRN likes this.
  10. 8
    Thanks for the responses. It definitely helps and sheds more light on what she might be going through. I will schedule a second round of interviews with her and clarify some of the points brought up in a couple of posts.

    Her chances just improved even more although there is still some more due diligence to do on my part. Thanks!
    Meriwhen, TCRNCOB61, awsmfun, and 5 others like this.
  11. 5
    I just went in my supervisor's office yesterday and thanked him yet again for giving me a chance when I know there were other candidates for the job more qualified who did not have a history of substance abuse or being monitored by the Board of Nursing. It means the world to me that someone took a chance on me and gave me an opportunity to prove myself as a sober nurse. I've been at my current job since July 23, 2009 and have received above average evaluations and gotten a 6k raise a few months back. I do my job and do it well. I am closely monitored by the Board and work on my recovery daily. My drug of choice was narcotics as well (pain medication). Being given a second chance meant the world to me and I thank my supervisor every few months because the last thing I want to do is take this job for granted. I agree with the other posters in that you don't know about other nurses who AREN'T being monitored. I know of a few (not that I work with now but that I used to work with in the ICU) who smoked pot and came in after drinking all night and probably had serious issues with alcohol. They weren't in any program with the Board and I'm not sure I would want them caring for me. One of them was also not the most trustworthy employee I've ever come across. So just because someone is a recovering addict/alcoholic doesn't mean they should be discounted or not trusted. If they are truly in recovery and working a program, they will be one of the best employees you will ever have. That much I know.
    AmericanRN, TXRN2, catmom1, and 2 others like this.
  12. 1
    An inspiring thread that provides hope for everyone still searching for employment. Thank you for not jumping to conclusions about this applicant and searching out answers to your questions. You're obviously an openminded individual-the world could use more people like you!
    TXRN2 likes this.


Top