Rehab Success Rate???

  1. Hi all:

    Does anybody have any numbers of the success rate of the substance abuse industry? I simply have no idea and Mr. Google hasn't been that helpful. Thank You all!!!
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  2. 70 Comments

  3. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from SpankedInPittsburgh
    Hi all:

    Does anybody have any numbers of the success rate of the substance abuse industry? I simply have no idea and Mr. Google hasn't been that helpful. Thank You all!!!
    I don't know the industry statistics but I did read somewhere that less than 15% of all alcoholic ever make an attempt at recovery and of the 15% less than 3% achieve long term sobriety.

    Try google scholar

    Hppy
  4. by   malamud69
    Again....read : "The Sober Truth" by MD Dodes...it has real science in it and everything
  5. by   malamud69
    We are not addressing the underlying issues...our healthcare system is reactive not preventative...the industry wants and keeps people ill...its very lucrative. The extension of this tragedy known as the "rehab industry" or whatever you want to call it is no different...all humans...whatever the illness are numbers in a financial ledger in corporate america...don't ever make the mistake of seeing it any other way...
  6. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    WOW!! If that's the case you have to wonder why we keep following and funding the same model like it's some certified trip to the promised land. I think for the criminal justice system the answer is pretty easy. Without these sentencing alternatives there would simply be no room left in the already over-crowded jails. What about us though? We are medical professionals subscribing to a course of treatment for a disease with a 3% recovery rate at huge investment of time and money. Perhaps its because its because that the rehab industry is the only alternative? I'll be honest I stay sober so I can keep drawing a paycheck. I'd stay sober if I was just subject to the random screenings without the months-long sideshow that rehab & my weekly meetings consist of or the AA meetings for that matter. Of course it doesn't matter. I got an offer I couldn't refuse so I'll keep doing what I'm told to do but it makes little sense to me
  7. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from SpankedInPittsburgh
    WOW!! If that's the case you have to wonder why we keep following and funding the same model like it's some certified trip to the promised land. I think for the criminal justice system the answer is pretty easy. Without these sentencing alternatives there would simply be no room left in the already over-crowded jails. What about us though? We are medical professionals subscribing to a course of treatment for a disease with a 3% recovery rate at huge investment of time and money. Perhaps its because its because that the rehab industry is the only alternative? I'll be honest I stay sober so I can keep drawing a paycheck. I'd stay sober if I was just subject to the random screenings without the months-long sideshow that rehab & my weekly meetings consist of or the AA meetings for that matter. Of course it doesn't matter. I got an offer I couldn't refuse so I'll keep doing what I'm told to do but it makes little sense to me
    I just returned today from the American Psychiatric Nurses Assoc (APNA) national conference and I can tell you that there is change being talked about. New DSM IV Dx of substance use disorder is less stigmatizing and allows physicians and more importantly FPNPs and MHNPs to have candid discussions with patients about problematic coping skills which is the root of all addictive behavior. New medications and treatment modalities are on the horizon. I don't know if I can post the link to be accessed by Non APNA but the discussions were very interesting.

    Hppy
  8. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    that sounds very interesting & I'd love to read the material. I know whatever happens will have no effect on my case or (most likely) anybody who posts here but its nice to know that these issues are at least being examined with new treatment options in mind
  9. by   catsmeow1972
    Well you've got the APMA and the APA all talking about differentiation in making the idea of substance use disorders ( along with mental health disagnoses) less stigmatizing. Ideally that is all based on studies, evidence, common sense and the desire to be as humane as possible. None of this notions are present in the recovery industry in its current form and certainly not in any of these professional monitoring programs.
    True recovery is what the person wants it to be. Not coming from the viewpoint of addiction, much of my thought may not mean much but I am of the opinion that recovery cannot be beaten into someone. These professional monitoring programs, regardless of what they babble on about care nothing about a persons recovery. Once they are done financially sucking a nurse dry and the contract is done or the nurse gives up, they could not care less if said nurse goes right out and hits up the street corner pharmacist. If in the process a nurse chooses true recovery I think the program has very little to do with it.
    We've all observed that when it comes to these programs stigma rules the day, outdated modalities of treatment are common, evidenced based practice is cited only when convenient and participation in religious mumbo-jumbo is mandated to keep a state issued license.
  10. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    I've ordered the sober truth on Amazon and look forward to reading it
  11. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    I think one of the problems with recovery as I know it is that it is an all or nothing affair. If I was treating a copd patient who I got to reduce his smoking by 1/2 I'd call that a win in terms of harm reduction. No moral judgement & no BS. If an alcoholic goes from a fifth of whiskey a day down to an occasional slip it is an epic and moral failing. If he does it in a monitoring program he loses his livelihood. I don't think this is a rational way of looking at treating a chronic disease. If we can lose the judgemental moral failing garbage maybe we can sensibly look at treating this disease. By the way do we punish other patients suffering from s disease? If a diabetic eats a candy bar do we take his job? I think the safe practice argument is a discrete issue. Probably as many nurses as other members of the population suffer from substance abuse issues and the vast majority go to work everyday. If it can be shown that this issue affects a nurses ability to practice in specific terms by all means don't let them see patients. If not treat and help as opposed to punish and break
  12. by   catsmeow1972
    Prescisly . So far as these programs go. Appropriate would be DAU. You pee clean. You work. You don’t. You’re off work until cleared by YOUR (not chosen by program) doc/shrink/addictionologist. If you get written up or fired at work, that’s your problem. Program notified. Happens X number of times, BON notified, appropriate action taken.
    All this forced voluntary meeting attendance, forced rehab attendance, forced employment loss, forced financial ruin, forced loss of dignity.....has nothing to do with ensuring safety in practice.
    Last edit by catsmeow1972 on Oct 22
  13. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Amen!!!!
    Last edit by SpankedInPittsburgh on Oct 22
  14. by   berdawn
    This may be a useful look at other options
    The Irrationality of Alcoholics Anonymous - The Atlantic

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