Nurses who smoke Marijuana? Nurses who smoke Marijuana? - pg.11 | allnurses

Nurses who smoke Marijuana? - page 11

Hello all, I am currently taking my prerequisites for Nursing. I know two nurses, one is a friend of my mothers and she is a Nurse Practitioner and my boyfriend's mother is a charge nurse in... Read More

  1. Visit  jdub6 profile page
    Quote from elkpark
    I don't have any personal experience or knowledge, but I do know that some members have posted here in the past that the BONs in some states do not allow individuals taking psychoactive medications (like Ativan) with a rx, under a physician's supervision, to practice. No psychoactive meds, period, with or without a rx.
    This must differ from state to state. As far as I know the only drug that is absolutely not allowed in mine is methadone (which I personally believe is less impairing than some of the allowed drugs but that's the way it is. )

    Every pre hire drug test I've gone to they ask you to disclose your meds and if it's Ativan or something they ask for the bottle or md note and that's it.
  2. Visit  jdub6 profile page
    Quote from subee
    Just because someone has a prescription for a drug does Not mean that they are free to work while under the effects if the drug.
    There are no medical indications for MJ with the exceptions of HIV and MS. Being in a diversion program for years and having to hire a lawyer made my decision to quit quite easy.
    This also is state dependant. My state has I think about 12 conditions including epilepsy, maybe ptsd, a bunch of others. And they are adding more.

    The unique issue here is that, as others have said, it is still federally illegal regardless of prescription status.. I could see where that could make it a no go no matter what your state law is.
  3. Visit  jdub6 profile page
    Quote from icuRNmaggie
    Would that make possession of a small amount a misdemeanor and not a felony?
    No. I have lived in cities which have decriminalization mj. You got a 25$ fine for possession- much like a speeding ticket. No record unless you don't pay.
  4. Visit  LLLovely profile page
    Quote from subee
    Just because someone has a prescription for a drug does Not mean that they are free to work while under the effects if the drug.
    There are no medical indications for MJ with the exceptions of HIV and MS. Being in a diversion program for years and having to hire a lawyer made my decision to quit quite easy.
    Actually, there are quite a few other medical indications including glaucoma and PTSD, but none of that matters. If your state, state BON, or facility prohibits it, then that's it. It can be legal all day long and still not allowed. Opiates are legal if you have a prescription and a medical indication to use them. We all know that means you still can't show up at work with opiates in your system. Unfortunately, testing for marijuana is not sophisticated enough to determine when you used it or whether you are currently high.

    I live in a state where marijuana is legal for both medical and recreational use. At every facility, there is a statement of understanding to sign that says that you cannot use marijuana while an employee. Whether you think that is stupid, or whether it is empirically stupid, is irrelevant. If you get tested and THC or THC metabolites are present, you are subject to disciplinary action and may be at risk for losing your nursing license. Some facilities go so far as to say that their ability to dispense medications is governed by Federal law and therefore marijuana use among employees who may prescribe or dispense or administer medication is prohibited by Federal law.

    I voted for marijuana to be legal in this state, despite the fact that so long as I'm working as a nurse, I won't be able to partake because I know it is not worth it. Truthfully, I am just not lucky enough to take the chance. Even as a kid, if everybody was doing something wrong, I'd be the one to get caught and made into an example. That is not a big deal if you are taping a "kick me" sign to someone's back, but substance use while holding an RN license is. Again, it is just not worth my license to risk it.

    Should there be a more sophisticated test in the future and should the BON and facility where I work happen to allow off-duty marijuana as they do alcohol, I'll probably try it now and again on a weekend. I haven't had any since the age of 18, so waiting for it to become legal, which I believe it will, is not really a big sacrifice for me. I really think that if it is a big sacrifice for someone, they need to give some serious consideration to why that might be true.

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