Can I become a Nurse Practioner? - page 3

by onprobation:( 9,466 Views | 42 Comments

Hello all, thank you for reading :) At this time I am on probation for narcotics diversion. I was a nurse in labor and delivery. I have now been sober for 2 years :) I do having a nursing job in my field as a WIC nurse at the... Read More


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    Well Said Blue Devil. I have a much better understanding of what you meant now. And Btw, I knew your were a male .
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    I would just like to say congratulations to the OP. Working that hard and staying motivated enough to stick with nursing is a big deal and one you should be incredibly proud of. With that said, I can see the allure of going for an NP degree as a way to show how much you have improved and that you have left your past behind you. But as many other posters have pointed out, it is a hard road that has no guarantee of being able to practice at the end. I wonder if you have thought of getting an MSN or Phd instead? You can always research or teach, your experience would be invaluable. You said you work in a public health setting, what about getting a MPH degree and work on setting policy and improving public health care and practices? There are so many ways you can keep moving forward professionally and prove to yourself that you are better then your past. Being an NP is by no means the only route for advanced nursing. Don't be discouraged, you have come this far! Just look at all the other ways you can grow and help. If you do, you will find yourself so much further then you can imagine now!

    Best of luck!
    Tinabeanrn likes this.
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    I'd like to start my post and reply to BlueDevil DNP (BDDNP) with a short preface of sorts.

    While my response is aimed at BDDNP, the broader message is aimed at the other readers in an effort to expose the arrogance of what those in a position of some authority tout as "truth" and is nothing more than personal opinion. Opinion being a kinder term to what is otherwise obvious ignorance.

    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    My comment was misinterpreted. I am saying that honest human error (not malpractice or negligence) that results in even tragic patient outcomes, including death, is often more easily forgiven by professional boards than is narcotic abuse/diversion. Savvy?
    I am well-informed that you are very mis-informed or as you put it, not savvy.

    How many board review cases have you participated in?
    Wait, don't answer that.

    It's a rhetorical question.

    Because even if you have, what ever that number may be, it hasn't been enough.

    What are you talking about? "Honest human error?"
    "Easily forgiven by professional boards?"
    What state do you practice in? I don't want to be treated medically there. Last thing I need is an honest human error to occur and I be left with no legal recourse.

    Cases that deal with injury or death that reach the state board investigatory process because of an "error" are at a minimum due to negligence in some part.
    The mission of state licensing boards is to protect the public. Not to protect those that are licensed.
    A full dismissal is not happening.
    Just the "risk of endangering a patient," not even actual injury, leads to some type of board disciplinary action. So I don't know where you're coming from with your statement.

    I speak on professional experience as a NP that has assisted with board litigation on years of review cases. And I can tell you that none are easily "forgiven."

    You can claim my response as misrepresenting your response, but it doesn't. Your statement is very clear. Here it is again:

    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    In short, professionally speaking you would be better off if you had killed someone. It is too bad that some mistakes really do ruin the rest of your life. I do wish you the best of luck.
    Misrepresented? Nah, still pretty cut and dry to me.

    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I genuinely wish the OP the best, but I do think they have a very difficult road ahead of them. Perhaps it is not impossible, but I don't think they are well served by pretending that the challenge is easily surmountable. In many environments, that Scarlett letter makes them an undesirable job candidate even if they get past admissions committees, state boards and the DEA. If I were making life plans, I'd be very, very careful knowing that. And being pragmatic, as you so correctly point out, I'd be appreciative of honest appraisals of my situation.
    I guess I was laying it on pretty thick. Then again your response was about as tactful as Rush Limbaugh on the Affordable Care Act.

    So here's exactly what I mean by someone in a position of authority speaking in a way of cleverly veiling personal opinion as truth.
    Because the question is "Can I become a Nurse Practitioner?"
    Not, "Would you want me to be a Nurse Practitioner in your practice?"

    Your answer may as well be; Definitely NO, but maybe.
    The arrogance of ignorance.

    The only honest answer is, I don't know. No one here knows.

    The actions I recommended the OP to take are those that many nursing school candidates take prior to applying to professional nursing programs. How do I know this? Because the smart ones request legal advice from the practice before applying, just like the OP here is.
    They are those same persons that BDDNP would label as having ruined their lives.
    Don't even get me started on that comment.

    And believe it or not, those licensing boards respond. So candidates have an answer on what to expect before they make a financial and personal investment in a program. An answer that is in writing, so they can present it should they encounter road blocks when in pursuit of licensure.

    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Thanks for the vote of confidence in my intentions. As a "well-known, long-time member here with the majority of her (sic) posts falling in the pragmatic and sensible categories, I'm quite certain I deserve it.
    And I am not a she, BTW. I guess I am not all that well known after all, lol.
    I mean well known to the All Nurses community, not to me personally. I guess your posts came across somewhat catty. LOL

    Some may wonder why I'm flaming BDDNP. The reason is because HE is DNP prepared. A higher level of responsibility is placed on an individual with that type of preparation. An initial response that reeks of ignorance and is then doubled down with arrogance when called out deserves to be flamed.

    Many "students" of professional nursing and advanced practice nursing come here, to this forum in search of answers. Those of us in advanced practice should take the time to give them an honest answer. Not disparage them with calloused opinion.

    Reminds me of a quote I once read.

    "Those who don't know and don't know they don't know - they are fools - avoid them."
    Last edit by TX RN on Feb 13, '13
    TransformedRN likes this.
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    Here! Here!
    Nccity2002 likes this.
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    I initially said misinterpreted, and I thought it was a misunderstanding. However, you are certainly misrepresenting me in your last post, intentionally it seems. I am not sure why you want to make me out to be the villain here when I am not the individual who broke the law or breached the trust of my patients. What I did do was offer an honest opinion on the likelihood that an individual who did do so would be hired into a private practice like mine, should they get by the other obstacles. And yes, we would be more likely to hire someone who made an error that resulted in sentinel event, provided they were not drunk at the time.
    elkpark likes this.
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    Well, I'm a bit shocked by blue devil's comment. This place we call earth is getting more and more harder everyday. The part where Blue devil said they liked a doctor and didn't hire him because he declared bankruptcy and got a divorce made me feel sad. Clearly he's accomplished but had some trouble in his past. I was sad because the judgement wasn't based on his skills. Yes, everyone in our population doesn't have the perfect life. I've had circumstances beyond my control. Like a bad evil family member who has tried to destroy me because I wouldn't give them money. Yes, their accusations are all lies, but you are going to judge me because of my past? I tell you, the coldest awful people work in healthcare. Best of luck to you.
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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I wonder first of all if you could get into a NP program with that albatross around your neck. DEA privileges could also be an issue for you. They might forgive a provider whom is already licensed, but I can see them denying a first time DEA license to someone with a diversion "conviction."

    Assuming you could get past both those barriers, I think once you are "forgiven" by the BON, the past is past. However, you will have to divulge that stain to every potential employer, and I do see that being a very large obstacle. My group, for instance, would not consider you. We didn't hire a physician we sorely wanted because he had declared bankruptcy in the past associated with a divorce. We really liked him, we really wanted him, we just didn't want to take any chances. A narcotic issue would have meant we never even seriously reviewed his credentials, and we certainly would not have taken the time to interview him.

    I am not saying this to flame or shame you, but narcotics diversion has got to be the worst thing a health care provider can do and it will be very difficult for you to get past it. In short, professionally speaking you would be better off if you had killed someone. It is too bad that some mistakes really do ruin the rest of your life. I do wish you the best of luck.
    Sorry if this is a dumb question, but why didn't you want to hire him? How would that affect him doing his job?
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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    And I am not a she, BTW. I guess I am not all that well known after all, lol.
    Now that explains a lot ;-)

    I will read your comments under a new light now.

    And BTW, I understood what you meant originally and agree. The OP is better off knowing the reality now instead of putting years and money into something that won't go anywhere.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I initially said misinterpreted, and I thought it was a misunderstanding. However, you are certainly misrepresenting me in your last post, intentionally it seems. I am not sure why you want to make me out to be the villain here when I am not the individual who broke the law or breached the trust of my patients. What I did do was offer an honest opinion on the likelihood that an individual who did do so would be hired into a private practice like mine, should they get by the other obstacles. And yes, we would be more likely to hire someone who made an error that resulted in sentinel event, provided they were not drunk at the time.
    I understood what you meant and agree your original comment is being deliberately skewed out of context. People who want to be offended will be. That's on them. Those who want to try to "get it" can grasp it without too much effort and without getting all butthurt. It isn't enough to just say, Gee, I don't agree with that point; have you considered xyz? There will always be those in a group that demonize you for making a good point that they disagree with or that they just don't want to hear. That's how it goes on the interwebz.

    From one Duke alum to another, I say keep on keepin' on. I agree with you for the most part.
    Nccity2002 and elkpark like this.
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    I am a Nurse Practitioner who is the BON state program after reporting a DUI several years ago. I do have an active DEA number as well as an active Advanced Practice license. I have been a nurse and a nurse practitioner over 20 years. During this time I too got divorced and filed bankruptcy. I am so grateful for employers who are practical and nonjudgmental who realize people have hardships, make mistakes , fall down and pick themselves up ! I certainly didn't let my past mistakes define me but I will tell you they made me the competent, skilled , experienced and practical NP I am today! If one wants to enter into advanced practice nursing or higher education in any field that should be supported and welcomed as long as you are doing it for the right reasons. You feel confident enough in your skills and profession to want to practice at a higher level of nursing. I can't speak for the BON or the DEA but if you are seeking more professional autonomy and feel you will be an asset as an NP then start taking some classes to see if it's feasible . Good luck too you .
    jackstem, TXRN2, and Tinabeanrn like this.


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