passive staff development

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    Our DON is in charge of "staff development" It is all passive. Articles to read every month-handouts and online. The only off-site offering 2003 was the basic PALS. Is this the way staff development is heading-or is it just lack of creativity, laziness. Con ed is way low on DON's/Administration's list of priorities.
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  5. 0
    Quote from ednurse
    Our DON is in charge of "staff development" It is all passive. Articles to read every month-handouts and online. The only off-site offering 2003 was the basic PALS. Is this the way staff development is heading-or is it just lack of creativity, laziness. Con ed is way low on DON's/Administration's list of priorities.
    I suspect that your DON is more of an administrator than an educator. She probably reads journals on management topics, goes to management conferences, etc. ... but may never have studied the field of staff development. If you check out the field of staff development, you will find that active learning is very prominent and preferred.

    On the other hand ... I have personally found that some nurses are not willing or able to invest the time and energy it takes for a more sophisticated or more active educational program. Such programs are also more expensive as the participants need (deserve) to be paid, facilities and materials aquired, coverage for the nurses participating has to be provided, etc. I suspect that a "lack of resources" is also a big part of your DON's problem. If she had the appropriate resourses, she would be able to hire a professional nursing staff development educator and do a lot more.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Mar 17, '05
  6. 0
    She's probably to busy....

    Being the DON is busy enough. Adding staff development.......

    Your facility needs to dedicate someone to do education.
  7. 0
    I support education efforts in over 70 hospitals all of which have on-line education opportunities. I see this an effective way to provide coginitive and theoretical education in light of the current unit or nursing floor environment. There still has to be classroom events to support the theory through practice. Practice and repetition with an education foundation leads to competence.

    Education is truly a value statement in any industry. How many resources are thrown at it determines where it ranks in the food chain within a given company or hospital. Another telling sign of education value is seen by the degree of involvement in strategic decisions. I have pushed the leadership enough to be at the table whenever any strategic efforts might include education.

    The vulnerability for all educators and education opportunities comes most apparent when there are economic shortfalls and RIFs. To better insulate my position in the hospital and to show value I provide how education has contributed to the the strategic goals of the hospital (increased patient quality, saved money, reduced turnover, etc.)
    That means doing our job differently and figuring out how to demonstrate value in your given environment...to be valuable one has to show value to key stakeholders, which may go beyond your DON.


    Quote from ednurse
    Our DON is in charge of "staff development" It is all passive. Articles to read every month-handouts and online. The only off-site offering 2003 was the basic PALS. Is this the way staff development is heading-or is it just lack of creativity, laziness. Con ed is way low on DON's/Administration's list of priorities.
  8. 0
    Quote from ednurse
    Our DON is in charge of "staff development" It is all passive. Articles to read every month-handouts and online. The only off-site offering 2003 was the basic PALS. Is this the way staff development is heading-or is it just lack of creativity, laziness. Con ed is way low on DON's/Administration's list of priorities.
    It sounds as if this is just a requirement for her to do and she's not into formal educational program presentation. It can be difficult because I have done education and no one is interested enough to show up for the presentations. I know everyone is busy but this is how we provide for evidenced based practice. A thought.....why not have each nurse take a month and do a presentation from something read or even a case study. It makes it more interesting when you share with your peers and it would relieve your DON and she would probably be VERY pleased with you. Do a 'lunch and learn' and everybody bring a sack lunch. :hatparty:
  9. 0
    Quote from klj836
    It sounds as if this is just a requirement Do a 'lunch and learn' and everybody bring a sack lunch. :hatparty:
    The old "lunch and learn" is alive and well at my institution. It is too bad that it is taken literally. "Lunch" is "noon to 1PM". The day shift or "A" (12 hour staff) is enhanced to make sure as many as possible may attend. Unfortunately, the PM, NOC, and "B" shift get nothing and have to be short staffed because of the additions needed for Day and "A" shift to attend. They wonder why they cannot keep PM or NOC or "B" shift staff but then the second class status is considered normal- shorter orientation periods because of staffing shortages, and generally less staffing because "nothing happens on these shifts" except the clean up from the previous shift and all the emergency admissions, surgeries, etc. The charge nurse is not assigned patients on "A" or Days but on the second class level in addition to charge you have a full patient load. It is a learning experience but I can't say it is a positive one.
  10. 0
    Staff development is a whole nursing speciality. Teaching strategies should vary in order to be effective to a maximum number of learners. I would not say she is lazy, because it is HARD to wear too many hats. I believe a full time educator is needed.


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