Complying with CA BON deficient courses - page 2

by RhanSantiago84

19,398 Views | 103 Comments

As the title states for the folks that have to take certain courses such as OB, MS or either Psyc, has anyone visited and spoken to any Nursing directors at the approved CA BON Nursing Schools listed on the website? If so... Read More


  1. 1
    How can IEN plan accordingly if the CABON didn't implement it too years ago,the question is why just now.easy for some to saywhat they want as if they knoweverything esp.what we IEN are facing right now and by judging the education we had if its outside the US,when in fact they can't even handle real clinical cases like theones we had in our nursing years(Philippines).
    guiatorres likes this.
  2. 0
    The laws have been in place for a long time. Let's use the concurrency as an example.

    Board of Registered Nursing - Title 16, California Code of Regulations

    look at letter d.
    and at the bottom of that section look at the dates.
    HISTORY 1. Amendment of subsection (d) filed 4-27-87; operative 5-27-87 (Register 87, No. 18).



    Unless someone has a hard copy stating that this amendment was initiated at a recent time I believe this amendment would apply since 1987 until now as stated in the Nursing Practice Act.
  3. 0
    I understand your point but look at this way it's their rules. We have to play by their(CABON) rules. Instead of lingering on the problem, let's try and solve it! A lot of internationally educated students are affected by this not just Filipinos and if we just pull all our resources together we can figure this out.
    Last edit by BayAreaResident on Jun 5, '12
  4. 0
    I know of no way for nurses to meet the requirement of "classroom education with concurrent clinical practice" if not provided by their original nursing education program except to apply to a US based education program and retake deficient cources.

    When issue is nurse is "short" # hours in one or two areas, some programs may accept practicing RN into just those courses.
    They the glut of students, few programs are willing to provide this option, especially with clinical sites crowded in many California areas-- not enough patients for all the students in a few facilities.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jul 31, '12
  5. 0
    The issue is foreign educated nurses fail 70percent , that is unacceptable. US nurses are taught to read the nurse practice act of their state. Passing the NClEX the first time and understanding how the BON operates is basic nursing practice.To solve your problem become a lvn, and take a bridge program to become R N, problem solved.
  6. 0
    See if anyone gets an answer from this website, she's offering the solution, as mentioned in the big RED box, but I'm not 100% convinced.

    http://www.lisasclinicalremedy.org/I..._Students.html
  7. 1
    Quote from Ginger's Mom
    The issue is foreign educated nurses fail 70percent , that is unacceptable. US nurses are taught to read the nurse practice act of their state. Passing the NClEX the first time and understanding how the BON operates is basic nursing practice.To solve your problem become a lvn, and take a bridge program to become R N, problem solved.
    Here's some information from our own nursing stats for our own boards. No, I didn't take the exam myself as I feel I'm not totally prepared. But that's also why I and many of my batchmates are so ANGRY at our own colleges, we have been given and taught "inferior classes", sorry to sad, but it's time to admit it!

    We know of so many of our other US friends, US cousins, US sisters, US brothers who graduated in the States and they all passed the NCLEX right out of their schools, most took the exam months after getting their ATT. Most only used Kaplan or Saunders reviews, if they even needed it. If you look at the CA BON NCLEX passing rates, you'll find it's very high from 80-90% or higher.

    Here's the sad information of our own colleges and school:

    This year, 78,513 nursing graduates took the board examinations. Fewer than half—37,513 examinees—passed, according to the Professional Regulatory Commission (PRC), which administered the tests.

    In 2009, a record 88,649 nursing graduates took the board examinations, but only 39,455 passed.
    Last edit by steppybay on Jun 5, '12 : Reason: spelling
    BayAreaResident likes this.
  8. 0
    Hi Ginger Mom what's interesting is why didn't they full enforce the rules even during the Nursing shortage they could've avoided getting these fake diplomas, transcripts etc..and rules being clearer for international graduates my .02 cents of thoughts.
  9. 0
    I have to admit during my time in the Philippines, the Nursing schools were PACKED with students! In my first year of college there were 2500 of us and that number steadily decreased until 500 of us graduated during my batch of '09. Other nursing schools had DOUBLE that number.

    The nursing "craze" was used by colleges as a money crop. They would accept everybody! And slowly start decreasing the numbers every year. We were always told that the nursing shortage was still occuring all over the world and that the program we enrolled in was accredited world wide. Being 18 during my freshman year, I didn't even think to look at the requirements of the CABON.
  10. 0
    Quote from BayAreaResident
    I have to admit during my time in the Philippines, the Nursing schools were PACKED with students! In my first year of college there were 2500 of us and that number steadily decreased until 500 of us graduated during my batch of '09. Other nursing schools had DOUBLE that number.

    The nursing "craze" was used by colleges as a money crop. They would accept everybody! And slowly start decreasing the numbers every year. We were always told that the nursing shortage was still occuring all over the world and that the program we enrolled in was accredited world wide. Being 18 during my freshman year, I didn't even think to look at the requirements of the CABON.
    BINGO! I couldn't have said it any better!

    I mentioned this before and I will mention it again....our PH nursing board was nothing than a pure GREEDY machine. It needed to keep up with the funding so that they could keep the schools going, knowing full well, there was no jobs to be had. Someone else mentioned they have known this for years at least since 2009, I think it was more than that.

    No wonder, we were so packed, looking at the PRC own stats, in just the two years alone, there was 167,162 nursing students that actually graduated!

    If you take the 78,513 PH students and I read somewhere else that almost 23% of PH grads on average wants to come to CA, that's almost 18,000 PH grads competing with only 11,000 CA new grads. There's absolutely NO way any job market is going to be able to absorb almost 30,000 nursing newbies (combo of PH and CA grads), NO way!

    I hated the way they would preach to us, like BayAreaResident says effectively, Don't worry, be happy, God will help us all in His own way.

    It was mentioned in another PH article posted here that at this current rate, the NEED for PH nurses will happen in the year 2021! I don't know about most of you but I have to survive and waiting 9-10 years is not being in the real world.

    I'm ANGRY that we have been so blind-sided by our own nursing board. I would have rather they told me, we will be closing down the schools years ago and do me a favor instead of getting my hopes up and saying the nursing shortage is world-wide from years ago and CA is going to need more nurses than ever before!


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