Why did you do NP?? Instead of Nurse Specialty?

  1. Hello there, I was curious to know why did you choose to go the NP route. I was asked this by a friend. He just couldn't understand why I didn't just go for my MSN in a nurse specialty. This made me wonder what made other people go for NP. If you have a little time it would be appreciated. Thanks
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   jer_sd
    Quote from RN28MD
    Hello there, I was curious to know why did you choose to go the NP route. I was asked this by a friend. He just couldn't understand why I didn't just go for my MSN in a nurse specialty. This made me wonder what made other people go for NP. If you have a little time it would be appreciated. Thanks
    Personlly I wanted the new role and responsibility of a NP rather than a RN. For me to spend time in school I wanted to change my roel and functions in the health care system.

    Usually for a MSN in a specilty that is clinical in nature the student will become an advanced practice nurse, CNS, NP, CRNA, CNM. There are masters programs that do not lead to advanced practive credentials often they can be management focused. I did work with a med/surg nurse who had her MSN (clinical focus) quite a few years ago, she was on the same payscale as the other nurses same job description so was treated the same as any other RN. One nice thing for APNs is that we can always choose to go back to working as a RN role but we also have the option to work in advacned roles. If a student does not complete an APN program they do not have that choice.

    Jeremy
  4. by   lalaxton
    I chose to become an NP as I still wanted to have contact with patients and I was not interested in going into management. From here I can still go into management if I wanted to or go into education, so from my point of view my MSN/FNP gave me the best of all worlds.
  5. by   traumaRUs
    I did the MSN (nonclinical focus) first then did a post-MSN CNS (APN role in IL). I wanted pt contact but knew that staying at the bedside for another 20 years might not be an option.
  6. by   yellow finch
    I'm just curious... what exactly does "Nurse Specialty" mean? I've heard of MSN programs in Education or Research. Is that what you are referring to?
  7. by   christvs
    I chose to go into NP school because I wanted to take on a different role with my patients. I want more autonomy, responsibility, and be more involved in decision making in all aspects of my patients' health. I love taking health histories and doing physical exams, and helping piece together lab results and diagnostic exam results, and help construct differential diagnoses, and then help order the treatment plan. I also love spending time talking with my patients and having the time to explain to them what is happening and really answering their questions, to put them at ease. I have noticed from my 2 and a half years experience as an RN that very rarely do I get adequate time to sit down and talk to my patients about their health concerns-I feel like with my load of 5 or 6 patients on a busy unit, all I have time for are super fast assessments and then I basically distribute all my meds and treatments like a speedy robot! So I have felt very frustrated with that type of role personally. I am truly enjoying the NP role a lot more.
  8. by   RN28MD
    Yellow Finch I guess what I mean of Nurse Specialty is like a Clinical Nurse Specialist. I honestly don't know what types of jobs the do.

    Thanks everyone for replying. I truly appreciate your inputs
  9. by   yellow finch
    Quote from RN28MD
    Yellow Finch I guess what I mean of Nurse Specialty is like a Clinical Nurse Specialist. I honestly don't know what types of jobs the do.

    Thanks everyone for replying. I truly appreciate your inputs
    Ah. I see. Back when I was deciding what to choose I went by what the educational programs offered, what was required for school, listened to experienced nurses describe the jobs, and finally made my decision. I looked at Nurse Educator, CNS, FNP, and ACNP.

    My final decision rested on the fact that the FNP offered a broad scope of practice. Could work directly in patient care and could service all age ranges so if I couldn't work in my first choice of fields I had many other options. I knew a former ICU RN who wound up working with Peds despite her never even considering that field, but was offered a job upon graduation from her FNP program. You just never know where you'll end up!

    CNS seemed to be the area that kept up with new technologies and research then taught to RNs and other disciplines those things. I think that would be the hardest area to find a job in. I didn't want to teach full-time, so Educator wasn't the right choice for me. Plus, with a MSN in any field I could work part-time as an educator.

    ACNP was the only other option and I'm still considering it as a post-master's certificate so that I can spend more time in the hospital as opposed to being "stuck" in a Dr. office.

    Good luck with your decision!
  10. by   RN28MD
    Wow good post yellow fin.., I am leaning toward FNP but I would someday love to work in a hospital as a hospitalist NP. I just don't know if I could jump at it at this moment in my life. Do you know if it take another 2 yrs for the ACPN as a post-masters??? I don't mind if I have to do two yrs because I love school but just curious.

    Merry Christmas
    Feliz Navidad
  11. by   yellow finch
    Merry Christmas to you, too, RN28MD!

    I've done some "shopping around" for post-masters ACNP certificate programs and found the one at St. Louis University had the least amount of requirements with the ability to transfer over some credits. It consists of 6 courses, but 2 can be replaced (Pharm and Health Assessment) by previous education. At least that's the way I see it. It may be worth talking to an advisor about it. I think they have those classes added in for non-NP MSN students.

    It's an online program, but I'm sure if you're adventurous enough to move it can be done on-campus.

    At one point I thought about becoming a Hospitalist, but am veering away from that unless those doors open up at my current hospital. Hopefully I'll be able to get my foot in the door at the Pulmonary practice I'm looking at. Definitely worth the extra year of courses to earn a second certification!
  12. by   sherbeari
    Thanks for the St. Louis University info.

    It does sound like a worthwhile program to look into. I graduate in May with my FNP. I would like to pick up the ACNP certificate in addition.

    Sherri
  13. by   yellow finch
    Sherri, let me know if you do pursue it. I don't graduate until December and would want to wait until passing the FNP boards before moving onto a second degree.

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