Which NP degree to get first?

  1. I'm thinking of possibly getting two APN certifications: one in geri/adult NP and the other in psych NP.

    Which route should I pursue first -- the psych or geri/adult route?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    My own opinion is to get the adult/geri NP first. However, I do believe there is both an adult and geri NP exam. This is what I found:

    "Certifications available
    Advanced Practice:
    Nurse Practitioners

    Acute Care
    Adult
    Adult Psych./Mental Health
    Adv. Diabetes Mgmt.
    Family
    Family Psych./Mental Health
    Gerontological
    Pediatric


    Clinical Nurse Specialists

    Adv. Diabetes Mgmt.
    Adult Health (formerly known as Medical-Surgical)
    Adult Psych./Mental Health
    Child/Adolescent Psych./Mental Health
    Gerontological
    Pediatric
    Public/Community Health"

    This is the ANCC website URL: American Nurses Credentialing Center RN Certification
  4. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from EnergizerNurse
    I'm thinking of possibly getting two APN certifications: one in geri/adult NP and the other in psych NP.

    Which route should I pursue first -- the psych or geri/adult route?
    I know this is an older post but I was just wondering what the OP was really asking about. Was EnergizerNurse interested in doing 3 different NP tracks? That would take a great deal of time (unless of course the OP was intent on being in school for a lot of years)

    Just based on where I went to school, I know that the ANP/GNP route is not necessarily a combined program. The students who finish the ANP track have the option of sitting for the ANP boards after finishing the ANP component of the program or taking up more clinical courses leading to the GNP track and then being able to sit for the GNP boards. Going for board certification in PMHNP requires didactic and clinical rotations in that specialty as well so that may take another year to be able to qualify for the requirements of the PMHNP boards.

    In my opinion, for someone who wants to be able to practice across all the above specialties at the shortest amount of time to finish, the FNP route is one's best bet.
  5. by   brighella
    Theyre right in the middle of implementing a Nurse Educator NP at my school. There are so many different directions to go in, i feel like I could be in school for the next decade!

    Sarah
  6. by   BrandyNP
    Quote from EnergizerNurse
    I'm thinking of possibly getting two APN certifications: one in geri/adult NP and the other in psych NP.

    Which route should I pursue first -- the psych or geri/adult route?
    It's important for you to obtain the Adult NP certification first. The reason being, you will have much more autonomy. Remember, with the geriatric NP certification, you will only be allowed to see patients over the age of 55. As an Adult NP, you can see patients 13 and over (which is great for those NP's who don't want to treat kids). If you become a psych NP, you won't be able to practice in primary care. It may make more sense to just get the Adult NP and later on the psych NP, unless you want to work in the nursing home environment.
  7. by   BrandyNP
    Quote from pinoyNP
    I know this is an older post but I was just wondering what the OP was really asking about. Was EnergizerNurse interested in doing 3 different NP tracks? That would take a great deal of time (unless of course the OP was intent on being in school for a lot of years)

    Just based on where I went to school, I know that the ANP/GNP route is not necessarily a combined program. The students who finish the ANP track have the option of sitting for the ANP boards after finishing the ANP component of the program or taking up more clinical courses leading to the GNP track and then being able to sit for the GNP boards. Going for board certification in PMHNP requires didactic and clinical rotations in that specialty as well so that may take another year to be able to qualify for the requirements of the PMHNP boards.

    In my opinion, for someone who wants to be able to practice across all the above specialties at the shortest amount of time to finish, the FNP route is one's best bet.
    In my state, a FNP can't work as a psych NP. They aren't allowed to make DSM IV diagnoses.

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