What are the BEST and WORST States to practice as an NP?

  1. I am speaking primarily from two perspectives here:
    1. The degree to which NP's are accepted, recognized, and utilized in that area/state.

    2. The degree to which state law recognizes NP's, and grants them autonomy, and privledges such as the ability to write prescriptions.
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  2. 215 Comments

  3. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from Roland
    I am speaking primarily from two perspectives here:
    1. The degree to which NP's are accepted, recognized, and utilized in that area/state.

    2. The degree to which state law recognizes NP's, and grants them autonomy, and privledges such as the ability to write prescriptions.

    I don't know about the best but the worst has got to be GEORGIA. It is still the only state in which NPs do not have prescriptive authority (but PAs do), it is so freakin' embarassing. The bill is in the legislature this year but don't hold your breath waiting for it to pass because our legislature is still wasting energy debating the important issue of gay marriage :uhoh21: , meanwhile...........
  4. by   Dave ARNP
    Best is BY FAR Washington State. Second would probably be Penn.

    WORST? Lemme start a list.
    Georiga, Florida, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia.
    And there are others, but I would have to pull out my chart (which is at my office)

    Dave
  5. by   susanperu
    Worst state? Georgia, hands down....we are in "good old boy" country here......Hopefully soon things will change, although I'm not holding my breath!
  6. by   traumaRUs
    I don't know guys - Illinois ranks up there on the "worst" list. That's why I'm in a generic MSN program - it doesn't pay to be a NP.
  7. by   Roland
    We live in Indiana, but are wanting to move to Hawaii, Nevada or possibly Texas. How do those states fit into the mix?
  8. by   Dave ARNP
    I've never heard anything good about Hawaii.

    Nevada and Texas I'm pretty clueless on.

    -Dave
  9. by   manna
    I don't know about the legalities, but I'd never advise an NP to seek work in Mississippi. 99% of the doctors I've heard mention NPs (or heard by word of mouth from my brother who is a high-and-mighty MD .) seem to think they're uneducated hacks. Ugh.
  10. by   jmarie
    New York is pretty progressive.
    We have an active legislative pac which is busy granting us more and more autonomy every day.
    Jennifer
  11. by   FutureRNMichael
    Since Washington State is high on the list, where does their neighbors to the south in Oregon rank?
  12. by   msumner2
    Quote from SharonMH31
    I don't know about the best but the worst has got to be GEORGIA. It is still the only state in which NPs do not have prescriptive authority (but PAs do), it is so freakin' embarassing. The bill is in the legislature this year but don't hold your breath waiting for it to pass because our legislature is still wasting energy debating the important issue of gay marriage :uhoh21: , meanwhile...........

    Hello, this is my first time on the board. I am an NP student and Georgia native, in Texas right now. I agree. Georgia has to be the worst. One of my NP friends went to medical school to avoid unemployment! I moved to Texas and it is a whole different world here. NP's are working ER's very independently. I heard in OK they practically staff all the ER's. I think the south-west is pretty good. Melissa P.S LOVE the quotes!!!
  13. by   Alnamvet
    California is the BEST for NP's since an MSN is not required to certify and license. There are still several NP certificate programs left in the US, California has 4 or 5 such programs; an example is the UCLA Harbor hospital woman's health care NP program.
  14. by   Roland
    No one besides me has mentioned Texas. However, I read in other places that Texas is really good for CRNA's and nursing salaries in general. Does this not extend to NP's of all specialties (FNP,ACNP ect).

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