Totally floored - put on Probation in FNP program? I can't take this anymore!!!! - page 2

I'm completely devastated. Yesterday my (new) advisor pulled me out of lab and into her office to tell me I am on "academic probation" because I got a 'C' in a course last Spring. (She's just telling... Read More

  1. by   lannisz
    Quote from Dixiecup
    I thank GOD every day for the FNP program I am in. The instructors bend over backwards to make sure you pass.

    I just flunked my first test ever. In advanced pathophysiology. The heart, never understood it, never will.

    My instructor said she would give me study questions for the next test to make sure I score high on it. I'm overwhelmed the lengths they go to to help you.

    I think it's because the tuition is $768 a credit hour so I'm getting my money's worth.

    I envy you! What state are you in - I want to transfer to YOUR school! It's funny you should mention patho - it was our comprehensive final that I bombed last Spring. The instructor writes her own exams - no study guide- and many times the questions don't come from the lecture or the text. It's crazy. And you never get your test back to see what you missed and why...so how are we supposed to learn from our mistakes?:angryfire
  2. by   prairienp
    Quote from zias
    thank you everyone for your replies. and i am struggling with the two lines of thought here - don't make waves vs stand up for your rights and make a fuss. i would refer to the school's own policy and note that i was never formally informed in writing. by not being notified (if i am truly on probation status) i was not given the chance to fight the grade i was given by that other instructor (i had an 89% in that class and evidently bombed the final which was 50% of the grade - i certainly was unaware until after the term was over that i received a c in that class - by then everyone was gone for the summer.) by not being informed by certified mail, where i would have to sign that i had received a letter from the school, i was not given the chance to file a formal grievance.
    why would you need a formal letter to dispute probation? what is stated in your nursing graduate student handbook? most programs will not accept more than 2 "c" grades in graduate courses, sounds as if your school will only accept one and the reason you are on probation. sounds as if your current advisor is doing you a favor, where your previous advisor made a mistake in not filing the right paperwork. did your previous advisor leave the school? maybe with the change your previous advisor did file the paperwork, the forms were lost, and since she was no longer there unable to follow-up? another important thing, what would have happened when the graduate school completed your graduation and found an irregularity, and wouldn't process your graduation? i say talk with your current advisor, get a sense of where you stand. if you are now an "a" student what advantage will be gained by being upset of not receiving a letter stating you are on probation? faculty do discuss students, especially students who are sending letters to the dean. unless you feel the probation will somehow impede your graduation, i would focus your energy on your studies and move on.
  3. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from destiny5
    I agree with Chatsdale. While you are in school you play by their rules.. period. I am sure you know that, from your last nursing program or at the very least, reading other posts. My advice... play the game and graduate.... It makes no sense to me to fight the people who hold your grade, especially when they can test you..ect... and grade you the way they want to.... unless it's all scan-tron but I'm sure it's not. Lay low. If you want to fight...fight after graduation ..... for future students.
    This type of approach is advisable sometimes, I guess, although I don't know how many people are ever inclined to graduate and then go back and fight so someone else will benefit. Discretion is the better part of valor, pick your battles, and all that but I think Nursing is the downtrodden profession it is because no one wants to fight.

    But I think she needs to hold them to the contract, the legal agreement, the legal relationship she's in with them. At the very least, she needs to do some soul searching and figure out why she is being attacked. The issues are not, IMHO, what they have told her. She has managed to insult or embarrass someone, I'd bet, and they are trying to harrass her so she'll leave.
  4. by   Dixiecup
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Would you mind telling me what program you are in?
    I'm doing the online distance FNP program at SLU (St. Louis University)

    It's amazing! I'm in my 5th class so far and each instructor I've had has been so user friendly it's unreal!:hatparty:
  5. by   lannisz
    "sounds as if your current advisor is doing you a favor, where your previous advisor made a mistake in not filing the right paperwork. did your previous advisor leave the school? maybe with the change your previous advisor did file the paperwork, the forms were lost, and since she was no longer there unable to follow-up?"

    this is a very good point. as a matter of fact, my advisor from last year did leave - she retired. she could very well have overlooked something. and it is a no no to get a 'c' in our program. there is another person in my program and he got a 'c' in that same class as me. but he was sent a certified letter informing him formally of his probation status last spring. if i am on probation, according to the manual i can be dismissed from the program if i get another 'c'. however, if i never received formal notification and was not given the opportunity to respond and/or improve, then doesn't that make them out of compliance? that's part of the reason i'm not sure if i should make a big deal about it now, or simply document, document and then ask for clarification after i do well this term. my understanding is that at most schools they inform you that you are at risk, and that you need to 1) not get anymore c's (or perhaps you have to retake the course) and 2) bring your gpa up to a certain level within a certain time frame.
  6. by   prairienp
    Quote from zias
    "sounds as if your current advisor is doing you a favor, where your previous advisor made a mistake in not filing the right paperwork. did your previous advisor leave the school? maybe with the change your previous advisor did file the paperwork, the forms were lost, and since she was no longer there unable to follow-up?"

    this is a very good point. as a matter of fact, my advisor from last year did leave - she retired. she could very well have overlooked something. and it is a no no to get a 'c' in our program. there is another person in my program and he got a 'c' in that same class as me. but he was sent a certified letter informing him formally of his probation status last spring. if i am on probation, according to the manual i can be dismissed from the program if i get another 'c'. however, if i never received formal notification and was not given the opportunity to respond and/or improve, then doesn't that make them out of compliance? that's part of the reason i'm not sure if i should make a big deal about it now, or simply document, document and then ask for clarification after i do well this term. my understanding is that at most schools they inform you that you are at risk, and that you need to 1) not get anymore c's (or perhaps you have to retake the course) and 2) bring your gpa up to a certain level within a certain time frame.
    if you have all "a" grades now you will be fine. in reality, the second year is usually less academically challenging and more time consuming with clinical, which translates into less chance of a low grade. you received one "c", which you can still dispute (at least most universities allow a change of grade later). continue your hard work and maintain those "a" grades and graduate. you don't the have time or energy to waste on one grade. good luck
  7. by   ERNP
    What disturbs me about the whole thing isn't necessarily the lack of a certified letter. Part of being an adult is knowing the rules and in a NP program that often means Cs are unacceptable.

    I am most disturbed by the idea that you can't work your way out of probationary status. It seems there should be some way to accomplish this prior to graduation.

    I would probably schedule an appointment with the dean and my advisor together to discuss what this means and clarify that there isn't some way to get back to good standing prior to graduation.

    To be perfectly honest, if I had made a C in any course it wouldn't have been counted for credit and I would have had to re-take the course. Perhaps that is the only way to achieve good standing again, but the option should at least be on the table.
  8. by   lannisz
    I totally agree with you about the 'C' grade. My problem is that I now have to track down an instructor about something that happened in May and attempt to have someone else review/double check my grades. According to MY records for that class I had an 89%. It would have been much easier to ask for verification back then. This was just one more mess up by a program I have absolutely had it with! I am attending one of its satellite campuses which means the administration is a 7 hour drive away. Our new local "advisor" is an absolute nut case who started working here 10 days before the term began. As she changes her mind from day to day, we all keep pointing out to her what it says in the syllabus or catalogue and she keeps making up her own rules. She adds ADDITIONAL criteria for us to meet - more than the students on the main campus - and tells us we have it too easy. She changes her mind on a whim. The syllabus will say we are to be evaluated one way, then she says (3 days before an eval) that she's going to do it "her way". She has added on clinical time that none of us were prepared for (we are all working adults and this is supposed to be a part-time program). We are supposed to be assigned other FNP's to do our clinicals with in the community.....she is scheduling them so she can "be there to hover over us every minute" (her words, not mine). That sounds like nursing school to me! Last year our advisor would check in a few times with our preceptors, and the people actually working with us had a say in how we were doing. I guess this program has had problems in the past. Many people dropped out and that is why they came up with the part-time option. I am not willing to quit my job. Ihave pretty much decided to get out while I can, not waste anymore money or time with this school. I am researching transferring to a different program. I will ask for verification of that 'C', but most likely I will end up losing those credits and have to take the course again. My husband says I need to sue the school for breach of contract. He says they did not keep up their end of the bargain and if nothing else, they need to be taught a lesson. I blame myself. I knew this school had a bad reputation (word of mouth) for being disorganized and unsupportive to its students and I went anyway. It's been nothing but stressful and disorganized from the very beginning and I've tried everything on my end to make it work.
  9. by   prairienp
    Quote from zias
    I knew this school had a bad reputation (word of mouth) for being disorganized and unsupportive to its students and I went anyway. It's been nothing but stressful and disorganized from the very beginning and I've tried everything on my end to make it work.
    I would still contact the main campus, drive the 7 hours and sit down with the NP program director. Map out a plan of study and make a decision after you have everything in writing from the program director. In the meantime start checking out other schools to see what will transfer, most schools will only accept 9-10 transfer credits.
  10. by   cgfnp
    I know exactly how you feel. I wouldn't be surprised to hear you say you are in the same program I went to. It was almost identical to yours; riddled with BS. The training was nightmarish. There was no organization. And if you even peaked your head out you risked being kicked out. It was truly miserable. What program are you in? You can PM if you're worried someone might see it and figure out who you are (such as the nut cases that "teach" you).
  11. by   lannisz
    cgfnp - I've PM'd you. thanks.
  12. by   joyrochelle
    I feel so much of the same way about my program-- the inconsistencies & all the BS that we deal with. No one seems to know whats going on- the admin staff are incredibly rude and treat you like a teenager when you inquire or ask for clarification, twice Ihave taken courses that during that semester have since been deemed extraneous and have been eradicated for my program track-- so it was a waste of time, money and stress.
    One of the reasons why I selected this program was due to the fact that they assured me that i would be able to cater my clinicals around the womens health experiences I really wanted while still being a FNP program- and now that i am going into my last year of clinicals my professor is balking at my clinical site selections.
    The courses I have now are incredibly esoteric and nevermind the fact that they are completely abusing the Online learning arena under teh guise of "adult learning" and self starting. Gah.... sorry-- i will be so incredibly happy to have this come to a close.
    It just makes me sad though- because similar to your experience i too feel like i cant speak up for fear of being red inked as a trouble maker, and I feel like i am not learning but just jumping through academic hoops. I am very uninspired!
  13. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from zias
    I'm completely devastated. Yesterday my (new) advisor pulled me out of lab and into her office to tell me I am on "academic probation" because I got a 'C' in a course last Spring. (She's just telling me now?) She told me verbally only. This was the FIRST I had ever heard of it. I read the University policy manual and it says "a certified letter will be sent to inform the student of probation status and outlining the steps that need to be taken to return to Good Standing. The student will have 10 days to appeal." I did not receive any letter last Spring (4 months ago!) or even see one with my advisor when she told me about being on probation. I still have maintained a cumulative GPA above 3.0 which is considered In Good Standing. I am halfway through my FNP/MS program - I don't know if I can take this anymore! They keep changing the rules as they go along and I'm sick of it. For example, an instructor will say "well, it didn't ask in the assignment criteria for you to include this area in your paper, but I'm going to mark you down for it anyway." Or "This is not supposed to be a graded assignment....but I'm counting it as graded." This term (Fall) I currently have straight A's - pretty typical for me, and my performance has also been praised. How can I be on probationary status and also have had no formal notification? The worst thing is that I was told you are never taken OFF probation! If you meet all the requirements (which are supposed to be outlined in the certified letter that I have never received) at graduation, then and only then will your transcript be changed to "In Good Standing." As an aside, this University has been sued 3 times in the last 5 years by students in both the undergrad and grad programs - I'm guessing this type of BS has something to do with it. I need feedback, advice and moral support. Has anyone else experienced this? Thank you for listening.
    My best advice is to not get anymore C's. As long as you keep your
    grades up you are untouchable, dont give them a reason, study hard ok. Good luck.

close