Should I inform current employer of APRN license?

  1. I have worked in a large hospital as an RN for the past 5 years, and have recently graduated with my Master's in Nursing and have recently been certified by ANCC and received my licensure last week. Do I need to let my current employer know about this and my new license? Or does it matter, since I am currently looking for a new job. Sorry, not sure how this all works! Thanks!
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   nomadcrna
    You are now judged at a different standard. No longer as an RN but as a nurse practitioner.
  4. by   elkpark
    A lot of employers would have a serious problem with you not informing them of additional licensure. Lots of employers also have policies against allowing people to work below their level of licensure. Have you really gotten all the way through an NP program without mentioning to your current employer that you were in school? Why so secretive?
  5. by   MJC2118
    Ok well first of all, I work for a large hospital... yes, my manager knows I was in school, graduated and am now an NP. I was more or less referring to HR and whether or not I need to have my transcripts, certification all that brought into them. No, I didn't inform HR or our CEO or anyone like that, that I was in school. But yes, my manager knows. I was referring to the formality of it all. Not secretive.
  6. by   MJC2118
    I would also like to add that I continue to work as an RN here because I have been doing so for the last 5 years and have been since graduating because I have to pay bills, but am looking for an NP job. Not trying to be secretive, just didn't know if I needed to turn in all the formal paperwork to HR if I was to be switching jobs soon. Also, I'm pretty sure it is not a policy at my facility to work in an RN position if your are an APRN. A coworker of mine stayed here PRN after getting her FNP.
  7. by   traumaRUs
    When I graduated in 2006 there were NO jobs so yes, I kept working as an ED staff RN for 3 months while I looked for a job. The big hospital I worked for knew about it as I attended their college of nursing.

    For me, back then it wasn't a big deal.
  8. by   BrnEyedGirl
    I worked for a large hospital group for almost 20 years prior to becoming an FNP (still work for them as an NP). Of course all my coworkers and my immediate supervisors were very aware as they had cheered me along. When I passed my boards, it was the legal department that had a problem with the whole "being held to the standard of your highest education", they felt it put me in a precarious position for increased liability. I work ED so, they decided that A. there was ALWAYS a doc in the department, in charge of the patients care, B. I did not have a collaborative practice agreement with any of those docs, so in theory I could not function as an NP. It ended up working out, but I was gently rushed on to my new role.
  9. by   Nurse Beth
    You do not have to turn in documents to HR unless they are required for your job (example: RN license, BLS).
    If your hospital offers a differential or Clinical Ladder points for an advanced degree, you may want to turn in proof of your Master's degree.
  10. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from nomadcrna
    You are now judged at a different standard. No longer as an RN but as a nurse practitioner.
    I'm not sure exactly what you mean. I've known a few NPs that picked up RN shifts for extra money. They worked those strictly in a non-advanced practice role.
  11. by   Neuro Guy NP
    Yes that whole different standard thing is hogwash. You're only responsible for the role in which you are practicing. BON regs say so. Most states explicitly say that nothing in their APN laws shall be construed to prohibit an individual from still engaging in professional nursing practice. You cannot be held responsible for APRN level of responsibility if you are not practicing or interacting with a patient in that role, especially if you are not even privileged at that hospital to do so. Doesn't make sense. Anything to the contrary is myth.
  12. by   Owlgal
    Quote from elkpark
    A lot of employers would have a serious problem with you not informing them of additional licensure. Lots of employers also have policies against allowing people to work below their level of licensure. Have you really gotten all the way through an NP program without mentioning to your current employer that you were in school? Why so secretive?
    I haven't told my employer that I'm in a Master's program. I can't imagine that it's any of her business, unless I make it her business. I did submit paperwork for tuition reimbursement through HR -- though, I'm not even sure my Executive Director receives that information, as I work for a large healthcare system and I imagine that tuition reimbursement is handled by another department.

    I work in management and I definitely don't want any of the assumptions about my work performance that people could make, once they know that I'm not making a career of this gig. As a salaried employee who is responsible for the performance of my departments, I keep my personal life well-away from my work life. It's all great when things are going well and everyone is happy-happy-joy-joy; but if something goes amiss (which eventually happens when you're dealing with 100's of patients and 30+ employees), they'll crucify you with any information they have about you. It's the joys of middle-management.

    I am carefully considering discussing my educational needs with my executive director this spring, as I anticipate having to adjust my work schedule to accommodate clinicals. I fully expect that I will have to let this job go and find a bedside nursing gig; but it doesn't hurt to ask.
  13. by   TammyG
    Agree with Neuro Guy on this. I never understood how that got started, but I have heard of some RNs being hassled because of it. Because you have not been hired as an NP, you obviously do not have a collaborating or supervising physician, and you certainly are not provided with malpractice insurance by the hospital. You are not performing in an NP role and would not be expected to execute NP-level judgment.

    I would not see why you would have an obligation to inform your employer. However, if in doubt or you are concerned, tell your supervisor.

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