Residency programs for NP graduates? - page 2

I am planning on going back to school for my MSN/ACNP or to a PA program. I am very disappointed in the limited amount of clinical hours offered in the NP programs 700 or less as compared to the PA... Read More

  1. by   ghillbert
    Recently heard about ACNP fellowship/residency in Texas: The Methodist Hospital - Dept. of Nursing
  2. by   Le-Lee_FNP
    also take into account that PAs have more clinical hours because they have to rotate through various specialties as they are generalists. NPs specialize in one focus area (family, peds, acute, care, psych, etc).
  3. by   kerrybamrick
    [color=#333333]hi. i’m the program coordinator for the nurse practitioner residency program at chc, that was referenced above in one of the earlier posts. our program is a 12 month, full time, salaried position intended for fnps who are committed to developing careers as pcps in the challenging setting of community health centers and other safety net systems. the program structure includes: precepted primary care sessions, specialty rotations, independent clinics and didactic sessions. we're starting to receive applications for four positions to the 2011-2012 residency class. the application deadline is april 1, 2011. if you want to know more, please drop me a note. you may also visit our website at www.npresidency.com
  4. by   nomadcrna
    You can work in surgery the same way PAs do as a FNP. You don't need to be a RNFA.
    We have a few FNPs that work with the Ortho guys in the OR.

    Ron

    Quote from suzanne4
    Cardiology uses nurse practitioners. To assist in the OR you are talking about RNFAs. That requires two years of experience as an OR nurse, 2000 hours of time in the job category, as well as writing an exam. Most RNFAs are not NPs.

    You normally do not see cardiologists in the OR, only at some facilities where the AICD is implanted in the OR. Then they are there with the CV surgeon. But again, this depends on the facility.

    Hope that this helps.................
  5. by   nomadcrna
    FNPs are the generalists, just as PAs are.

    Ron

    Quote from BSN_Angel_RN
    also take into account that PAs have more clinical hours because they have to rotate through various specialties as they are generalists. NPs specialize in one focus area (family, peds, acute, care, psych, etc).
  6. by   Annaiya
    Quote from nomadcrna
    FNPs are the generalists, just as PAs are.

    Ron
    This isn't true for all states. It is my understanding that FNPs can only work in primary care in TX, therefore they could not work in the OR. I have a feeling that more states will start to follow this pattern as there are more NPs and more specialties.
  7. by   nomadcrna
    Actually, they are getting away from that model. See the consensus model the organizations have come up with.

    Texas is one of the most restrictive states for a NP to practice in. I would avoid it like the plague.
  8. by   nomadcrna
    From a bit of reseach, it appears only Maryland and Texas place these limitations on FNPs.
    I doubt many other states, at least in the west and north will do this as to many rural ERs are covered by FNPs.

    Ron

    Quote from Annaiya
    This isn't true for all states. It is my understanding that FNPs can only work in primary care in TX, therefore they could not work in the OR. I have a feeling that more states will start to follow this pattern as there are more NPs and more specialties.

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