ready to drop out of FNP program - page 2

I'm so burned out, frustrated and ready to quit! I am in my second year of my FNP program and hate it! We have a new clinical advisor and the program is so disorganised....we were told our class... Read More

  1. by   Papadoc
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Hmmmmmmm I had 2 acquaintances who went to foreign medical schools about 15 years ago. Interestingly enough, niether of them are doctors. And they are both still cutting off their arms to pay off huge debts, there are lots of hurdles. One couldn't ever pass the exams, the other's school apparently wasn't well recognized by residency programs so he was never able to get into a residency program.

    We are not all Doctor Wanna Be's. If we were, we woulda gone to med school.
    The schools which I refer to have listings of their graduates, and residency placements on their websites. Many alumni, who are now attendings, and big-time specialists, are available for questions. ROSS alone has over 5000 graduates practicing in U.S and Canada. Some are even in EU and Ausie Land. as for some ppl not making it through ....Yeah, you bet! I know some ppl who singed up at health club 15 years ago. Today they are just as fat, unhealthy and as misarable as they were back then, if not more. Should I then draw a conclusion that work outs and life style modifications don't work? It doesn't work for those who don't work it. Medical school is for sure...just not gonna work for ppl who'sgot more problems than the've got solutions, IMHO.
  2. by   gauge14iv
    But you arent listening to what we are saying!

    WE DON'T WANT TO BE DOCTORS! NO INTEREST! THANKS BUT NO THANKS!


  3. by   cgfnp
    Quote from gauge14iv
    But you arent listening to what we are saying!

    WE DON'T WANT TO BE DOCTORS! NO INTEREST! THANKS BUT NO THANKS!


    I do. But only if they wisely create a 2-3 year bridge program for PA/NP family practice. It only makes sense to do so given the shortage of PCP physicians and the training and experience of primary care midlevels. You can guarantee I'll be the first in line for those programs if they ever happen because where I'm at the only difference will be the title and the salary. I'll do exactly the same stuff I'm doing now, and bill the same amount of money, but for some reason, the administration will pay me twice as much for a different title. Makes a lot of business sense, eh?

    Now the docs out there will say, "there's no shortcuts, blah blah blah" but give me a break. We're not asking for a short cut. You could easily cut out the specialty rotations and probably much of the bookwork and a lot of us would bite at the chance. But to start out with the same requirements as a fresh-out-of-undergrad 22 yr old... please. To go through 6-7 yrs minimum of education and experience to get the FNP and then go 5-6 yrs add'l education and residency would hardly be a short cut IMO. It would, however, provide a reasonable bridge for those of us who are older with families to catch the train that we missed while we were young.
  4. by   ERNP
    Here is a little change of pace. I work with a doc who says he wished he had went to NP school instead of medical school.

    I used to think I would go to med school if there was some experience credit. I don't know that I would now. So many docs are sooooo miserable. It doesn't provide the social status it once did, they aren't getting the reimbursement they once did, and society as a whole is more and more demanding of perfection in medical practice.

    I have settled into the life I have created and am currently enjoying my own ride.

    To the OP............... hang in there. The whole school chaos is only a test. If there were an actual emergency someone on some well meaning cable channel would give some sort of instruction. Recently, I have had the occasion to speak to my children about the same disorganized chaotic environment that is passing for higher education these days. I will tell you what I told them...... "These are just the hoops you have to jump through to get the piece of paper that will allow you to do what you want to do in the end."

    HANG IN THERE!!!
  5. by   gauge14iv
    I have had several docs tell me the same thing - Being a doc is all they can do because they are too invested in it to do anything else.

    I always did know that I wanted a whole lot of kids, I wanted to be home with them in the evenings and on the weekends, I wanted to be at their sports and school events - and all of that was FAR more important to me.
  6. by   NRSKarenRN
    Our beloved family Dr. 6 yrs ago gave up his solo private practice after 20 years---cause he was missing his 15yo sons hockey games. He had worked part time in urgent care clinic and could schedule shifts there but having solo practice left practically no family life. We miss him but supported his decision of quality family life.
  7. by   Papadoc
    Yes, it's true that many docs are not happy campers these days. Especially the once in the primary care. But there are many specialties that allow for a great life style, and earning potential. It's a personal choice. And there is no one "right" approach. I know many women who have children, and even single moms in med school and residency. I've never heard them complain, at least not publicly, while many guys who went straight from high school to college to med school are whining. These days is what you call "true calling" that brings those who are not delusional to the medical profession. Those of us who understand what they've gotten themselves into are doing it not because, but despite what it may bring at the end. As for missery and overwork / underpay... I dare you to name one field in any walk of life where it isn't hold true. You've got to do what you like, and money will follow, IMHO.
  8. by   lannisz
    Quote from ERNP
    To the OP............... hang in there. The whole school chaos is only a test. If there were an actual emergency someone on some well meaning cable channel would give some sort of instruction. Recently, I have had the occasion to speak to my children about the same disorganized chaotic environment that is passing for higher education these days. I will tell you what I told them...... "These are just the hoops you have to jump through to get the piece of paper that will allow you to do what you want to do in the end."

    HANG IN THERE!!!
    LOL!!! Thanks for the big giggle today! I'm off to face another full day of "hoop classes" and will take your message of hope with me.
  9. by   ERNP
    [quote=Papadoc]Yes, it's true that many docs are not happy campers these days. Especially the once in the primary care. But there are many specialties that allow for a great life style, and earning potential. [quote]

    This conversation is off topic, but the primary care docs are the only ones happy where I work. The hospitalists admit all their patients and they are basically just down to an office practice and telling everyone who calls to go to the ER.
  10. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from Papadoc
    Yes, it's true that many docs are not happy campers these days. Especially the once in the primary care. But there are many specialties that allow for a great life style, and earning potential. It's a personal choice. And there is no one "right" approach. I know many women who have children, and even single moms in med school and residency. I've never heard them complain, at least not publicly, while many guys who went straight from high school to college to med school are whining. These days is what you call "true calling" that brings those who are not delusional to the medical profession. Those of us who understand what they've gotten themselves into are doing it not because, but despite what it may bring at the end. As for missery and overwork / underpay... I dare you to name one field in any walk of life where it isn't hold true. You've got to do what you like, and money will follow, IMHO.
    Just because it is the choice YOU made, doesn't make it make it the choice for everyone - if that's the assumption you are operating under (along with the assumption that we all want to be docs) then you are in for some real surprises in the future.
  11. by   santhony44
    To the OP: If NP is what you really want, hang in there. And yes, I agree completely with the hoops thing. Keep in mind this one saying: "This, too, shall pass."

    I was told in my program that you could not work at all and go through the program. However, being fond of living in a house, having electricity, and eating on a regular basis, I did work part-time. Maybe you should look around to see if there are any nursing jobs out there that would work around a school schedule better?

    Not all rewards are financial. There are NP jobs out there that pay lots of $$$ but many are not worth it to me- I'll take less pay for a more livable work situation.

    As for medical school, I've been asked the same question. I just don't want to be a doctor. I've known some great nurses who have gone to med school and become great doctors, and more power to them, but it's not for me.

    I also know one family practice doc who has told me that if she had to do it all over again, she'd go the NP route instead.
  12. by   Josh L.Ac.
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Just because it is the choice YOU made, doesn't make it make it the choice for everyone - if that's the assumption you are operating under (along with the assumption that we all want to be docs) then you are in for some real surprises in the future.

    Really? Maybe it's because my eyes can barely focus on the screen right now, but I don't see where Papadoc is assuming all nurses want to be doctors.
  13. by   traumaRUs
    Josh - you need to look at Papadoc's posting history. He is a med student in the Caribbean who is very pro-MD.

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