Psych nurse practitioner - page 4

by bumblebeegaga

I just got accepted into a psych nurse practitioner program....However, I now have a second thought on accepting it after talking to a couple of PA and MD. I was told that unless I have some sort of inside track, it would be... Read More


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    Viola900, would you mind talking about why nursing school was a terrible experience for you? I ask because I am contemplating pursuing an NP program but have no nursing or medical experience, and am terrified of the nursing school part of it all. I am interested in a PMHNP degree and feel that I would do well in that particular area, but am worried about doing everything it takes to get there (very squeamish about certain things) and not sure how much of dealing with the "yucky" stuff is required...

    Thank you!
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    I'm about to finish nursing school in 3 months; my real interest is psych ( I have a bachelors in pscyhology)...to the previous post, nursing school is very rigorous...a lot to learn, intense professors, dirty tasks in clinical (do you want specifics?). Reading lately about pscyh NP, and its giving me more enthusiasm about the path I've chosen, that it ultimately will pay off in compensation, flexibility, and options. I love helping people on the pscyhological level and nursing school is, well, all about nursing...some pscyhology but largely pathophysiology, pharmacology, nursing management, etc. That said, it is a helping profession, so I think anyone who likes helping would have some level of satisfaction in nursing, as I do.
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    I would love specifics if you're willing to share. Thanks!
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    In my program, in clinical, especially in the early clinicals we are expected to do all patient care and not to take help from the CNA/PCAs, which includes cleaning patients who are incontinent. And as far as I understand, an RN in the workplace needs to show she or he is willing to do any type of patient care in order to gain confindence/cooperation of the CNA/PCA or LPNs.
    Anoetos likes this.
  5. 2
    Quote from jcaitanyadas
    In my program, in clinical, especially in the early clinicals we are expected to do all patient care and not to take help from the CNA/PCAs, which includes cleaning patients who are incontinent. And as far as I understand, an RN in the workplace needs to show she or he is willing to do any type of patient care in order to gain confindence/cooperation of the CNA/PCA or LPNs.
    In acute care settings, all of the client care, including that typically done by CNAs or LPNs is actually, legally, the responsibility and job of the RN in charge of those clients. Sometimes you're able to delegate some of that work to CNAs and/or LPNs. Sometimes you're not. In either case, it's still your responsibility as the RN. In situations where you can delegate, it's still your responsibility to ensure that the care was provided, and provided adequately/correctly. That's why nursing school involves learning to become competent in all levels/phases of direct care. It's not so much a matter of being "willing" to do any type of care "in order to gain confidence/cooperation" of colleagues as it is that it's your job in an acute care setting. That knowledge and those skills are a basic element of RN licensure and, since all NPs are licensed RNs, that is a basic element of your education and licensure as an RN even if you are planning on becoming an NP and never getting your hands dirty again.
    Anoetos and ruralnurs like this.
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    How do you like your job Zen? I aspire to be a Psych. NP, but am a bit fearful of the job market for that specialty. What are your thoughts on that?
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    With all the wars, and as messed up as everything is, there should always be a great job market.
    mwg60 likes this.
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    If I have a masters degree and am applying towards the pre-specialty PMHNP track I know that I do not need to take the GRE. However, Vanderbilt only awards you a score of 1000 if you chose to opt out of the GRE. I have a 3.4 GPA without about 5 prereqs that I intend on making A's in. Do you think I could get accepted wihtout having to take the GRE?
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    I'm studying psych NP after my RN-bSN (already done 2006). I didn't like much of the "gore" of nursing school, but I got through it. You learn to breathe through your mouth, and sit down if you get dizzy. But I did want to say, even as a psych nurse, you will probably see your share of poop and puke...wiped on the walls in a message just for you. No, seriously, psych usually has less "blood & guts" but its drawback is that many states are cutting mental health and psych can be extremely dangerous about 10-40% of the time, depending on where you work. It hasn't stopped me though...I hated the lifting most of all with med-surg!
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    Hey Zenman and RobRN,

    Guy working in psych as an RN and just started a Psych NP program; are either of you in a program yet? The workload so far is doable, but was wondering if you heard of the implications of Dep't of Education Code 600.9 for online programs? Seems like this could put a quick damper on online programs. As usual I find the nursing faculty to be a little on the ****** side.


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