Physician Hostility - page 6

Why are so many physicians threatened and hostile toward NPs? What are the strategies in dealing with these types of professionals,and in what ways can we make it easier to practice together?... Read More

  1. by   yersinia21
    Quote from fergus51
    Again, I am just a regular nurse, but if NPs don't get any real patho training, why are they the ones teaching the residents patho on our unit? I haven't worked with many NPs previously, but the two we have here are excellent.
    You probably dont even understand what real pathophys is. Give me an example of an NP teaching a resident about pathophys and I'll show you a weak resident.

    Your hospital must be draw a very weak resident pool, meaning that its either in the stix or is full of IMGs from foreign countries because american grads didnt want to match there.
  2. by   LolaRN
    Thanks. I am so mad right now I don't know if I can go to sleep. I was just reading it for the funny ER stories but for some reason, decided to see what else they were talking about. It doesn't sound like his fellow doctors are in agreement with him either. Some people.
  3. by   Dave ARNP
    Don't worry guy...
    This is just HER opinion.

    And you know what they say about opinions. :hatparty:

    -Dave


    Quote from tjjs
    Thanks. I am so mad right now I don't know if I can go to sleep. I was just reading it for the funny ER stories but for some reason, decided to see what else they were talking about. It doesn't sound like his fellow doctors are in agreement with him either. Some people.
  4. by   LolaRN
    Quote from yersinia21
    You probably dont even understand what real pathophys is. Give me an example of an NP teaching a resident about pathophys and I'll show you a weak resident.

    Your hospital must be draw a very weak resident pool, meaning that its either in the stix or is full of IMGs from foreign countries because american grads didnt want to match there.
    In our nursing class, not NP but RN, we had a man who was a DR, who taught A&P, Patho, etc at the university who wanted to be an RN. He was the first to say that the nursing was demanding in a way that being a MD wasn't. Both were hard. Many RN's are able to be DR's if they want to. What you may not realize is that nursing is a rewarding profession and that we have to opportunity to spend time with the patient and family in ways that DR's do not. I spend many hours explaining to patients and their families what the DR thought that they had explained adequately. Families need nurses and NP's who can take more time with them. It sounds like you need to be a team player.
  5. by   yersinia21
    Quote from tjjs
    In our nursing class, not NP but RN, we had a man who was a DR, who taught A&P, Patho, etc at the university who wanted to be an RN. He was the first to say that the nursing was demanding in a way that being a MD wasn't. Both were hard. Many RN's are able to be DR's if they want to. What you may not realize is that nursing is a rewarding profession and that we have to opportunity to spend time with the patient and family in ways that DR's do not. I spend many hours explaining to patients and their families what the DR thought that they had explained adequately. Families need nurses and NP's who can take more time with them. It sounds like you need to be a team player.
    Uhhh...exactly what does this have to do with anything I said in the quote?

    I asked about specific pathophysiology that NPs would teach to residents.
  6. by   LolaRN
    Quote from yersinia21
    Uhhh...exactly what does this have to do with anything I said in the quote?

    I asked about specific pathophysiology that NPs would teach to residents.

    Just read the message. It is a response to all of your issues that you seem to be bringing. I don't have enough time to include all of the rantings.
  7. by   yersinia21
    Verbal attacks removed.
    Last edit by nilepoc on Mar 1, '04 : Reason: Verbal attacks were removed.
  8. by   LolaRN
    What color is the sky in your world? I have dealt with enough nuts for one night so this is it for me. This Dr. thought that studying nursing would make him better at all of the roles he is in. He is what some call a life long learner (a good quality in a medical person don't you think?) See ya. You will have to find someone else to argue with.
  9. by   Dave ARNP
    Deleted by user
    Last edit by MD Terminator on Feb 29, '04
  10. by   fergus51
    Quote from yersinia21
    You probably dont even understand what real pathophys is. Give me an example of an NP teaching a resident about pathophys and I'll show you a weak resident.

    Your hospital must be draw a very weak resident pool, meaning that its either in the stix or is full of IMGs from foreign countries because american grads didnt want to match there.
    Are you on something? Trolling about for fun? This is a major hospital with a level 3 NICU, not in the stix or substandard by any definition. Unfortunately residents don't usually come to the floor knowing it all. If they did, why bother with a residency in the first place?

    As far as not understanding what patho is... Well, even I can understand a sheet with names saying which NP will be teaching which group of residents....
  11. by   fergus51
    Probably a frustrated med student.... A nurse must have been mean to him in clinical
  12. by   karenG
    Quote from PA-C, DO
    The reason that physicians are hostile toward NP's is that NP's attempt to seek more autonomy when their training does not prepare them to be solo providers. The pathophysiologic knowledge necessary to be a medical provider is simply well above that taught in any NP program. At least in PA school they teach the basics of the medical model, and they humbly agree that they need supervision to provide the best care. NP's will slowly alienate all state medical boards to the point that the they will push them to urge legislators to repeal the current nursing practice acts. NP's should simply learn that they serve an important role, but one that should be supervised. NP's will only cut off their own tails if they continue to seek autonomy.
    I'm sorry but I beg to differ........ I work automously.... There have been countless studies over here looking at issues of patient safety etc and NP's in many instances come out safer than Docs!! I am not in any way suggesting an NP is better than a doc but we are a safe alternative for patients, we work in a different way.. dare I suggest we are more holistic in our approach?
    I work to my NMC code of conduct which says I should work within my competencies. I am happy to acknowledge when I am out of my depth and call on help.. as should a doctor. My docs would be horrified to think they had to superivise me all the time.. given that I know more about asthma and eyes than they do!! might be interesting!!

    I am an extended and supplementary nurse prescriber.. which means i have fairly extensive prescribing rights. cant prescribe everything yet but I dont want to! I can prescribe the drugs I need to to enable me to work efficiently as a NP.

    Isnt is all about patient choice.. the patient seeing the most appropriate person and being allowed to choose who to see???

    Karen
  13. by   karenG
    Quote from fergus51
    Are you on something? Trolling about for fun? This is a major hospital with a level 3 NICU, not in the stix or substandard by any definition. Unfortunately residents don't usually come to the floor knowing it all. If they did, why bother with a residency in the first place?

    As far as not understanding what patho is... Well, even I can understand a sheet with names saying which NP will be teaching which group of
    residents....

    Fergus.......... I have reported this poster for trolling...........!

    Karen

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