PA/NP to MD Bridge?? - page 3

by Joebird21

25,841 Visits | 39 Comments

Does anybody think that there will ever be a bridge program like that? I think it would be a great idea. Anybody else?... Read More


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    I can see a potential PA to MD/DO bridge (I believe a PA to DO bridge was recently approved actually...maybe a well-informed PA can weigh in). However, I think it's very unlikely for there to be an NP to MD/DO bridge. PAs are trained in the medical model. Their training shares some similarities to the training physicians receive. On the other hand, NP/DNP training shares almost no similarities to medical training. In my opinion, that's one of the main reasons that there will likely never be an NP to MD/DO bridge. The difference between them is too great to bridge without having NPs/DNPs go through the standard med school process.
    PICUPNP likes this.
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    Quote from dgenthusiast
    I can see a potential PA to MD/DO bridge (I believe a PA to DO bridge was recently approved actually...maybe a well-informed PA can weigh in). However, I think it's very unlikely for there to be an NP to MD/DO bridge. PAs are trained in the medical model. Their training shares some similarities to the training physicians receive. On the other hand, NP/DNP training shares almost no similarities to medical training. In my opinion, that's one of the main reasons that there will likely never be an NP to MD/DO bridge. The difference between them is too great to bridge without having NPs/DNPs go through the standard med school process.
    are you an NP, dgenthusiast? either way, what you are saying is completely untrue about NP curricula; the program I attended was directed ENTIRELY from the medical model.....you can argue some semantics based on course titles...sure there is some required nursing fluff in there......but, our core work consisted of intense pathophysiology, pharmacology, a physical diagnosis course and lab......lecture and clinical in pediatrics, adult, geriatrics, psych each respectively (FNP)......already being RNs we had previously completed anatomy, physiology, microbiology and undergraduate bio and chems.......we were taught to formulate differential diagnoses based on a complaint or problem.......and treat appropriately...(MEDICALLY).....so, I don't know what program model you are speaking from....but you can't practice medicine as any kind of provider unless you work 'from a medical model'..........I personally don't care if there is or isn't going to be a bridge program in the future.......I don't need to be considered equal to a physician.....and don't claim to be and am NOT....! I'm just tired of people who don't even practice as an NP or PA or PHYSICIAN.....making claims on what one is or isn't.......NPs and PAs are not physicians.....but......NPs and PAs ARE [trained to provide MEDICAL care for acute and chronic health problems utilizing a variety of therapeutic treatment options......and I'm pretty sure you could say 3 professions that share the same function generally speaking are kinda similar???!!! bottom line is we mid-level providers are out here autonomously and safely and effectively providing primary care to our patients and are pretty darn good at it.......
    Househead4life and pedspnp like this.
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    Quote from BS, NP
    are you an NP, dgenthusiast? either way, what you are saying is completely untrue about NP curricula; the program I attended was directed ENTIRELY from the medical model.....you can argue some semantics based on course titles...sure there is some required nursing fluff in there......but, our core work consisted of intense pathophysiology, pharmacology, a physical diagnosis course and lab......lecture and clinical in pediatrics, adult, geriatrics, psych each respectively (FNP)......already being RNs we had previously completed anatomy, physiology, microbiology and undergraduate bio and chems.......we were taught to formulate differential diagnoses based on a complaint or problem.......and treat appropriately...(MEDICALLY).....so, I don't know what program model you are speaking from....
    The medical model is a strong basis on basic sciences (pharm, path, phys etc) with tens of thousands of hours of clinical training where you work admitting and working up patients.

    About 1/3-1/2 of DNP credits are non-clinical fluff. 3 credits of pharmacology and 3 credits of pathophysiology found in the average DNP or MSN are not "intense." Undergraduate anatomy, phys etc are not doctoral level courses. 1000 (or less) clinical training hours are not a lot of hours.

    You did not attend a program based on the medical model. You attended a program based on the nursing model.

    The programs are so disparate that there could not be a bridge program.
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    NP education would maybe knock off 2 science courses needed in medical school and that is assuming that those courses are taught at the medical school level. So it would still take a full 2 years to achieve the science coursework needed. NPs have clinical experience in ONE area, so they would still need to do all the other rotations which would take another 2 years... so even counting in the previous education, it would still be a 4 year program (unless you did one of the few 3 year programs for those going into primary care). I can see PA school knocking off a year because PA students do a lot more of the science coursework and a lot more of the rotations, but the education would have specifically dedicated to PA-MD students as you couldn't just knock off year 1 - you'd have to retake the coursework but abbreviated.
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    Quote from wowza
    The medical model is a strong basis on basic sciences (pharm, path, phys etc) with tens of thousands of hours of clinical training where you work admitting and working up patients.

    About 1/3-1/2 of DNP credits are non-clinical fluff. 3 credits of pharmacology and 3 credits of pathophysiology found in the average DNP or MSN are not "intense." Undergraduate anatomy, phys etc are not doctoral level courses. 1000 (or less) clinical training hours are not a lot of hours.

    You did not attend a program based on the medical model. You attended a program based on the nursing model.

    The programs are so disparate that there could not be a bridge program.


    thanks for taking the time to delineate the differences and share your insight.....

    to clarify....I'm not trying to imply my coursework was the same as a physicians....I'm saying the content was based on treating a patient from a medical perspective rather than from nursing....as I said the program was DIRECTED from the medical model (we are obviously treating patients medically)...of course there was plenty of nursing integrated into it.....I do not have a DNP.....nor am I advocating the DNP be considered equal to that of medical school...(so, I don't know where that response came from)....I still can't understand how it would clinically benefit me to do it in the first place......in general I see it as a means of applying doctorate credentials behind one's name with the content in place......and I agree there isn't a way to bridge current programs to a medical school follow through.....I was responding to others claims about NPs and PAs that weren't all accurate......there's no need for you to condescend or discredit MY educational experience here......by towering over it with yours......
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    First PA to MD/DO program has now been approved.. takes PA with at least 5 years of experience followed by roughly 2.5 years of school and then residency.
    syndromal65 likes this.
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    Quote from just_cause
    First PA to MD/DO program has now been approved.. takes PA with at least 5 years of experience followed by roughly 2.5 years of school and then residency.
    interesting....where is this program....?
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    Quote from BS, NP
    so....let me get this straight.......NP education = 2 science courses needed in medical school? so, if I go to med school and take 2 classes (does this have to be specific courses, btw?) I'll be equipped to start treating patients...?...now, how did you formulate that equation...???? is that in the 'multi-skilled tech's manual'???

    when you get out of diapers and do more than take somebody a warm blanket, maybe I'll consider your ......
    experienced opinion on this, but even then it's doubtful....
    The NP programs I am familar with require pathophysiology and pharmacology (the rest of the sciences are prerequisites taken at the undergraduate level). Those two classes are integrated into medical school as well as MANY others. Med students take at the doctorate level (and PA students at the master's level usually) anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, microbiology, biochemistry, physical diagnosis, lectures in all areas, and clinicals in all areas. NP school is missing the vast majority of those didactic science courses at the graduate level.

    When did I ever say that if you take 2 courses in medical school that you are fully equipped to start treating patients? I'd appreciate you not putting words in my mouth. I simply stated that very very few MSN courses are directly applicable to the courses taken in medical school.

    And you apparently have no idea what MSTs do so as I can't even remember the last time I took a warm blanket to someone - that's what the nurse aides are for.
    Last edit by foreverLaur on May 26, '10
    syndromal65 likes this.
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    Hey BS,
    The PA-DO bridge is with LECOM. It was created by a DO that was first a PA.
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    Quote from UNCpsycGuy
    Hey BS,
    The PA-DO bridge is with LECOM. It was created by a DO that was first a PA.
    hey...thanks...UNC guy...!! just curious....


    you gotten into the BSN program yet....????
    Last edit by XB9S on May 28, '10 : Reason: TOS


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