NP's please helpppp

  1. 0
    Hi everybody, i have a BS degree in biochemical pharmacology and thinking of a career change into nursing.. getting my RN degree first and then straight through to the NP program

    I shadowed some NP's and liked what they do..

    however, i wanted to ask you some questions:

    1- is it very difficult to get a job as an NP / FNP right out of school.. do you have to work as an RN for a few years ???? before or not

    2- I was hoping to get a job in a Dr's office as an FNP then after a few years get into teaching or administration.

    3- I love what NP's do .. history taking, etc... everything teh Dr. does pretty much with little supervision from the Dr's .. but i honostly have to say .. i dont know how i would react to cleaning up vomit.. or urin, stool....i have never done that before... would I be doing these things as a NP.. or not

    4 - are the hours flexible.. i was told they are.. my husband has a very hectic schedule with work and i need more flexible hours.. for when we decide to have a family

    5- do the Dr's treat you as bad as the public thinks.. or are you respected by Dr.s as a peers.....,

    6- how about patients do they value your openion.. or do they have the old school mentality that they want to see a Dr. ?

    Please let me know .. teh answers to the above questions.. as soon as possible ... i only have a few days to make my decision...

    any feedback would be appreciated.. especially if it's to the above questions..

    thanks so much,

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  2. 4 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from moniku
    Hi everybody, i have a BS degree in biochemical pharmacology and thinking of a career change into nursing.. getting my RN degree first and then straight through to the NP program

    I shadowed some NP's and liked what they do..

    however, i wanted to ask you some questions:

    1- is it very difficult to get a job as an NP / FNP right out of school.. do you have to work as an RN for a few years ???? before or not

    2- I was hoping to get a job in a Dr's office as an FNP then after a few years get into teaching or administration.

    3- I love what NP's do .. history taking, etc... everything teh Dr. does pretty much with little supervision from the Dr's .. but i honostly have to say .. i dont know how i would react to cleaning up vomit.. or urin, stool....i have never done that before... would I be doing these things as a NP.. or not

    4 - are the hours flexible.. i was told they are.. my husband has a very hectic schedule with work and i need more flexible hours.. for when we decide to have a family

    5- do the Dr's treat you as bad as the public thinks.. or are you respected by Dr.s as a peers.....,

    6- how about patients do they value your openion.. or do they have the old school mentality that they want to see a Dr. ?

    Please let me know .. teh answers to the above questions.. as soon as possible ... i only have a few days to make my decision...

    any feedback would be appreciated.. especially if it's to the above questions..

    thanks so much,

    To answer some of your questions:
    1. It depends on your location. There are many FNP jobs, however, most require experience. Most programs require at least 1yr of RN experience to get in.

    3. You never know what situation you may end up in as a NURSE period. FNPs practice in a variety of settings. I have been in settings where the NP brings his/her own patients to the room and cleans the room up when the patient leaves. So you never know!


    4. Alot of NPs do work a 9-5 per se. Again, it just depends on the practice setting. There are NPs who may work for a nursing home and work on weekends.

    5/6. There are Docs out there who haven't necessarily come to terms yet with Nurses being Practitioners. Where I live, its a Physician Assistant dominated area. Nurse Practitioners are still working very hard to achieve and maintain the respect we deserve. Even patients have a hard time putting Nurses in the role of Practitioner. You may have several patients who adamantly refuse to see a NP. Education is the key! Again, it depends on where you are. There are some Docs who respect our practice.

    I would definitely suggest working as a RN first! Make sure Nursing is for you.

    If I can help you further please feel free to PM me! or email sdeewalker@msn.com
  4. 0
    Quote from moniku
    Hi everybody, i have a BS degree in biochemical pharmacology and thinking of a career change into nursing.. getting my RN degree first and then straight through to the NP program

    I shadowed some NP's and liked what they do..

    however, i wanted to ask you some questions:

    1- is it very difficult to get a job as an NP / FNP right out of school.. do you have to work as an RN for a few years ???? before or not

    2- I was hoping to get a job in a Dr's office as an FNP then after a few years get into teaching or administration.


    3- I love what NP's do .. history taking, etc... everything teh Dr. does pretty much with little supervision from the Dr's .. but i honostly have to say .. i dont know how i would react to cleaning up vomit.. or urin, stool....i have never done that before... would I be doing these things as a NP.. or not

    4 - are the hours flexible.. i was told they are.. my husband has a very hectic schedule with work and i need more flexible hours.. for when we decide to have a family


    5- do the Dr's treat you as bad as the public thinks.. or are you respected by Dr.s as a peers.....,

    6- how about patients do they value your openion.. or do they have the old school mentality that they want to see a Dr. ?


    Please let me know .. teh answers to the above questions.. as soon as possible ... i only have a few days to make my decision...

    any feedback would be appreciated.. especially if it's to the above questions..

    thanks so much,

    1. As previously stated, it depends upon where you are located. The FNP is the most highly marketable NP choice in my area. Yes, you should work as an RN prior to going on to the NP arena. You should include ER, ICU, OB, Peds, CCU, ....

    2. Yes, you can secure a position in an office/clinic setting. Many NP's will go on and teach.


    3. Well, sometimes you are unable to escape the bodily fluids like this. I have been examining a patient and get vomited on and vomit right with 'em. You should be able to pitch in and help the patient in any way possible. Nothing is beneath you.



    4. Yes, hours in a clinic especially are generally flexible. I worked 8-4 in my clinic. BUT, the rounding at the hospital BEFORE clinic patients and AFTER clinic, made for a VERY long day. Then, you have emergencies DURING clinic that require you to leave the clinic and that puts you behind and makes for an even longer day.


    5. Depends on where you are. I have had physicians ingnore me and never consider interacting with me. I have had the divine pleasure, however, to be associated with physicians who support the advanced practice nurse and we work together very well.


    6. Some do, some do not. Some of the older patients would never even consider going to a physician after they have seen me. I have teens who want me over the physician. And, I have those who see me and STILL stop the physician in the hallway asking about this or that and wanting tx after I have spent an hour with them.

    I hope I have helped you. Good luck in your career choice!!
  5. 0
    Thanks so much for your feedback.. I appreciate any more advice anyone else has.. the more the better..
    as far as PA's .. it's funny , i really thought it was the other way around. that NP's recieved more respect and have more autonomy vs. PA's .. in Rochester, NY anyways.. hmm I was also told NP's can prescribe meds but PAS cant.. is this true ?
  6. 0
    Hi there ! I am not an NP *yet* (I start next week in an FNP program) but I can tell you that I am VERY glad I am getting some experience under my belt before starting school. If you want to get the most experience in the shortest amount of time, I would highly recommend the ER. I have seen things and learned a thought process that will be invaulable to me as I proceed through school. You also learn to perfect your assessment skills and even though it sounds like common sense....you need to increase your patient interaction skills. You must approach different patients in a different way, and the only way to learn this is through repeated patient interaction.


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