NP w/no desire for RN? - page 19

Well, not so much NO desire...but are there any NP's out there that wanted to become (and had their sights set on being an NP from day 1) an NP with no real 'drive' to be an RN first? My cousin is... Read More

  1. by   krisssy
    Quote from zenman
    Ok, I went to her site and when I saw her picture with her hand under her chin, I just had to get out of there, LOL!

    I know "how' she can teach without any bedside experience...many do...
    HOW can she teach without bedside experience?
  2. by   sirI
    Krisssy, since you brought up Parse, how do you think she can teach theory effectively without any bedside experience?
    Last edit by sirI on Mar 1, '06
  3. by   krisssy
    Quote from siri
    Krisssy, since you brought up Parse, how do you think she can teach theory effectively without any bedside experience?
    I don't know HOW, BUT Zenman knows HOW, so why won't he tell us HOW?
  4. by   zenman
    Quote from krisssy
    I don't know HOW, BUT Zenman knows HOW, so why won't he tell us HOW?
    How...very "badly."
  5. by   krisssy
    Quote from zenman
    How...very "badly."
    Correct me if I am wrong. You are saying that her teaching of her theory on Becoming is bad , because she was never a bedside nurse. Well , that could be. I would have to ask experienced nurses who have taken her course on Becoming - given by her. You and I have not taken the course, so we can't know for absolutely sure.

    Maybe I will conduct a reasearch project on this. Can nurses without bedside experience be good theorists and teachers of their nursing theory?

    I am not saying that I disagree with you. I am just saying that I don't know the answer to this question, and that your initial answer, when you looked at her picture, sounded rude to me.

    Look, I just made the comment , because I thought it related to this thread-NP w/no desire for RN. She did get her RN. She just didn't use it for bedside nursing.

    Personally, I am glad I have my RN. I am also glad I was a teacher for 25 years. It gives me certain abilities that relate to nursing very well. These years are going to pass regardless of what I do. I may as well do something that I am reaLY INTERESTED IN. Look, when I get my master's, I may deside to be a bedside nurse. Who knows?

    Krisssy
    Last edit by krisssy on Mar 2, '06
  6. by   zenman
    Quote from krisssy
    Correct me if I am wrong. You are saying that her teaching of her theory on Becoming is bad , because she was never a bedside nurse.
    We're losing something over several posts so let me just say that I think no one should teach nursing unless they have done it. Granted, just teaching theory is probably less of a sin than trying to teach other aspects of nursing but if she had a few years of actual experience how much better could her theory be? When I was working on my master we had to develop our own nursing theory with a partner. It certainly helped for both of us to have "experienced" nursing in this case.

    I am just saying that I don't know the answer to this question, and that your initial answer, when you looked at her picture, sounded rude to me.
    Posed pictures with your hand by your chin are never flattering!

    I'm leaving for north Thailand now for a week so don't get impatient if I don't respond till I get back!
  7. by   krisssy
    Quote from zenman
    We're losing something over several posts so let me just say that I think no one should teach nursing unless they have done it. Granted, just teaching theory is probably less of a sin than trying to teach other aspects of nursing but if she had a few years of actual experience how much better could her theory be? When I was working on my master we had to develop our own nursing theory with a partner. It certainly helped for both of us to have "experienced" nursing in this case.



    Posed pictures with your hand by your chin are never flattering!

    I'm leaving for north Thailand now for a week so don't get impatient if I don't respond till I get back!
    In my theory class, my group is reading an article written by people from Thailand. The article was translated into English. In the translation, would that cause the article to be sort of rambling and difficult to understand? Is it difficult to translate from Tai to English? The article is called Influence of Selected factors and self-care Behavior on abdominal distention in Patients with Abdominal Surgery, I like the satudy, but my group finds it rambling and difficult to read. I thought it could be from the translation. Is that possible?I am assuming that you speak English and Tai, which isn't right. Do you?

    Krisssy
  8. by   sirI
    please, we all have veered off topic. so, let's get back to the "np with no desire for rn".

    thank you.
  9. by   krisssy
    Quote from krisssy
    In my theory class, my group is reading an article written by people from Thailand. The article was translated into English. In the translation, would that cause the article to be sort of rambling and difficult to understand? Is it difficult to translate from Tai to English? The article is called Influence of Selected factors and self-care Behavior on abdominal distention in Patients with Abdominal Surgery, I like the satudy, but my group finds it rambling and difficult to read. I thought it could be from the translation. Is that possible?I am assuming that you speak English and Tai, which isn't right. Do you?

    Krisssy
    Can you please PM me regarding this? Krisssy
  10. by   HealthyRN
    I have been following this thread for quite some time, but I can't remember if this information has been posted in the past. If it has, I apologize for overlooking this. I recently came across an article in "The Nurse Practitioner" journal. It is the December 2005 edition (vol. 30., no.12, pp. 53-56). The link to the journal's site is http://www.tnpj.com . I don't have a link to the online article because I'm not a member and I only have a hard copy. The article is titled "Does RN Experience Relate to NP Clinical Skills".

    To give a brief overview, a small study was conducted to determine if there is a relationship between duration of prior RN experience and NP clinical skills. In this study, no significant correlation between RN experience and NP skills competence was found. When collaborating physicians assessed the skill level of the NPs, a negative correlation between RN experience and NP skills was found. More RN experience was assocated with a lower score of skills competence (Rich, 2005).

    Now I am NOT trying to say that RN experience is worthless for those who want to go on to become NPs. This study had several design and validity issues and more research definately needs to be done in this area. Assessment of skills by a physician is probably not the best method of ensuring competence. However, I just wanted to throw this out there because it does seem to be one of the only studies of its kind.
  11. by   Selke
    Quote from katyosu2006
    ....
    Now I am NOT trying to say that RN experience is worthless for those who want to go on to become NPs. This study had several design and validity issues and more research definately needs to be done in this area. Assessment of skills by a physician is probably not the best method of ensuring competence. However, I just wanted to throw this out there because it does seem to be one of the only studies of its kind.

    I think prior nursing experience is more important in advanced practice specialities such as adult critical care, CRNA, NICU - neonatal resuscitation/transport specialty, midwifery. Nursing experience in these areas provides a foundation of assessment, skills, and intervention to build an advanced practice upon.

    FNP, adult NP, psych -- I don't see how med/surg nursing experience, even ambulatory care experience, gives you a skill set that transfers well to advanced practice. Unless you have ER experience -- there might be analogies between what people come into the ER and clinic for, and in the ER you're working with the providers who are making diagnoses and prescribing treatment, so you would learn quite a bit. APRNs are assessing pts on a more extensive level than in plain ol' nursing, and they are making diagnosis and treatment plans. Nurses need to be able to assess whether these are right for the patient, but are not originating the treatment. Quite a different set of skills.

    I have no doubt that DE students can and do successfully become APRNs, but the ones I listen to have horrific anxiety levels because of their lack of experience. I avoid saying, well, you could have gone to nursing school like myself and many others did, worked a bit, then applied to grad school ... so don't complain to me. I paid my dues. I suspect a few years after graduation we are all at the same level of competence and confidence.

    Perhaps studies should be done, rather than generically looking at advanced practice, looking at specialties instead, whether or not one has prior nursing experience, then what kind, in what kind of setting, how many years, how these things impact confidence and skill level after graduation compared to DE graduates.

    I know my experience is valuable and I won't allow anybody to belittle or downgrade me or disrespect me for being who I am. As a nurse I would be very uncomfortable working with a young new DE graduate giving me orders. Esp if this graduate felt like s/he was better than me because she didn't waste her time being a nurse before going to school.
  12. by   brownrice
    Very interesting article, THANKS for sharing!

    I have a friend who obtained a Fine Arts B.A. degree, then completed another undergrad degree as an accelerated BSN, and graduated top of her class. Went straight to become an NP, and just graduated. She passed her boards without problem, obtained a great job, is doing well and loving it. She is making great money, has no hangups about never having had any prior nursing experience, and she is well respected by her colleagues.

    To me, hearing about people's experiences firsthand speaks very loudly. We can all surmise about this and that, but how bout it for more folks out there sharing other success stories like this? This is not my only NP success story...I know of others.
  13. by   krisssy
    To Update,

    I am in my first semester of MHPNP Master's program. I am taking Theory, and I love it. My advisor told me that I don't need experience, because the school will teach me how to be a PNP. That is the point of me going there. That is her and my school's opinion. I don't know if they feel the same way about other specialties. You are all entitled to your opinions. I don't know for sure what my opinion on the issue is yet.

    If I continue part time, I will finish in five years. I am taking it a day at a time. These years are going to pass regardless of what I do. I may as well do something that I am really interested in.

    Who knows what I will do. Maybe I will speed up the program. Maybe I will get a job in psych or another area while still in school. Who knows? Meanwhile I am happy, and I am loving what I am doing, and I am doing it a day at a time. Krisssy RN MA MS to b i hope someday

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