NP w/no desire for RN? - page 14

Well, not so much NO desire...but are there any NP's out there that wanted to become (and had their sights set on being an NP from day 1) an NP with no real 'drive' to be an RN first? My cousin is... Read More

  1. by   rn-tam2
    Quote from carolinapooh
    HA HA HA HA!!! They're already peeved about PT's being Dr. and pharmacists being Dr. I LOVE IT!!! 2015 - that's not too far away....awesome!

    You know, doctors sound like a VERY insecure bunch.....not all of them, mind you, but MAN, do they WHINE....
    The clinical practice doctorate is coming to my school within the next 2 years, within 2-5 years the MSN for NP's will no longer be an option. The majority of nurses that I am in the BSN completion program with now who are planning to go on to become NP's are excited about this change, who really cares what the MD's think. That is not even the point. But an interesting aside is that the hospital I work at from the nurse Executive level says that it will not be paying these "doctors" any more than current NP's. She happens to have a PhD by the way---don't ya love politics. Maybe that's just a statement to appease other concerned parties that may be worrrying about this change HA HA.
  2. by   krisssy
    Quote from zenman
    Couldn't said it better myself
    I understood the first part, and maybe i needed the second part repeated in Siri's words , so I can hear it over and over in my mind. Whatever you dream, you shall be. Thank you both. I received a long letter from my advisor and my professor, and I am going to put three uninterrupted hours into this course using their advice from 3-6 today. Thank you for your encouragement. I will keep that in mind when I get frustrated and feel like giving up. "Whatever you dream you shall be." Krisssy
  3. by   zenman
    Quote from krisssy
    I understood the first part, and maybe i needed the second part repeated in Siri's words , so I can hear it over and over in my mind. Whatever you dream, you shall be. Thank you both. I received a long letter from my advisor and my professor, and I am going to put three uninterrupted hours into this course using their advice from 3-6 today. Thank you for your encouragement. I will keep that in mind when I get frustrated and feel like giving up. "Whatever you dream you shall be." Krisssy
    Just don't tell those folks who don't believe in integrative medicine that "the world is as you dream it" came from some shamans!:chuckle
  4. by   sirI
    Quote from zenman
    Just don't tell those folks who don't believe in integrative medicine that "the world is as you dream it" came from some shamans!:chuckle
    ......and, two holistic NPs.
  5. by   Selke
    Krissy,
    I don't remember details of your story and can't go back and read old posts, but is there any way you can take classes from a brick and mortars school of nursing in your area? Even if you have to drive an hour or more to get there? I think many of your problems would be resolved in a timely manner if you were face to face with your instructors, in a school with physical resources for students, for older and returning students, with a library and information services complete with librarians and tech support people who exist just to help students like yourself ... A real school of nursing would have resources to help you reenter the work world with refresher classes you can take, and mental health services for students, perhaps workshops on study skills, &c. A distance program might not work for you. Nursing has changed a LOT since 1969, more than a hospital new grad orientation program could cover. Krissy, please get to a brick and mortar nursing school and get what you need. You need actual classes with clinicals!

    So much of your distress seems to come from technical issues that can be solved, things you can master with some effort. They aren't that hard, but you need someone to show you how to do them, demystify them.

    I'm an older returning MSN student in a school which does not specifically have services for older or returning students (their preferred student is young, brilliant and elite), but I've found other help, such as the tech support person and a wonderful librarian, and others. I've had run ins all last semester with faculty over my not knowing how to electronically do something or incorrectly turning in an assignment via email, &c. (And these are women my age or older ... go figure, you'd think they'd be a bit kinder to me!) I just grovel and say I've been out of school for 16 years ... I have never done this before. The classroom computer revolution occurred in the last 10 yrs or so. Blackboard, online discussion groups, turning in assignments via email, using attachments, online exams, students extensively communicating via emails and class email lists, computerized library searches, powerpoints ... Yikes! As I said, I'm thankful for the tech support and the librarian and a few very young students who helped me, the old lady in the program, with eye rolls ...

    Computers literally open up the whole world once you know how to work them ... The best part is the library searching I can now do from my laptop at home, perusing a world famous library's holdings and printing out the articles I need at home, instead of spending hours in stacks, searching. I appreciate Blackboard, too. I naturally think and write best at a keyboard, so many aspects of computers fit well with me, but I know little from a tech perspective and still can't figure out many programs on my computer. All APA is is a way to format papers; you can find guides online. Next I need to learn about digital voice recorders ... they interface with your computer, analog tape based recorders aren't recommended now. I have to use powerpoint this semester and have never created such a thing before. I'll find help. Speaking up in class is what terrifies me. I've found a Toastmasters group to get speaking experience .... But now I appreciate ppt class notes: I can spend more time listening and less time frantically writing as in days of yore, in which I probably missed a lot of important information. The teacher puts the important stuff in the ppt and tests pretty much come from those, the reading is supplemental.

    The suggestion of hiring a teenager to help with computer stuff is good.

    PLEASE don't give up Krissy! I've been rooting for you all along. I do have 16 years experience as an RN, unlike you, but like you, I'm an old lady and fight insecurity and fears every day that I'm too old, not smart enough, or good enough to take this path. We can do it!

    Sending you hugs and support.
  6. by   krisssy
    Quote from Anon Nurse
    Krissy,
    I don't remember details of your story and can't go back and read old posts, but is there any way you can take classes from a brick and mortars school of nursing in your area? Even if you have to drive an hour or more to get there? I think many of your problems would be resolved in a timely manner if you were face to face with your instructors, in a school with physical resources for students, for older and returning students, with a library and information services complete with librarians and tech support people who exist just to help students like yourself ... A real school of nursing would have resources to help you reenter the work world with refresher classes you can take, and mental health services for students, perhaps workshops on study skills, &c. A distance program might not work for you. Nursing has changed a LOT since 1969, more than a hospital new grad orientation program could cover. Krissy, please get to a brick and mortar nursing school and get what you need. You need actual classes with clinicals!

    So much of your distress seems to come from technical issues that can be solved, things you can master with some effort. They aren't that hard, but you need someone to show you how to do them, demystify them.

    I'm an older returning MSN student in a school which does not specifically have services for older or returning students (their preferred student is young, brilliant and elite), but I've found other help, such as the tech support person and a wonderful librarian, and others. I've had run ins all last semester with faculty over my not knowing how to electronically do something or incorrectly turning in an assignment via email, &c. (And these are women my age or older ... go figure, you'd think they'd be a bit kinder to me!) I just grovel and say I've been out of school for 16 years ... I have never done this before. The classroom computer revolution occurred in the last 10 yrs or so. Blackboard, online discussion groups, turning in assignments via email, using attachments, online exams, students extensively communicating via emails and class email lists, computerized library searches, powerpoints ... Yikes! As I said, I'm thankful for the tech support and the librarian and a few very young students who helped me, the old lady in the program, with eye rolls ...

    Computers literally open up the whole world once you know how to work them ... The best part is the library searching I can now do from my laptop at home, perusing a world famous library's holdings and printing out the articles I need at home, instead of spending hours in stacks, searching. I appreciate Blackboard, too. I naturally think and write best at a keyboard, so many aspects of computers fit well with me, but I know little from a tech perspective and still can't figure out many programs on my computer. All APA is is a way to format papers; you can find guides online. Next I need to learn about digital voice recorders ... they interface with your computer, analog tape based recorders aren't recommended now. I have to use powerpoint this semester and have never created such a thing before. I'll find help. Speaking up in class is what terrifies me. I've found a Toastmasters group to get speaking experience .... But now I appreciate ppt class notes: I can spend more time listening and less time frantically writing as in days of yore, in which I probably missed a lot of important information. The teacher puts the important stuff in the ppt and tests pretty much come from those, the reading is supplemental.

    The suggestion of hiring a teenager to help with computer stuff is good.

    PLEASE don't give up Krissy! I've been rooting for you all along. I do have 16 years experience as an RN, unlike you, but like you, I'm an old lady and fight insecurity and fears every day that I'm too old, not smart enough, or good enough to take this path. We can do it!

    Sending you hugs and support.
    Anon Nurse, Siri, Zenman, Jeepgirl and everyone else who have supported me through this, thank you so much. There is a reason that I have to go to an online school. I remarried in July, and my husband wants to live half the year in NY and half the year in Fla., so this was the only way I could do it. I did take your advice, and I emailed my professor with a copy to my advisor. They both sent long letters trying to help me. So I am going to continue trying. The computer tech support and the librarian support at this school is very good. I think I can do it, but I do need support, and between the school and allnurses, I think i can do it. I am not ready to give up yet! Thanks again! Krisssy
  7. by   krisssy
    Quote from siri
    hello, krisssy,

    i feel your frustration throughout this post and from cyberspace.

    you have been out of nursing school for many many years and i think you are feeling this lack of rn experience.

    why not take a position in a unit even if it is not psych related and gather some rn experience? this would greatly help you to brush up on your rn experience. now, you will see many on here who think rn experience is not necessary for np school. i am one who disagrees with this.

    you are feeling, i think, a little overwhelmed about the entire np program, not just the lack of adequate computer skills.......yes?

    have you considered working as an rn for a little while just to gain experience in physical assessments, medication administration including the myriad of drugs available, gaining an astute insight into critical thinking, brushing up on the patient plan of care, sharpening your diagnostic skills.

    i would not volunteer for this will never get you the experience you need and would not be something that would carry weight on your resume under experience.

    most institutions/entities/hospitals will want the np after graduation to have a concrete background as an rn. but, they all do not require this. you could get lucky and unpon completion of your np program find a job like you want right off the bat. but, why take the chance?

    these ideas are just my opinion. i cannot even advise you to shelve your np program for now. only you know in your heart what you really need to do.

    i do wish you much luck in whatever you choose. you are a determined individual and i admire that. :icon_hug:
    i just sent in an application to a local cardaic and med surg hospital to be a comfort care provider or a nurse extender. these jobs are usually given to nursing students. if i do well, maybe they will hire me as an rn while i am going to school. i am only taking one course at a time. what do you think? i do not feel qualified to work as an rn without some more experience.

    krisssy rn ma ms to b maybe
  8. by   spionkop1892
    Yes we have the same question. I am currently in my junior year to recieve my BS degree. I have no desire to work as a staff nurse, but rather continue right on to get my masters degree. I really dont have much time to decide because my mind has to be made up by September( my senior year) to apply to master's level schools. My even bigger problem is that im only 20 and by the time i am done with my NP I will be only 23 and patients really wont respect my judgement at such a young age...
  9. by   sirI
    Quote from krisssy
    I just sent in an application to a local cardaic and med surg hospital to be a comfort care provider or a nurse extender. These jobs are usually given to nursing students. If I do well, maybe they will hire me as an RN while I am going to school. I am only taking one course at a time. What do you think? I do not feel qualified to work as an RN without some more experience.

    Krisssy RN MA MS to b maybe
    I think any experience as a nurse will help you, Krisssy. And, you know RN experience is what you need. Yes, maybe you can ease back into the nursing arena this way and they will hire you.

    Glad you are taking it a little slower. Only you know what you can do. How much of a course load you can handle.
  10. by   krisssy
    Quote from siri
    I think any experience as a nurse will help you, Krisssy. And, you know RN experience is what you need. Yes, maybe you can ease back into the nursing arena this way and they will hire you.

    Glad you are taking it a little slower. Only you know what you can do. How much of a course load you can handle.
    Does a part time nurse extender job and one course sound reasonable to you Siri? Thanks Krisssy
  11. by   sirI
    Quote from krisssy
    Does a part time nurse extender job and one course sound reasonable to you Siri? Thanks Krisssy
    Krisssy, you are an individual, seperate and unique from all others. What is reasonable for one will not be reasaonable for another and so on. Only you know what you can do.

    I tried a full load many years ago. Thought I could do it and almost failed in my attempts. I would never, NEVER do that again. I was younger then and am wiser now.

    Hmmmm, wisdom does come with age.

    I think your plan will work for you.
  12. by   krisssy
    Quote from spionkop1892
    Yes we have the same question. I am currently in my junior year to recieve my BS degree. I have no desire to work as a staff nurse, but rather continue right on to get my masters degree. I really dont have much time to decide because my mind has to be made up by September( my senior year) to apply to master's level schools. My even bigger problem is that im only 20 and by the time i am done with my NP I will be only 23 and patients really wont respect my judgement at such a young age...
    You know as I am sitting here studying for my first graduate course in a MHPNP Program, I have been thinking of your question. I am a former teacher. Teachers get a job in their specialty upon graduation from undergraduate school. They have five years to get their master's degree. They cannot get certified without a master's degree and three years of teaching experience. I really don't want to be a nurse practitioner. I just want to be a psychiatric nurse. But I cannot get a job as a psychiatric nurse without med surg experience. I don't want to be a med surg nurse. So I am getting an, MS degree to be a psychiatric nurse practitioner, and meanwhile I am looking for a job as a nurse extender which is a job for student nurses, just so I can get experience. I received my RN a long time ago. I believe that new RNs from BS programs should be able to get a job in their specialty field whatever that may be and be expected to get a masters in that specialty in a required number of years. Then if that nurse wants to become a nurse practitioner in that specialty, she can get it while she works or she can take a leave of absence. I think going from school to be a nurse practitioner, with no experience, is what you are being forced to do, because there are no master's programs in specialties without being a nurse practitioner. I think the whole thing needs to be changed. But that is just my opinion. I realize that my situation is kind of unique, because i graduated such a long time ago. I have been noticing that more hospitals are hiring new grads straight into specialties and giving residencies. If i could find one in psych, I would take it. I have noticed these positions in cardiology, oncology, newborn, and labor and delivery. If you have a speicialty in mind, you may want to try a nurse residency program to get some experience before you become a nurase practitioner. That will certainly make it easier for you to get a job.
  13. by   sirI
    Quote from krisssy
    You know as I am sitting here studying for my first graduate course in a MHPNP Program, I have been thinking of your question. I am a former teacher. Teachers get a job in their specialty upon graduation from undergraduate school. They have five years to get their master's degree. They cannot get certified without a master's degree and three years of teaching experience. I really don't want to be a nurse practitioner. I just want to be a psychiatric nurse. But I cannot get a job as a psychiatric nurse without med surg experience. I don't want to be a med surg nurse. So I am getting an, MS degree to be a psychiatric nurse practitioner, and meanwhile I am looking for a job as a nurse extender which is a job for student nurses, just so I can get experience. I received my RN a long time ago. I believe that new RNs from BS programs should be able to get a job in their specialty field whatever that may be and be expected to get a masters in that specialty in a required number of years. Then if that nurse wants to become a nurse practitioner in that specialty, she can get it while she works or she can take a leave of absence. I think going from school to be a nurse practitioner, with no experience, is what you are being forced to do, because there are no master's programs in specialties without being a nurse practitioner. I think the whole thing needs to be changed. But that is just my opinion. I realize that my situation is kind of unique, because i graduated such a long time ago. I have been noticing that more hospitals are hiring new grads straight into specialties and giving residencies. If i could find one in psych, I would take it. I have noticed these positions in cardiology, oncology, newborn, and labor and delivery. If you have a speicialty in mind, you may want to try a nurse residency program to get some experience before you become a nurase practitioner. That will certainly make it easier for you to get a job.
    But, let's say a teacher doesn't want to teach? Just be a principal or superintendent? They would never be able to without teaching experience first. So, there has to be a logical step-by-step progresson in order to get to your ultimate goal.

    And, I had no idea you really didn't want to be an NP.

    I think you might be more content if you just go to a refresher course, relearn the basics and try for a psych position. Why be an NP if you have no desire?
    Last edit by sirI on Jan 27, '06

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