NP + RN - can I do both part time?

  1. Hi there,

    I'm looking for a little advice. I'm finishing up my DNP program and will begin working as a PMHNP in the summer. I'm really looking forward to it.
    However, I started out in the ED and still love it. I want to always keep my "foot in the door" as a bedside RN.
    Can I work per diem as an RN in an ED while working as an NP elsewhere? I haven't come across any scope of practice mandates that say I HAVE to work to my highest license. Anyone else doing this??
    •  
  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   BostonFNP
    It is possible, sure.

    There are some potential legal concerns so make sure at least you carry your own malpractice insurance.
  4. by   MurseJJ
    A colleague works both as an RN on our neuro step-down and as a neuro NP at a different hospital (at least for now).
  5. by   mmak
    Would you still recommend that I get my own insurance if my PMHNP employer is paying for my insurance?
  6. by   DizzyJon
    Yes, you can do both. You (should) make more money as a PMHNP and it would be more lucrative to just do that full time and then work PRN in the ED. You don't have to make sure you have your own malpractice just because you work both, but you should research as to why some providers recommend carrying your own additional malpractice. In my experience, I have never met a PA/NP covered by an employer insurance who purchased their own policy. The exception is when you have a claims-made policy and your crappy employer doesn't provide tail coverage for instance.
  7. by   elkpark
    Will the insurance provided by your employer cover you when you are working as a bedside RN for another employer?
  8. by   DizzyJon
    Needs two separate policies for two different jobs. An employer policy covering NP work will not cover RN work at another employer.
  9. by   BostonFNP
    You absoluetly need your own policy don't count on your employers especially if working in two roles at two facilities.
  10. by   DizzyJon
    Quote from BostonFNP
    You absoluetly need your own policy don't count on your employers especially if working in two roles at two facilities.
    Any studies or literature to further support this?

    I've seen a few bad cases in which the provider didn't do there homework and got screwed, but for sure the exception and not the rule. If you have proper coverage/limits on an employer paid for policy, then you may not need any additional coverage. It doesn't matter how many employers you have or just one job. Every job needs it's own policy if they are not the same entity and/or scope of practice. How many RNs get there own policy?
  11. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from DizzyJon
    Any studies or literature to further support this?

    I've seen a few bad cases in which the provider didn't do there homework and got screwed, but for sure the exception and not the rule. If you have proper coverage/limits on an employer paid for policy, then you may not need any additional coverage. It doesn't matter how many employers you have or just one job. Every job needs it's own policy if they are not the same entity and/or scope of practice. How many RNs get there own policy?
    Just do a quick google search you will find loads of info. Most employer-based insurance is claims-made and will not cover you if you change jobs unless an additional tail is purchased, is relatively low per-incident (and often distributed among all providers), and will absolutely not cover you for anything that occurs outside of work for that employer.

    All RNs should have it as well and many do, it's fairly cheap (1/6mil policy for about $100/yr for RNs).
  12. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from mmak
    Would you still recommend that I get my own insurance if my PMHNP employer is paying for my insurance?
    In my humble opinion any nurse who is not carrying personal malpractice/liability insurance is asking for trouble. I f you make a mistake bad enough to get you sued YOUR FACILITY WILL NOT BACK YOU UP. It also kind of depends on what you have to lose. If you own a home you can lose it. Attorney retainer fees can run into the thousands. I carry a million dollar policy which is not too expensive since I have carried since I was in nursing school.

    Hppy
  13. by   JerseyBSN
    You can definitely do both. No law against it. There is one issue which the hospital informed me of. If you ever get in a lawsuit you will be held to the standards of your highest degree. I would keep NP and RN insurance for that reason.
  14. by   RuralNurseRN
    This is the law in NC. You can work at a level that is not your highest licensure, but you are legally held to the standards of your highest licensure.
    Last edit by RuralNurseRN on Nov 25 : Reason: spelling

close