NP making six figures? - page 7

Hey all, The general salary figure I hear for NPs disappoints me as I'm sure it disappoints the NPs!! I mean an NP providing primary care which includes prescribing medication, diagnosing... Read More

  1. by   youngRNstudent
    Quote from homeylu2004
    RN's only need a minimum of an ASN, NP's need an MSN, You do the tuition math. I'm only speaking to those that feel becoming a NP will "guarantee" them a higher salary, if you're still doing work as a staff nurse, your NP title won't guarantee you anything but more student loans to repay. (Again that's only in certain areas)... while RN's are in high demand, there is NOT necessarrily a high demand for mid level practioner's. For example, try monster.com, select all states...... type in nuser- over 5,000 jobs across the country. Then type in nurse practioner- 18 jobs across the country.... doesnt take a brain suregeon to see there is not a high demand for that title.
    In California most hospitals will pay your FULL tuition (or at least contribute over 50%) to get your MSN
  2. by   zrmorgan
    go to crna school....you will easily make six figs, and be an NP in most states.
  3. by   lalaxton
    Was not aware that CRNA's were also NP's. Hopefully you mean they have a similar scope of practice and not that they can call themselves one or the other. I don't think with my FNP certification I could call myself a CRNA, in any state.
  4. by   zrmorgan
    Quote from lalaxton
    Was not aware that CRNA's were also NP's. Hopefully you mean they have a similar scope of practice and not that they can call themselves one or the other. I don't think with my FNP certification I could call myself a CRNA, in any state.
    no, under licensing regulations in some states (ARNP). We would not call ourselves FNP either. For example in Wa, our license is ARNP, however we have a specifier on the license that limits our practice to the anesthesia realm. It is similar with CNM's etc. I may not have paid attention to his original post...he may have been interested in specifically FNP...

    "disappoints me as I'm sure it disappoints the NPs!! I mean an NP providing primary care which includes prescribing medication, diagnosing medical illness, and paying substantial malpractice insurance"

    I know he was interested in "prescribing" , "diagnosing" and the reimbursement for those services. I also saw that he was from Wa.

    I know I would feel as comfortable in a clinic as you would in the OR. No disrespect was intended, hopefully it was not perceived.

    z
    Last edit by zrmorgan on Jul 16, '04
  5. by   UCLARN
    BUT being an NP is priceless!!!!! to me at least. :hatparty:


    Quote from homeylu2004
    Whatever make you happy. I grossed $79,000 last year as an RN,shift diffs, overtime, agency rates!!! And I have no loans to repay.
  6. by   zacarias
    Hey all,

    A question for this thread: Do you think NP salaries will increase as primary care MDs net pay decreases? Also, it seems that a major healthcare reform will have to happen (insurance companies brought down to size) before primary care people will make adequate money no?
  7. by   FLCRNA2B
    It seems the supply vs demand is too great, atleast here in Florida. NP's are having a hard time finding a job, especially one they want. The salary's here are $55,000-$75,000. The ones I know seem to work a lot of hours also. It does not seem so good considering the extra schooling and responsibility right now. ARNP programs have become so flexible and easy to accomplish that more and more RN's are taking advantage of it, but the demand is not there yet.
  8. by   stormyocean
    Okay, I've read all of this thread and ya'll seem pretty knowledgeable about this whole NP thing, so help me out, okay?

    I've been an RN for almost 20 yrs., have a MS in a related field, currently work 3 12hr shifts/wk (cardiac specialty areas) as well as a little home health nursing (I've done the home health thing full- and part-time for most of my career and have even had DON positions in home health agencies the past) on the side. I probably will make about $70,000-$75-000 this yr. without too much stress and strain.

    Although, I suspect that I'm a bit older than the majority of you, I'm healthy and strong and in great shape d/t a love of excercise and a personal comitment to never, ever need a cardiologist.

    I'm finally getting my children to function as (somewhat) independent human beings, have a supportive husband, and money for school will not be an issue as long as I can continue to work 12 to 24 hrs./wk.

    I'm thinking about a FNP or ACNP program, and plan to take my time doing it--only 9 credits per semester. My major motivating factors for going back to school are:
    desire for more independence,
    desire for more knowledge,
    desire for more varied kinds of opportunities,
    desire for marketability in more areas of the country.

    Of course money is important, and quality of life is also a very important issue. My worries are:
    ANOTHER masters???
    Just how brutal IS this program anyway?
    Will I realize my goals as stated above?

    In short, is it more trouble than it's worth?

    Also, I didn't see any comments about the psychiatric NP or geriatric NP career paths in this thread. I've heard predictions of huge demand for geriatric NPs in the near future. What do ya'll think?
  9. by   zenman
    Quote from stormyocean
    In short, is it more trouble than it's worth?

    Also, I didn't see any comments about the psychiatric NP or geriatric NP career paths in this thread. I've heard predictions of huge demand for geriatric NPs in the near future. What do ya'll think?
    I'm 53 and also tossing around the NP idea. I did a masters in psych (CNS route), but never got certified, mainly just wanted the info. Did work in psych though as well as many other areas. I'm considering psych or geri, which ever has the most demand. There is a good geri department at the University of Hawaii Schol of Medicine so that might be a factor. I will probably do a post-masters online program. Would like to hear from geri/psych NPs though.

    I didn't know there was a stormy ocean in Arlington!
  10. by   jett01
    I've also been considering a return to school. Toss up between NP and CNS at this point. Where is the most demand likely to be? And in what specialty? Someone stated psych and geriatrics earlier, any other opinions or info on this? I have a BA in behavioral science and 15 years psych experience (before RN). All my RN experience has been on a med-surg/orthopedic floor.

    I'm looking at RN to MSN programs. HAS to be part-time. I'm the sole bread winner. Just built a house and I'd like see my wife and son more than occasionally over the next few years. Oh, and I make 60k/year without overtime now but want more independence and to function at a higher level of expertise. Making a lot more money isn't really a necessary part of the equation.

    One bit of feedback from a former instructor who is a psych CNS - she believes that short-sighted hospitals are likely to view a CNS as middle management who may be expendable during lean times. Her belief is that there is more job security with NP role. Thoughts?
  11. by   globalRN
    I originally planned to become an oncology CNS in 1999 but was disuaded by a colleague. At that time, many CNSs were let go by shortsighted hospital
    administrators. She suggested that there was a higher demand for NPs.

    I did the NP route and currently work as a hematology NP for a urban hospital...love my job and love the patients. However, when I look at job boards there are a lot more
    hem/onc positions for CNSs than there are for hem/onc NPs. So the pendulum swings back. The pay for NPs is fairly low considering the amount of responsibility we have. I would have to say that a lot of what I do on a day to day basis is medicine and how you are evaluated is very much gauged against medical standards of care.
  12. by   lalaxton
    Quote from zrmorgan
    no, under licensing regulations in some states (ARNP). We would not call ourselves FNP either. For example in Wa, our license is ARNP, however we have a specifier on the license that limits our practice to the anesthesia realm. It is similar with CNM's etc. I may not have paid attention to his original post...he may have been interested in specifically FNP...

    "disappoints me as I'm sure it disappoints the NPs!! I mean an NP providing primary care which includes prescribing medication, diagnosing medical illness, and paying substantial malpractice insurance"

    I know he was interested in "prescribing" , "diagnosing" and the reimbursement for those services. I also saw that he was from Wa.

    I know I would feel as comfortable in a clinic as you would in the OR. No disrespect was intended, hopefully it was not perceived.

    z
    Z- None taken. Just wanted to clarify your comment.
  13. by   Traveler
    I have been an RN for 9 years and have just gone back to earn my BSN with the goal of MSN/FNP. Some of the statistics cited show that NP's are not making that much more over a RN. I did see a previous post where they talked about working as an independent contractor for a physician- working on the busiest days, walk in clinic days, etc. If the NP has her own Medicare/Medicaid billing number how is she reimbursed because these are the doctor's patients, his overhead and staff. Would the NP get say 50% of the billable visit? Does it work sort of like that? If so, that could be pretty lucrative. I guess the key is finding a doctor that you like and trust and who likes and trusts you.

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