NP making six figures? - page 6

Hey all, The general salary figure I hear for NPs disappoints me as I'm sure it disappoints the NPs!! I mean an NP providing primary care which includes prescribing medication, diagnosing... Read More

  1. by   globalRN
    Take care of yourself first....you do sound depressed.
    I think earlier posters are correct in suggesting that you speak with your PCP about this.

    Staying in a job you hate is extremely stressful.
    Nursing is very diverse and there is a niche for almost all of us.
    NP markets are saturated but there seems to be a demand for specialty areas: cardiac, neonatal etc.

    I once thought of leaving nursing( I was in acute medical nursing)
    because I found shiftwork increasingly difficult, the heavy lifting
    exhausting and I will be honest....I do not like changing diapers and giving bedbaths. So I found a job where none of these negatives exist....and loved nursing.

    Outline what you love about nursing and what you don't.
    Find a job that would satisfy your requirements

    If you are living in an apartment(I gather you are renting)
    you may find it easier to relocate to where the jobs are.
    Once you have 2-3 years of experience under your belt, you will have more options. Yes, most places do look for people with experience and/or a track record of staying in a job for 2-3 years.

    For my first NP job, I relocated because quality work experience on your CV is very important in helping you to find that 'dream job' either today or in the near future. Think of it as an investment. I am planning on staying for 2 years minimum in my present position, possibly more if I continue to have good learning experiences. The pay does not compensate for the added responsibility and unpaid overtime(am exempt ) but I look at this as an investment in my career.
    I am a FNP but most positions wanted someone with experience.
    My first job was willing to hire me because I have ample RN
    experience in the specialty...I also love my specialty so that was a pretty easy decision to make after I decided that maybe FNP wasn't necessarily what I had to do. Regrets? No, because I
    would have eventually gravitated back to my specialty as a NP.

    It is a teaching hospital and the physicians I work with
    are busy but willing to teach. Of course, one has
    to take responsibility for self-learning since everyone everywhere
    is working at max with minimum resouces and staff.

    It can be done. I am doing it now
    Please take care of your own mental health first.
  2. by   Leslie MSN
    Along these same lines - what do PA's make? In my experience, they make more than NPs, which fries my feathers.
    Too, how about MSNs? In my opinion, NPs and MSNs should be in the same pay grade - both are advanced degreed/advanced practice nurses. They have parallel levels of education (Master's degrees), but simply have a different focus. In my area, NPs tend to receive higher pay grades than MSNs. Employer's tend to view MSNs "as just another RN!" Now we're down to frying my fat!!

    Anyone have any thoughts or research to support my opinion? Or to counter it?

    Thanks!

    Leslie:angryfire
  3. by   lalaxton
    Hi Leslie,
    I agree that MSN/CNS's should receive the same level of pay but life's not fair! I think NP's probably make more because they are able to bill directly and contribute to the organization's bottom line whereas CNS's cannot.
  4. by   EastCoast
    I think it depends on your responsibility. If an MSN is involved in the nursing department as an educator she is not carrying the level of responsibilty of one that practices as an advanced practice and is diagnosing and treating. I don't think it has to do with 'degree'. To me it comes down to what you do for a living. my 2 cents.
  5. by   NRSKarenRN
    from advance for np's:

    gliding higher - np salaries ascend at a steady pace
    by jolynn tumolo and jill rollet

    lately, news from the salary front seems to have gone from bad to worse-but not for nurse practitioners. the 2003 national salary survey of nurse practitioners shows that np salaries continued to rise over the past 2 years. the average salary in 2003 was $69,203 for full-time nurse practitioners, up 9.55% from the $63,172 average in 2001 (table1), according to our data. the average part-time wage rose less dramatically, but it did increase from $32.53 per hour in 2001 to $33.89 in 2003 (table 2).

    http://www.advancefornp.com/common/e....aspx?cc=27756


  6. by   bobcat62
    I know of 1 np who makes 120,000 a year he works for a busy cv surgeon. I know of another np who last year made 100,000 who also works for a busy cv surgeon. I have a friend who is a pa and makes around 95,000. These are all exeptions to the rule however and when you take the hours they work it doesnt come out to much more than a staff nurse with a few years of experience makes. These guys are putting in 60-70 hrs a week easy. Most np's around here are making 55,000 to 75,000 depending on who you work for and what kind of hours you are willing to work.
  7. by   VickyRN
    Quote from glascow
    I live in Louisiana, and NPs make an avg of 70,000. The higher paid ones, around 100,000, work with CV surgeons or cardiologists and work hard! They make rounds on pts in the hospital, write orders, discharge, etc. They also take lots of call. I work night shift in SICU, when I need to call the MD for a problem, I am always connected to the NP, she will give me orders. The only time I get to talk to the surgeon is if he needs to bring the pt back to OR. The NPs in these position had been ICU nurses for a long time prior to becoming an NP. The MDs they work for already new them and respected them, I think this is probably why he gives them the responsibility. Also, I used to dread calling the MD in the middle of the night, they were always so rude! Now when I have a problem with a pt, I get to call and speak to one of my friends that I worked with for yrs., I love it!
    Nurses working in MD office, not taking call or rounding in the hospitals, make about 60,000 in Louisiana.
    Hope this helps.
    This is an aside to this, but still relevant. In my neck of the woods, the cardiac doctors and cardiovascular surgeons are using ADN-RN's to do the above (NOT NP's). They make rounds for the doctors on the floor, fill in the progress note (the doctor signs it once they complete it), write orders (as "VO"), and these "nurse clinicians" (as they are called) are the ones the nurses call for orders or any changes in the patients (NOT the doctors). Scary, huh? :uhoh21:
  8. by   Nicunurse_RN
    I think i know who you are talking about
    Last edit by Nicunurse_RN on May 2, '04
  9. by   cgfnp
    Quote from VickyRN
    This is an aside to this, but still relevant. In my neck of the woods, the cardiac doctors and cardiovascular surgeons are using ADN-RN's to do the above (NOT NP's). They make rounds for the doctors on the floor, fill in the progress note (the doctor signs it once they complete it), write orders (as "VO"), and these "nurse clinicians" (as they are called) are the ones the nurses call for orders or any changes in the patients (NOT the doctors). Scary, huh? :uhoh21:
    Yikes...............
  10. by   lalaxton
    cfgnp,
    I've seen this as well, I don't think these RN's realize what the risk is if they go outside their scope of practice. I know of one RN who was working this way and finally went back to graduate school for her NP when she figured how close she could be to losing her license!
  11. by   VickyRN
    Quote from lalaxton
    cfgnp,
    I've seen this as well, I don't think these RN's realize what the risk is if they go outside their scope of practice. I know of one RN who was working this way and finally went back to graduate school for her NP when she figured how close she could be to losing her license!
    What's even more disturbing is the risk to YOUR license as an RN working on the unit when one of these "Nurse Clinicians" barks an order to you. It's written as a "VO" but you know he/ she has had no immediate contact with the physician.
  12. by   cgfnp
    Quote from VickyRN
    What's even more disturbing is the risk to YOUR license as an RN working on the unit when one of these "Nurse Clinicians" barks an order to you. It's written as a "VO" but you know he/ she has had no immediate contact with the physician.
    Exactly. I'd tell them to kiss my arse. Just asking you to risk your license by following an order a different RN took tells you how much they value you. They're willing to risk your career to save a few bucks. I'm having a hard time even grasping that that is going on...:uhoh21:
  13. by   Ari RN
    Here in NYC, RN's with no experience get a starting salary of $60,000. I am shocked that NP's start at $70,000. I thought they got paid over $100,000.

close