NP in Michigan. Info needed ASAP.

  1. Hi there, I am a Canadian RN who is attempting to complete masters/np in MI. I am finding it hard to find info similar to my situation, so if anyone has any info or can answer some of my questions- I would seriously greatly appreciate it!

    1. What is really the difference between applying to a masters and then a masters/np program. In Canada, the route/schooling to become an NP is different so a clarification between these two would be great!!

    2. How competitive/hard is it to get into a masters/np program in Michigan? I am specifically looking at Wayne State/ OU due to the specialization programs they offer.

    3. Do they accept Canadian applicants for the most part? I have heard they do, but I am wondering if there are any current Canadians doing their masters/np in MI that can provide me with advice!!

    Again, any info or experiences would help me out. Hope to hear back from anyone!!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   SopranoKris
    Quote from Hiddenoutlier
    Hi there, I am a Canadian RN who is attempting to complete masters/np in MI. I am finding it hard to find info similar to my situation, so if anyone has any info or can answer some of my questions- I would seriously greatly appreciate it!

    1. What is really the difference between applying to a masters and then a masters/np program. In Canada, the route/schooling to become an NP is different so a clarification between these two would be great!!
    I'm unsure what you mean by applying to a master's then a master's/NP program. They are one and the same. Do you mean applying to the university itself for admission graduate school? Most of the schools have you apply to both the school and the NP program at the same time.

    I'm in MI and opted to go online because I couldn't find any programs that were close enough to drive to that fit my schedule (I'm a night shift ICU nurse). They were either a 2 hour drive or close enough to drive, but classes conflicted with work.

    I can't really answer as far as acceptance of Canadian candidates, as I have no first-hand knowledge of this.

    Good luck
  4. by   Hiddenoutlier
    Hi, thank you so much for replying!!

    To clarify, what I meant was if I need to apply for a masters and apply again for a specialization, but I figured that out and I wrote it in a very confusing way.

    Also, do you mind sharing how you are finding the online program? How does the clinical portion work? I have looked into some but do not really know how to gauge if they are good, do you mind sharing which one you have selected or perhaps top three in Michigan that you know of. Also, did you have a high gpa?

    I really appreciate you answering my thread, it is hard to really make this application process as I know no one in nursing in MI.


    A million and one thank yous!!!
  5. by   juan de la cruz
    I attended a public Michigan-based on campus program. This was years ago but there were Canadian students in the program and the school actively recruits in the Windsor area with the perk that residents of some Ontario counties are offered in-state tuition. What I remember being discussed was that NP programs between the two countries were not interchangeable except for the FNP program which is equivalent to the Canadian Primary Care NP track. I attended an ACNP program and the Canadian students who were in my program were only interested in working in the US as the program has no equivalent in Ontario.
  6. by   shibaowner
    You can use the US News and World Report grad school rankings for nursing. The top 3 in MI:
    Univ of MI Ann Arbor School of Nursing
    Wayne State Univ College of Nursing
    Michigan State University College of Nursing - East Lansing

    Check each school's website for their application requirements. They should have information for international applicants, and you can also call the school admissions dept. Schools often have open houses and webinars for prospective students, as well. They probably have information on Canadian students, Canadian NP requirements, etc.

    Here in the US, you just apply for your MSN and select the track you want to be in. It's just one application. Common tracks are: FNP, Adult and Geri Primary Care, Adult and Geri Acute Care, Women's Health, Peds, Psych, etc. The school website will list the tracks available at that school and the admission requirements for each. (Acute care tracks require RN experience of 1 to 2 years)

    Good luck
  7. by   SopranoKris
    I would not put MSU's NP program in the top 3 in the state. Around here, doesn't have the best reputation. Even our local community college graduates more competent RNs than MSU's BSN program. Their BSNs struggle clinically. Their NP program is only FNP or AG-NP, no acute care option. While they do place you in clinicals, the placements are in the county jail or a community health center in a bad neighborhood. Their CRNA program is the worst in the state. MSU may be a great university for other majors, but the US News & World Report list is absolute BS. The schools on those lists puposely manipulate their reporting data to get a higher ranking. It has been de-bunked many times. I wouldn't put too much stock in it. It's a nice list, that's about it.

    Hiddenoutlier, I sent you a PM with the answers to your questions about my program.
    Last edit by SopranoKris on Sep 27
  8. by   Al Kalosis
    Quote from SopranoKris
    I'm unsure what you mean by applying to a master's then a master's/NP program. They are one and the same.
    Not necessarily.
  9. by   ThrowAway_Account
    Hello,

    I am currently in my doctoral program of nurse practitioner at Wayne State. I cannot speak for masters degree but getting admitted to my DNP program was a joke. I just graduated nursing school in May and they let me in (probably cause I went to Wayne State for my BSN). No worries about being admitted at Wayne, as long as you have money, they will take you in. Also, there is quite a few Canadian students in class with me as well. Just be aware of all the information they teach that is completely useless and a waste of money. . Second semester in and I feel like I am becoming dumber. I hope I can stand this bs for the next few semesters. If you need anything, let me know.
  10. by   KatieMI
    To begin with, Wayne is absolutely not #2 in state. With admission GPA for ACNP below 3.0, it cannot stand even UofM/Flint because of weak academic standing of matriculating students.
    On the other hand, WSU Medical center has tons of Canadian staff, including NPs. Their department would, probably, be very expereinced with Canadian paperwork, which is a BIG plus.

    Now:

    - in the US, Master's IS specialty. You do not apply just for Master's in Nursing. You apply for Family Practice, Acute Care, Primary Care, Peds, Psych, Midwifery, Leadership, etc. What you apply for determines what you will study.
    Once you got your Master's in one specialty, you can apply, study, take Boards and receive post-Master's degree on any other specialty of your choice. The limit is set only by your ability to study, pay and keep active certification for specialties.

    - All universities in Michigan will gladly accept Canadian grads who are able to get admitted and pay for stydying, but not all are equally fitted to work with them. You must have be licensed as an RN in the US to be able to apply, so you should jump through some hoops for that, but, AFAIK, it is not that complicated.

    - figure out the question about clinical preceptors right away, because I doubt that any school would approve Canadian clinicals. If not, do your best to get into a school which provides preceptors (primarily, MSU/Lansing), because with no Michigan work history and personal contacts it would be very difficult for you to find preceptors.

    - narrow specialty programs (Midwifery, Neonatal NP, CRNA) always require significant clinical experience before admission and may not recognize same specialty experience in Canada

    - Good programs are highly competitive with undergrade GPA >3.75. My class mean GPA in UofM/Flint was 3.89 and acceptance rate 13% (that is, 87% of applicants rejected). UofM Ann Arbor is even more picky.

    - Online program looks like this: you do the same readings, lectures, classes, etc. like in normal school, but do that entirely online using apps like Blackboard Classroom. Most exams are done online with you being watched through camera at all times. Depending on the program, you might have to go on campus; in my program, it was an average 2 days every semester. Clinical experience is done in place you (or program) arranged, at average 16 to 24 hours/week where you are taught 1:1 by your preceptor.
    As your professors are aware of students "just sitting home", they tend to load online courses more with readings and lectures, as they do not have any time constraints. An average reading load was around 300 pages/week, plus 200+ slides lectures.

    Do not trust ANY "ratings". Too many of them are paid by programs, and the very first Google on "nurse practitioner Michigan programs rating" will give #1 to South University, which is a known diploma mill. Counting that your situation is rather unique, you probably will do better if contacting programs one by one, starting from UofM, and see what they want you to do.

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