Now I get why experience means everything yet nothing - page 5

by bsnanat2 | 17,713 Views | 106 Comments

Now I finally get why nursing experience can prove invaluable in NP school, yet actually means nothing. It appears that nursing experience gives a valuable base from which to relate but does absolutely nothing for helping one... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from Guttercat
    I'm currently deciding between PA vs ANP route. I've been an RN for 19 years.

    It just torques me off that I spent all these years in the trenches... and for what?
    I will tell you for what.

    How many lives did you change? How many times were you there for people in their deepest darkest hour of need? Those 19 years were WELL SPENT.

    But, times, they are a changin
    alison1489 and Guttercat like this.
  2. 2
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    You mean depending on whether or not they get a job?

    The new grad NP job situation is even worse here than it is for new grad RNs. Anecdotally, even worse for direct entry folks because they don't have the reference base that nurses who "put in their time" have. Although, let's face it, the mandatory bedside time is just nursing's desperate attempt to make the NP position look more than "I couldn't get into med school or didn't want to go med school but I still want to be a doctor."
    Can you please link your reference that cites the difficulty new grad NPs are having finding work?

    Thanks
    JMEMNRN and coast2coast like this.
  3. 0
    The biggest and probably most significant difference between an NP and a PA is that an NP can bill medicare directly. A PA cannot.
  4. 1
    Obamacare and its estimated effect on NPs and PA's

    Health Care Future Bright for Nurses, Stinks for Doctors - Forbes
    Guttercat likes this.
  5. 4
    Quote from nursel56
    BCGradnurse -

    Back then it was the years of experience as a nurse that prepared one for a unique and expanded role as a practitioner. It has evolved since then but the name has stayed the same. What does the inclusion of the word mean to you if you've never worked as a nurse, though? I don't ask that out of hostility. I'm just curious.
    Yes.

    NP's are as busy overcoming the word "nurse" as PA's are busy overcoming the word "assistant."

    There's been a longtime, heated movement within the PA realm to change their title to "Physician Associate." MD's do not like it, as the term "Physician Associate" is too close to home, and thus it has been shot down.

    Nurse Practitioners have a similar battle in public consciousness...that of getting rid of the stigma of the word "nurse." In other words, "can I start your IV and fetch you some pillows while I perform a full-on, differential diagnosis? Oh and btw, you have a pheochromocytoma."
    BlueEyedGuy, mystory, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    [QUOTE=Guttercat;6263902]Yes.

    NP's are as busy overcoming the word "nurse" as PA's are busy overcoming the word "assistant."

    There's been a longtime, heated movement within the PA realm to change their title to "Physician Associate." MD's do not like it, as the term "Physician Associate" is too close to home, and thus it has been shot down.

    Nurse Practitioners have a similar battle in public consciousness...that of getting rid of the stigma of the word "nurse." In other words, "can I start your IV and fetch you some pillows while I perform a full-on, differential diagnosis? Oh and btw, you have a pheochromocytoma."[/QUOTE

    Not sure this will ever change as becoming an RN is imperative to become an NP.......
  7. 0
    As for PA's

    They are assistants in every sense of the word.

    In fact, a PA cannot practice independent of a Physician.

    In many instances NP's practice independently.......
  8. 0
    Quote from mindlor
    The biggest and probably most significant difference between an NP and a PA is that an NP can bill medicare directly. A PA cannot.
    That may change as the ACA plays out.

    That's my conundrum...deciding which route to take in light of rapidly changing definition and scope of practice..

    Nursing has the advantage in sheer numbers and lobby representation, but PA's have the (perceived) advantage in the medical model training.
  9. 1
    Quote from Guttercat
    That may change as the ACA plays out.

    That's my conundrum...deciding which route to take in light of rapidly changing definition and scope of practice..

    Nursing has the advantage in sheer numbers and lobby representation, but PA's have the (perceived) advantage in the medical model training.
    It will come down to personal preference for you. Do you prefer the nursing model or the medical model.

    To further complicate things, I am hearing rumblings that NANDA and nursing diagnoses may be going away relatively soon as studies have shown that this terminology confuses patients and causes issues with the delivery of care. The suggestion was that everyone get on the same page in regard to terminology.....we shall see.
    Rizz likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from mindlor
    I will tell you for what.

    How many lives did you change? How many times were you there for people in their deepest darkest hour of need? Those 19 years were WELL SPENT.

    But, times, they are a changin
    Thank you for that. I needed to hear it.


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