Now I get why experience means everything yet nothing - page 2

by bsnanat2

16,551 Views | 106 Comments

Now I finally get why nursing experience can prove invaluable in NP school, yet actually means nothing. It appears that nursing experience gives a valuable base from which to relate but does absolutely nothing for helping one... Read More


  1. 0
    Sorry, but I'm going to ask silly questions again!! Am I the only UK nurse on this site?? What is an NP? What is a PA, and what is the difference?
    We are always advised to use as few abbreviations as possible, especially in patients records. Well really, we don't have patients any more, we have 'Service Users'!
    I want to start a new thread regarding abuse of nurses by patients & how much we should have to take! Also guidelines as to when it would be acceptable to refuse to care for a patient as I really don't think that I could ever do it!!
    Megan xx
  2. 0
    NP=nurse practitioner=an advanced practice nurse who can prescribe medications and work in some states as an independant health care provider.PA=physician's assistant...not a nurse.
  3. 0
    NPs and PAs are both healthcare providers that can assess, diagnose, and treat health conditions (including prescribing). How much physician supervision they need varies. PAs must always be supervised. For NPs it depends on the state they're practicing in. An NP must be a RN. A PA can come from any background, although many have a lot of healthcare experience.
  4. 2
    Quote from Patti_RN
    Instead she discovered the fast-track, easy, anyone-can-do-it method--Physician Assistant school! Two years later, she's qualified (on paper, anyway) to order tests, diagnose medical conditions, and prescribe medications! And to think, just two short years ago, she was pirouetting in her tutu!
    I don't think PA school is very easy as it's full time difficult program.

    If you want to make the best of your RN experience prior to going to NP school please review my post (online degrees...) about what I did to make the most of my experience. In contrast others had years of experience and didn't learn a thing after graduating...at least to hear them talk.
    ImThatGuy and nursel56 like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from Patti_RN
    Myelin, are you doing a Psych NP? I was somewhat interested in that path, but decided I'd like the variety seeing conditions from
    allergies to warts!
    Well with PMHNP route you'll see allergies and warts as well as psych patients! What did I treat today on the psych unit...COPD, diarrhea, GERD, HIV, Hep B, Hep C, s/p shoulder dislocation, dry eyes, dry lips, chapped hands and feet. I think that was all.
    ImThatGuy likes this.
  6. 0
    I remember around 7 years ago the PA-C we were seeing told me there were programs that did not require a bachelor's degree but I think they've tightened that up quite a bit.

    I'm not aware of NP programs that require no time as a floor nurse (iow they require 1-2 years on a critical care unit). I'm really crusty on that point. If you've never been a nurse you're not a Nurse Practitioner. Call it something else. You can't always make a nice, neat bullet point list of why it matters or makes a difference between you and other mid-level providers, but it does. It's the gestalt of the thing. (that's my homage to Jean Watson )
  7. 4
    Quote from Patti_RN
    It also reinforces (for me, anyway) that NPs do have valuable experience that sets them apart from PAs. My classic example is a PA I know who majored in dance as an undergrad. She spent a few years trying to land paid dancing jobs, but realized that at her ripe old age of 28 she wasn't getting much work. So, she explored the possibilities for grad schools and employment possibilities outside standing on her toes, spinning and leaping. She decided that she'd be employable and make a great salary as an NP--but gee... that would mean she'd have to go to nursing school, pass the NCLEX, work for a few years to gain experience, apply to NP school, then spend 2 or 3 more years before she could actually be an NP. Instead she discovered the fast-track, easy, anyone-can-do-it method--Physician Assistant school! Two years later, she's qualified (on paper, anyway) to order tests, diagnose medical conditions, and prescribe medications! And to think, just two short years ago, she was pirouetting in her tutu!
    patti-With all due respect, you may want to do a little more research on what it takes to be a PA or NP. PA school is not easy, not fast-track, and not anyone can do it. I don't think it's helpful to try to defend NPs by saying derogatory things about other health care providers, especially those who are in many ways similar to NPs. It's small minded and disrespectful. I think energy is better spent supporting colleagues on a health care team, not creating rifts.
  8. 6
    Quote from nursel56
    I remember around 7 years ago the PA-C we were seeing told me there were programs that did not require a bachelor's degree but I think they've tightened that up quite a bit.

    I'm not aware of NP programs that require no time as a floor nurse (iow they require 1-2 years on a critical care unit). I'm really crusty on that point. If you've never been a nurse you're not a Nurse Practitioner. Call it something else. You can't always make a nice, neat bullet point list of why it matters or makes a difference between you and other mid-level providers, but it does. It's the gestalt of the thing. (that's my homage to Jean Watson )
    I have my RN, my MSN, and I'm certified as an FNP, and have been working as one for several years now. I have never worked as a floor nurse....so I'm not a Nurse Practitioner??? What would you like to call me???
    mystory, ImThatGuy, Gator Girl 2000, and 3 others like this.
  9. 2
    Lots of ignorance flying around.......lots of jealousy.....

    Someone please tell me whhat slinging zpack at walgreens has to do with bedside nursing?

    Let me tell you. Diddly squat.

    I had a lengthy conversation with the dean of the FNP program at Columbia University. Her opinion is that every day working at the bedside is time and money lost......

    Just sayin
    ImThatGuy and Guttercat like this.
  10. 0
    To Nurse56,

    Little schools such as Vanderbilt, Columbia University, Yale, Duke, Case Western, Johns Hopkins and many many more have direct entry or RN-MSN programs that require zero bedside nursing experience....

    Your beef should be with the NLNAC that sanctions these programs.


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