New York NP Question

  1. Cliff notes:
    I'm a new grad NP - less than 6 months experience.
    I was working in private practice psych with an NP and a psychiatrist at the office who agreed to be my collaborator.

    My boss and I had a disagreement and now I'm going to be opening my own practice.

    The psychologist who will be renting my space to me is asking all kinds of questions and seems generally uneducated on NP scope of practice laws.

    I know in new york you need 3600 hours until you can be completely independent. If I find a new collaborator, can't i practice solo? I plan to collaborate with a psychiatrist at this new office or one near my home. Please clear this up because I want to make sure I'm understanding things correctly.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   casias12
    Quote from shadowness

    The psychologist who will be renting my space to me is asking all kinds of questions and seems generally uneducated on NP scope of practice laws.
    I would start by suggesting you brush up on your grammar. When you are done with that, maybe you could try reading the laws in your particular state. I am not familiar with the regulatory requirements in New York, but I am very familiar with the laws that govern my practice in my state. That is your obligation as a licensed professional. Expecting a psychologist to know the laws that govern your practice and stating that he/she is "generally uneducated" is a pretty lame thing to say. (and, yes, I know that is not the correct use of that word, but I do use urban dictionary when I want to use a common vernacular).

    FWIW, I am glad many states anticipated new grads wanting to jump into practice with little clinical experience, hence, they have placed limits in their laws to prevent that. I am happy they did.
    Last edit by casias12 on Nov 8, '16
  4. by   shadowness
    Why the aggressive/insulting response? I'm not here to write a paper; just to ask a question. I know the laws but I want to make sure because it is not crystal clear on the NY state website. You are saying that I should know my own practice laws but shouldn't a psychologist know that a nurse practitioner can write prescriptions? All the psychiatrists I've spoken to about collaborative agreements are unaware of what it entails. I apologize for upsetting you so easily.
  5. by   casias12
    Quote from shadowness
    shouldn't a psychologist know that a nurse practitioner can write prescriptions? All the psychiatrists I've spoken to about collaborative agreements are unaware of what it entails.
    First off, a psychologist and a psychiatrist are different professions. You don't seem to be able to differrentiate the two.

    You clearly don't know the laws in your state. If your question was anything like the conversation you have had with prospective collaborating physicians, I can see why you are having trouble.
  6. by   shadowness
    I know the difference. I meant what I wrote. The psychologist and psychiatrist were both unaware of the role of an NP. Learn to read and stop jumping to conclusions. I'm not sure why you're so angry but maybe you just need to get laid? Anyhow, I had my question answered already so thanks for your time.
  7. by   Aromatic
    I would ask the state nursing board since it varies state by state. primary information is always better than secondary information from ''da forumz''
  8. by   casias12
    Quote from shadowness
    I know the difference. I meant what I wrote. The psychologist and psychiatrist were both unaware of the role of an NP. Learn to read and stop jumping to conclusions. I'm not sure why you're so angry but maybe you just need to get laid? Anyhow, I had my question answered already so thanks for your time.
    I just wanted to point out how unprofessional you are, and these comments prove it. Please don't go on a race-to-the bottom with our profession.

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