NEED HELP!

  1. 0
    Hello,

    I am new to this site, and I came looking to get some advise. I am wondering which program would be better suited for me. I am a junior in college right now, and I am graduating in the spring. I have a mediocre GPA of 3.5. I was pre-med so that effed me up. I am looking to become an NP, but most grad entry programs begin in the summer, but I have found a few ABSN programs that start in the spring. I am trying to get my schooling done in the quickest route. I am in the midwest and I would like to stay there, but UIC's app is closed and Depaul requires a year of work before returning from the Generalist. Loyola requires all prereqs to have a "B" and I got a B- in orgo... I was wondering if anyone could give me any advise or even if I am competitive.

    I have 1.5 years working as a Pharmacy tech
    2 semesters of working at free clinic
    1 semester educational policies committee
    2 semesters tutoring refugee children
    3 semesters health professions club member
    3 month summer medical records internship
    3 months medical mission to Ghana
    Jewel Osco Scholarship winner

    I have not taken the GRE so that is coming up. I know I don't look very competitive, but I will be applying to Johns Hopkins, Penn, Boston College, Columbia, Vanderbilt, Duke (ABSN) and Marquette. Does it help being a male when applying to these programs? Any schools I should add to the list or even take off the list?

    My recommendations will be coming from a theology professor, Abnormal and Developmental Professor, and My mentor who is the pharmacy manager where I work.
  2. 3 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I doubt whether your gender will make a difference at all. That boat has already sailed. Have you spoken with admissions advisors at the schools you are interested in? They can provide you with a breakdown of entering students from past semesters in terms of selection ratio, avg GPA, avg GRE, etc. A much more accurate source than feedback from random strangers on this forum. It's also not a good idea to bring up the subject of "male advantage" at all because it connotes a sense of unwarranted entitlement. This is universally offensive to both experienced nurses (authority figures in academia and clinical service) as well as new grads who have struggled through the entire educational process. You don't want to go there.

    If you are considering ELM (entry-level masters) programs, I strongly advise you to make a very thorough investigation of job outlook for those graduates before committing to the program. These folks are not getting jobs in my part of the country - no one wants to hire an "advanced" practitioner without any clinical experience, particularly when there are many other more qualified candidates. You will also run into problems with the portability of your license between states due to the fact that many BONs specifically define basic educational requirements strictly in terms of undergraduate degrees.
  4. 0
    I did not ask about being male to be offensive to anyone. I was merely asking because it would seem that those in the minority usually have an easier time with acceptance. Although, the trend may be changing males are no doubt the minority. I would assume that schools would first have to admit more males to encourage the changing of these norms. Also I would not understand the logic of not hiring an NP from a generalist masters seeing that PAs are in the same boat with one less year of course work.
  5. 0
    My comments are in bold along with your original post.
    Quote from Jrah
    Hello,

    I am new to this site, and I came looking to get some advise. I am wondering which program would be better suited for me. I am a junior in college right now, and I am graduating in the spring. I have a mediocre GPA of 3.5. I was pre-med so that effed me up. I am looking to become an NP, but most grad entry programs begin in the summer, but I have found a few ABSN programs that start in the spring. I am trying to get my schooling done in the quickest route. I am in the midwest and I would like to stay there, but UIC's app is closed and Depaul requires a year of work before returning from the Generalist. Loyola requires all prereqs to have a "B" and I got a B- in orgo... I don't think a B- in OChem is going to hurt you since it is NOT a prereq for most NP programs.
    I was wondering if anyone could give me any advise or even if I am competitive.

    I have 1.5 years working as a Pharmacy tech
    2 semesters of working at free clinic
    1 semester educational policies committee
    2 semesters tutoring refugee children
    3 semesters health professions club member
    3 month summer medical records internship
    3 months medical mission to Ghana
    Jewel Osco Scholarship winner

    I have not taken the GRE so that is coming up. I know I don't look very competitive, but I will be applying to Johns Hopkins, Penn, Boston College, Columbia, Vanderbilt, Duke (ABSN) and Marquette. Does it help being a male when applying to these programs? Any schools I should add to the list or even take off the list?
    As long as your GRE is competitive, I don't see you having any problems being offered admission to a program. I am not familiar with programs in the Midwest, but certainly Vanderbilt could meet your desire to complete a program fairly quickly.

    Whether it's good or bad, I don't know, but I did hear a lot about NP programs actively recruiting males and minority students when I was in school (2009-2011) so I doubt that ship has passed entirely. Schools like their programs to appear diverse and that just can't happen when all the pics on the website include only young, white, female students. *Not here to offend, but giving my view of things* Whether that means requirements for entry are relaxed for males and/or minorities, I don't know.

    My recommendations will be coming from a theology professor, Abnormal and Developmental Professor, and My mentor who is the pharmacy manager where I work. I would think these are good references for you. You should be able to put together a very good application essay with your experiences in the free clinic, medical mission to Ghana, and work as a pharmacy tech. You've worked with people who were in economically difficult situations who required care/medications and you can definitely speak to the needs of those communities and why this type of experience sparked a desire in you to provide excellent care to just these types of patients in the future.


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