Marketability of a new NP?

  1. Hi all,
    Merry Christmas! While I have a minute off of work I decided to write in with a new question. I will be starting in an FNP program this coming fall. My issue is that there are two potential colleges I could attend; Drexel or Univ of Pennsylvania, as I will continue to work and take classes. By the time I start I will have one year experience as an RN at Children's hosp of Phila. in the ED. Drexel is about a quarter of the price, considering I get a price break if I go to Drexel b/c of the hospital I work for. However, Univ of Penn. is an Ivy League school. I have never been one to buy into the philosophy of paying a ton of money for a name, but would I be more desirable as an FNP if I graduate from Penn vs. Drexel, assuming all other factors such as grades and what-not remain equal between the two schools? Anyone have any experience of not being employed or not being as well paid d/t the school you graduated from? Thanks for any input you are willing to share~ Suzanne
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Interesting question - hopefully someone with more knowledge about this than me will come along soon and help you out. Take care. Merry XMas.
  4. by   sirI
    IMHO? Employers do not look at the institution from which you graduated. At least, not in my case nor the NPs with whom I mentor. All things said, they are most concerned with your previous RN experience.
  5. by   suzanne4
    I am with Siri on this one; employers are concerned with your experience, the name that the degree came from really does not matter.
  6. by   juan de la cruz
    Not that I am seconding everyone else and have no opinion of my own but I do agree with Siri and Suzanne on this one as well. Employers will look at the whole picture -- the fact that you have FNP training and certification, your RN background, and the prospective employer's perception of how you will fit into their existing practice. I couldn't imagine someone from an Ivy League school getting paid more just because of the fact that they attended such an institution.
  7. by   smile123
    Quote from PhillyKidRN
    Hi all,
    Merry Christmas! While I have a minute off of work I decided to write in with a new question. I will be starting in an FNP program this coming fall. My issue is that there are two potential colleges I could attend; Drexel or Univ of Pennsylvania, as I will continue to work and take classes. By the time I start I will have one year experience as an RN at Children's hosp of Phila. in the ED. Drexel is about a quarter of the price, considering I get a price break if I go to Drexel b/c of the hospital I work for. However, Univ of Penn. is an Ivy League school. I have never been one to buy into the philosophy of paying a ton of money for a name, but would I be more desirable as an FNP if I graduate from Penn vs. Drexel, assuming all other factors such as grades and what-not remain equal between the two schools? Anyone have any experience of not being employed or not being as well paid d/t the school you graduated from? Thanks for any input you are willing to share~ Suzanne
    From what I've heard, "Ivy vs. non-Ivy" school does not matter. It's the FNP degree, your nursing experience and recommendations from your clinicals that help. But I've never heard of a "bonus" or higher wages for an Ivy league NP grad. Save your money and go to Drexel.
  8. by   Jolie
    Having lived and worked in a number of major cities in the midwest, south, and northeast, I would like to offer a slightly different perspective on this. I believe that if you plan to stay and work in a major city in the Northeast, the Penn name may be of benefit to you, especially in obtaining your first job as an NP.

    "Elite" name recognition seems to carry a bit too much weight (in my opinion) in that area of the country. If you plan to take your degree and go anywhere else, it won't matter a whit.

    Good luck to you.
  9. by   lovingpecola
    I agree with Joile on this one. In the Northeast, I believe it matters, and I say that because I notice a difference between how institutions (while on clinical assisgnments) treat me and my fellow students vs. how they treat students from other institutions.

    It may be because other students are in associate/BSN programs and we are in grad-entry, but I can't help but think that it is also the school/institution type reputation...good or bad.

    I also agree that it depends on where you're going...for example, if you want to work at Penn (or wherever) I think you'd have a leg up by actually going there...if nothing else, you'll know people. (I think this goes for any school, ivy or non)

    I am also interested in seeing what those who are actually interviewing/working have to share....
  10. by   SteveNNP
    hi,

    I'm having the same dilemma as the OP.... I'm starting my NNP this fall, and had to choose between an online-based (read: dirt cheap) program, or Columbia University in NYC. (Also Ivy League) I chose Columbia, because while mulling the options over in my head, such as increased $$ of classes and living, I will be exposed to the latest/greatest in neonatology at Columbia. I also want to work in NYC after I graduate, so getting my foot in the door of their hospitals while spending 700 hours in clinicals there will be beneficial. I would suggest you examine your goals... Do you want to work in a particular area? Is money the real issue? I hate to admit it, but the name of the school does hold additional weight, especially in the NE, where I grew up, and am returning this summer.... Good Luck!
  11. by   jls485
    I used to work as an engineer in a major health care company before I'm an accl. BSN student. Again, this is just my opinion. The companies I worked for; majority of the directors, CEO and CFO have ivy degrees. In particular, the CEO and CFO have the degree from Penn. Wharton. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there is many high up mangement have non-ivy degrees; or even don't have a degree. But at least in my experiencs, and even my friend who works for a major corporation share the same thoughts, that the ivy degree will come in handy. I used to think degree is just a degree, but as time progress, I think the ivy degree will help you in "some ways some how". Again, this is just my experiece from worked in the corporate world...
  12. by   Spacklehead
    Quote from jls485
    I used to work as an engineer in a major health care company before I'm an accl. BSN student. Again, this is just my opinion. The companies I worked for; majority of the directors, CEO and CFO have ivy degrees. In particular, the CEO and CFO have the degree from Penn. Wharton. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there is many high up mangement have non-ivy degrees; or even don't have a degree. But at least in my experiencs, and even my friend who works for a major corporation share the same thoughts, that the ivy degree will come in handy. I used to think degree is just a degree, but as time progress, I think the ivy degree will help you in "some ways some how". Again, this is just my experiece from worked in the corporate world...
    Regarding the business world, I completely agree that having a MBA from an Ivy will make a huge difference in where one might get hired; however, when it comes to APN, I think there is much less emphasis placed on from where one obtained a degree. They are two entirely different professional fields that value different things and provide different levels of opportunities.

    IMHO, I can't see a NP candidate who went to a NP program at an Ivy school right after graduation from their BSN program getting chosen over someone who has 10 years RN experience in their chosen APN field - that would make me lose a lot of respect for that employer and would make me wonder about their integrity to providing great patient care. Of course, this is just my two cents.

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