Jobless FNP - page 2

I graduated 1 year ago and still have not found a meaningful NP position. Just about every position that I have applied for, I have either gotten no response or a generic email stating that I am not... Read More

  1. by   angeloublue22
    Have you tried corrections? It's actually a better job than you think and you see a diverse population with pretty much every health issue you can imagine. It is not as bad as it sounds. You patients are nice because if they aren't, they get in trouble. It also usually pays well and you get benefits. If you can get one where medical is run by the government, instead contracted out, even better.
  2. by   Nicola301975
    When you say Western US, what states are you referring to? I am willing to relocate, but can no longer wait on the Credentialing process, which can take upwards of 3months or longer. I need to work now. A few years ago all the nurses I worked with that became NP's had job offers within 2months. Fast forward to now, most of my co workers that I graduated with within the last year still has not found a full time position, if any at all. Another issue is the low salary that I have seen posted.
  3. by   djmatte
    Quote from Nicola301975
    When you say Western US, what states are you referring to? I am willing to relocate, but can no longer wait on the Credentialing process, which can take upwards of 3months or longer. I need to work now. A few years ago all the nurses I worked with that became NP's had job offers within 2months. Fast forward to now, most of my co workers that I graduated with within the last year still has not found a full time position, if any at all. Another issue is the low salary that I have seen posted.
    You will always have to wait on credentialing sadly. There are numerous positions in Redding California area. I'm actively talking to recruiters there. Go to practicelink.com and set up a profile and start sending our resumes. I've gotten reach outs from Delaware to Redding. Make sure your resume is on point.
  4. by   Oldmahubbard
    Quote from angeloublue22
    Have you tried corrections? It's actually a better job than you think and you see a diverse population with pretty much every health issue you can imagine. It is not as bad as it sounds. You patients are nice because if they aren't, they get in trouble. It also usually pays well and you get benefits. If you can get one where medical is run by the government, instead contracted out, even better.
    Corrections is not what you might think. Most of the patients are more polite than folks on the street, and you learn a ton, plus meet other providers, many of whom have a second job in the real world.
  5. by   FullGlass
    Quote from Nicola301975
    When you say Western US, what states are you referring to? I am willing to relocate, but can no longer wait on the Credentialing process, which can take upwards of 3months or longer. I need to work now. A few years ago all the nurses I worked with that became NP's had job offers within 2months. Fast forward to now, most of my co workers that I graduated with within the last year still has not found a full time position, if any at all. Another issue is the low salary that I have seen posted.
    I looked in CA, NV, AZ, MT, OR, HI, Alaska, etc., and had good results. Credentialing is an issue no matter where you get a job. California licensure can take a long time, but the other states are pretty fast on NP licensure. If you only look in Las Vegas, you are limiting your options. I provided a link in a previous response to this thread to an article I wrote which had detailed information on new grad job search.
  6. by   KatieMI
    1). Limiting yourself to one narrow specialty in the beginning of the career is not a good idea. Especially if everything you are apparently gonna do is to sign scripts.
    2). NEVER believe what the practice owner says about patient load. Realistically, multiply whatever number you have been promiced for 1.25 - 1.3 for real everyday work.
    3). Get in your car, park on the other side of the street and look how many people really walk through that door and how quickly they leave. Do it at least three separate days. If even one patient of each 4 leaves in less than 10 to 15 min, then the "clinic" in question is a script mill with no questions about it.
    4). NEVER believe anything else till you have your contract signed. Especially working hours.
    5). Private practices not always give many benefits and they are generally worse than those which larger employers offer. But, they usually pay a bit more, and MUCH more importantly, they are more flexible. You won't have to find your own coverage if you need a couple of days off.
    6). You can be FORCED to accept what can be considered as kickbacks (for example, attending an "educational dinner").
    7). You'll have to get the best malpractice coverage available for this type of job. And it will cost A LOT.

    I do not know about jobs in Vegas, it can be oversaturated with new grads. But I would consider such type of job if there would be the choice between doing this and seeing my kids sleeping on streets and begging for food. Really, if you can, relocate. University of Pittsburgh, PA was putting flyers in hotel rooms and buses for NP jobs last fall.

    And, yeah, credentialing is a pain in (you know where), in every state.
  7. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from Nicola301975
    A few years ago all the nurses I worked with that became NP's had job offers within 2months. Fast forward to now, most of my co workers that I graduated with within the last year still has not found a full time position, if any at all. Another issue is the low salary that I have seen posted.
    Where did they go to school and where did you go to school? Same program?
  8. by   jaznia15
    I've definitely been where you have been and I can definitely feel your frustrations. I think the advice being offered so far about being weary of a clinic which would require you to see 40+ patients per day is valid. I did not see if you were currently working as an RN but since Las Vegas is a new area for you I would suggest you do and network while you are working. My experience has been its not what you know but who you know. I went on several interviews and kept getting rejected due to being a new graduate. I was still working as a RN and was on the cusp of taking a break from searching for NP positions when one of my co-workers stepped in. We were both PRN employees and I simply had a conversation with him about my desolate situation. He turned out to be a director of nursing at a local prison and knew of a position that desperately needed filling by a FNP. I never in a million years thought I would in up in corrections but I love my job. It has great benefits and a great salary for the southeast region. In my experience these past three years in corrections, there is always needs for NPs in this area. Even if that is not somewhere you want to go, I encourage you to network. There are many conferences in Las Vegas every year for CMEs. If I was in the position to relocate, then I would definitely use any opportunity to network. If you do currently work as a RN ask the doctors about any colleagues who may be looking for a NP. I still moonlight as a RN on the weekends while I'm finishing up a post-master's Psych NP program. Just the other day, a doctor asked me if I knew any NPs as he was looking to hire some for his urgent care center. I'm sure you have put in a lot of work and I understand how mentally exhausting this process can be, but do not give up. I have recruiters still emailing me everyday about positions in other states and I stopped searching for positions years ago. A lot of these positions accept new grads as well! Good luck to you!
  9. by   Workitinurfava
    How much experience do you have as an NP?, if none, you can only be so picky otherwise you will stay where you are, which is jobless.
  10. by   RNGrad2006
    Have you checked out Care More in Vegas? I worked for Care More in Phoenix and sadly they left the market but I got excellent training and I learned a lot. It is disease management so you do annual wellness visits as well as wound care, coumadin management and management of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, COPD, CKD. I would check it out. I looked and they have an opening for an NP and they often hire new grads. They will also give you excellent benefits.
  11. by   ms_sgr
    I live in Dallas, TX and my degree is AGPC. I will be relocating to a rural area in Washington State. I just saw a job posting on indeed in Bellevue stating that they hire new grads and has a $20,000 sign on bonus. I'm not sure if you are interested in relocating. Also, rural areas are more likely to hire new grads and provide assistance with loan repayment.
  12. by   CrunchRN
    Bellevue is not rural, but suburban and average home cost is about 700k. Just thought you should know.
  13. by   ms_sgr
    You misread my post. I stated that I'm relocating to a rural area (that is 1.5 hours outside of Seattle) and that I saw a job on indeed for a position in Bellevue. I'm aware that Bellevue is not in a rural area, and you don't have to live where you work. I was just giving options for locating a job.

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