Job tips for searching in San Diego?

  1. Hi all,
    My wife is about to graduate as an NP here in Atlanta. We're looking to move back to Southern California. She's applying to jobs in San Diego but hasn't found a ton of postings. Is the job market fairly crowded there? Are there any particular job listing sites you may recommend that we may not know of? Thanks in advance for your time, all.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   shibaowner
    There are NP jobs in San Diego County, but this is a highly desireable location and competition is strong. I live in North San Diego County. I think if you are going to move, move first and then look for a job. Organizations don't like to pay relo if they don't have to. In addition, look at the inland areas, as there is less competition for jobs there - Temecula, eastern SD County, etc. Take Medical Spanish.

    Personally, I like LinkedIn. A lot of recruiters use it.

    While I own a home in North County, I took a job way up north in Redding, as I had a public service commitment for 2 years. However, if it weren't for the public service commitment, I would have had no trouble getting a job here.
  4. by   ICUman
    Quote from shibaowner
    I think if you are going to move, move first and then look for a job. Organizations don't like to pay relo if they don't have to.
    This is not good advice. It's always better to start your job search before making the move. Asking if relocation assistance is available is harmless.
  5. by   juan de la cruz
    I'm not in San Diego area but in my part of California, it's never a good idea to move without a job offer. One, finding a place to live will be virtually impossible. Landlords ask for proof of employment or an official job offer indicating salary. Two, even if you can find a place to live in or have friends or family you can stay with, your financial reserves can dwindle quick as the cost of living is so high to afford not having a steady flow of income.
  6. by   shibaowner
    Many employers will not pay relo unless the candidate has outstanding skills/qualifications. San Diego is big enough and such a desireable place to live that we do not have a shortage of such people, or people from nearby areas such as LA and OC that can easily and cheaply relo. It also depends on the job. A large hospital might pay relo. However, most private practices will not. As I indicated, there are jobs here, and RNs and NPs do get jobs here, but the odds are against someone who does not live here already, unless they've won the Nobel Prize or something. And again, an exception might be underserved areas of San Diego County, which might be willing to pay relo in order to get someone, but we don't have a lot of underserved areas.
  7. by   maxcriden
    Quote from shibaowner
    Many employers will not pay relo unless the candidate has outstanding skills/qualifications. San Diego is big enough and such a desireable place to live that we do not have a shortage of such people, or people from nearby areas such as LA and OC that can easily and cheaply relo. It also depends on the job. A large hospital might pay relo. However, most private practices will not. As I indicated, there are jobs here, and RNs and NPs do get jobs here, but the odds are against someone who does not live here already, unless they've won the Nobel Prize or something. And again, an exception might be underserved areas of San Diego County, which might be willing to pay relo in order to get someone, but we don't have a lot of underserved areas.
    Thanks very much for your posts and advice in this thread (and thanks to Juan and ICUman also!).

    So, the situation is that we are probably not going to move until she has a job. But, at the same time, we have no expectation whatsoever of our relo being paid for even one penny's worth by the employer. Given that, is there really an expectation on the part of the hiring employer that if someone's resume says they're out of state that they wouldn't be more than willing to relocate under their own steam? We've both gotten jobs in other fields in other states before moving to those states in the past. It's disheartening to hear that employers may look at it that way, but I'm hoping they won't. Is that unrealistic? We've budgeted and planned to move under our own steam and my job should be able to transfer once she gets a job there. I'm not doubting your advice, just hoping that there are some hiring employers who wouldn't assume we'd expect relo assistance.

    Additionally, do you have any tips on how to market yourself as a new grad in the SD market?
  8. by   shibaowner
    Personally, I advise you transfer out here first. That way you will have one income. Since your wife just graduated, she isn't working now anyway, I assume.

    1. Check for new grad residency programs or training programs for NPs. You'll have to check with every hospital in SD County and with Kaiser.

    2. Have a good profile on LinkedIn. You can also set up a job alert on LinkedIn and get daily notices of new job listings.

    3. Make sure the cover letter and resume clearly states will relocate at own expense, if necessary. You can tailor this - add this statement if the job listing says no relo. For a large employer, they may pay some relo for a new grad.

    4. Use the usual job sites like Indeed and ZipRecruiter, etc. Also consider federal employment with the VA, Marine Corps, or Navy. The military does hire civilian NPs to work at the base hospitals. Also the federal and state prisons. County of San Diego is always looking for NPs, but they pay crappy. Although, it might be ok for a year or two just to get some experience.

    5. San Diego is a popular retirement area, so consider SNFs and LTCs.

    6. Again, be willing to look in the remote areas like East San Diego County. There are some Indian tribes that also occasionally have openings for NPs.

    7. In California, all the postings say FNP. If your wife is AGNP, apply anyway - employers are often ok with this.

    8. If you wife has not already started the California NP license process, start it ASAP! It takes 3 months to get the NP license after submitting the application. Having the California NP license makes a huge difference in a remote job search. I can't stress this enough. The licensure process in Cali is horrendously long.

    9. Network, network, network. Ask friends and family in SoCal. Check with school alumni association. Use LinkedIn to network.

    10. Consider South Orange County for jobs. I live in Carlsbad and have had jobs there - it is less than 1 hour commute to Newport Beach and Irvine. So look for jobs in Orange County that are Irvine and south (within 1 hour drive of North San Diego County). I have also seen some jobs that look decent in Temecula.

    11. Housing is a consideration. Rents here are expensive - $2000 for a decent one BR apartment in a coastal city - cheaper if you go inland. In addition, we have an acute housing shortage, so it can be very hard to find a decent, affordable place to rent if you want to live near the coast. Good places tend to get snapped up in days.

    12. Also look at the community colleges and universities for NP jobs. Even some high schools now hire NPs.

    Good luck.

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