Issues with residents - page 2

I am a third year AGACNP student in a clinical rotation in a surgical ICU team. The team is small and consists of the lead APRN, the attending, myself and perhaps one other NP student and lately a... Read More

  1. by   TriciaJ
    She spent all day parking herself directly in front of you? After about the third time I'd have a hard time resisting pulling individual hairs out of her head. When she notices, just say "Sorry. I think you might have nits." That should be the last time you see the back of her head in such close proximity.
  2. by   hppygr8ful
    Well

    I was faced with a similar situation several years ago while on a clinical rotation - A Sr RN who was not my preceptor decided to pontificate on how Psych Nurses are not "Real Nurses" actually putting on a little show of someone running away from a patient with chest pain. Everyone there knew I was a psych nurse. I took it all in good humor until I was asked to start an IV which I proceeded to do and this nurse steps in and says "Here honey I got that." I declined started the IV with no difficulty then found this nurse in the nurses station. I said in front of everyone there including a physician "Look honey, I have been a nurse from as long as you have and done many specialties. I will put my skills up against yours any day so treat me with respect and I will do the same." As karma would have our next admit was a 56 y/o man with chest pain who a congruent diagnosis of Bi-polar with psychotic features. Not a single nurse on the unit wanted to go near him. I Doctor I had known for years suggested that I go attend the patient and do the initial nursing assessment. Once I had the patient sorted out and comfort able everyone there had a new Idea about psych nurses.

    Hppy
  3. by   audreysmagic
    I've been blessed that most of my experiences with residents have been great - my main issues are adolescent psych patients trying to scam them by getting orders from them for things that are not allowed on the unit (so they can then howl, "But I have a doctor's order!")... But once I talk to them they're cool. My Extra Special folks have usually been techs or fellow nurses. You seem to find a few more of those in psych, too. But...wow. I'd probably have to pick my battles on this one if I was almost out of the rotation, but I'd still stew over it. My favorite Extra Special Nurse was an older lady, who didn't even earn proper COB status (as the COBs are usually efficient, whereas this lady was anything but), who was always preaching to me, "I've been a nurse 34 years and if someone shows me a better way, by God, I'll do it..." Thing was, we did try to show her better ways, several times, and she firmly rejected them for Her Way. Quickly figured out that speech was, basically, an attempt for us to start doing things Her Way. Which was...not happening. Fortunately, she's no longer at my hospital. She needed a nice, quiet job in a tiny office somewhere that fit her pace.

    While doing research for a paper this week, though, I did happen upon what seems to be the med student/resident version of AN, and...wow, there was a thread where it was just EVERYONE kvetching about NP's and making fun of them and even referencing AN as "wow go over there and look at how special they think they are." It was like finding a high school burn book, and most of them just seemed bitter about the money and time they were spending. (But when I clicked to see more of their posts, because I am nothing if not petty, I found that most of them are like third year students who still don't even know their basics firmly...) Maybe your resident is a denizen there. ;-D
  4. by   audreysmagic
    Quote from hppygr8ful
    Well

    I was faced with a similar situation several years ago while on a clinical rotation - A Sr RN who was not my preceptor decided to pontificate on how Psych Nurses are not "Real Nurses" actually putting on a little show of someone running away from a patient with chest pain. Everyone there knew I was a psych nurse. I took it all in good humor until I was asked to start an IV which I proceeded to do and this nurse steps in and says "Here honey I got that." I declined started the IV with no difficulty then found this nurse in the nurses station. I said in front of everyone there including a physician "Look honey, I have been a nurse from as long as you have and done many specialties. I will put my skills up against yours any day so treat me with respect and I will do the same." As karma would have our next admit was a 56 y/o man with chest pain who a congruent diagnosis of Bi-polar with psychotic features. Not a single nurse on the unit wanted to go near him. I Doctor I had known for years suggested that I go attend the patient and do the initial nursing assessment. Once I had the patient sorted out and comfort able everyone there had a new Idea about psych nurses.

    Hppy
    Oh, nothing burns me like the assumption that psych nurses couldn't hack it in medical... Granted, there are a few, but usually, they're not great psych nurses either. Carve on my grave, "Psych patients can and do have medical problems!" There's a vast difference between a nurse in a freestanding psych facility not having the resources or equipment to deal with a medical emergency and not having the knowledge...a battle I often have with EMS when I have to call them and they give me That Look like "this isn't an emergency." Well, it is here, when I can't properly manage it before it becomes one. Usually a good solid report and a reminder of our lack of higher-level medical capabilities wipes that look away, and I've been known to casually mention I used to be an EMT to some of them... #pettyforlife But usually I have to just sigh and let it go.
  5. by   3ringnursing
    UNCOOL!

    The princess sounds fabulous - I bet all the RN's that have to work with HRH are all having to reinvent the wheel on a daily basis.

    One good bite to that index finger should do the trick I would think.
    Last edit by 3ringnursing on Apr 25
  6. by   Needneedle
    I know that we should all be nice to each other always, but the reality is that sometimes there is not time to be nice, and there is a rank structure. Yes, in an operation, the resident is more important than you. Get used to it. As a prior attorney, I was always nice to paralegals. But if we were in the middle of a trial and my pen stops working, I am taking my paralegal's pen. I am the attorney with the law license, and the paralegal is not. I am the one who will be asking questions of witnesses, not the paralegal. While I would be civil about it, I would not stop or delay whatever needed to be done in order to explain things to the paralegal in the middle of a trial. I suggest that you go to the resident after an operation, and try to find out or learn whatever you missed during the procedure, and all you can say is that you didn't hear the resident at times. If the resident is decent, he will speak louder the next time, if he is a jerk he won't, but you can not stop people from being jerks. You can also ask the resident why the resident moved you around, but ask it in the sense of wanting to improve yourself for next time, not as Hey, you touched me! From what it sounds, the resident was nervous and compensated for his nervousness by throwing his weight around.
  7. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from Needneedle
    I know that we should all be nice to each other always, but the reality is that sometimes there is not time to be nice, and there is a rank structure. Yes, in an operation, the resident is more important than you. Get used to it. As a prior attorney, I was always nice to paralegals. But if we were in the middle of a trial and my pen stops working, I am taking my paralegal's pen. I am the attorney with the law license, and the paralegal is not. I am the one who will be asking questions of witnesses, not the paralegal. While I would be civil about it, I would not stop or delay whatever needed to be done in order to explain things to the paralegal in the middle of a trial. I suggest that you go to the resident after an operation, and try to find out or learn whatever you missed during the procedure, and all you can say is that you didn't hear the resident at times. If the resident is decent, he will speak louder the next time, if he is a jerk he won't, but you can not stop people from being jerks. You can also ask the resident why the resident moved you around, but ask it in the sense of wanting to improve yourself for next time, not as Hey, you touched me! From what it sounds, the resident was nervous and compensated for his nervousness by throwing his weight around.
    Are you kidding me? Firstly, the resident has absolutely no jurisdiction over me. Secondly, this is my major rotation and she is just traveling through...she's in OBGYN, I'm a critical care major and a veteran of the ICU for many, many years, and I've been on this rotation for three months. It was her first day! Thirdly, I didn't do anything wrong nor miss anything as I've been in this business longer than she's been alive, so there's nothing that she needs to tell me nor does she need to pull rank on me. I am part of the team and I have my own patients and write my own notes that she has absolutely no input in. I don't bow to her. I'd save that respect for the attending and the lead APRN. What a ridiculous statement.

    And an update to the other that I mentioned...the one who kicked me off of my computer, who I thought was a resident but actually turned out to be a new NP grad who had just been hired and is on orientation. She didn't show up for work 4 times and is now in a lot of hot water, the ripples of which went all the way up to the critical care medical director. I guess my instincts were right about her, but I'm not wading into those waters. I guess I'm just amazed at the attitude of some people.
  8. by   hogger
    people aren't always nice to me and when they are mean I make sure to post on internet forums so people give me E-sympathy.



    Sort of took the OP serious until he/she starting throwing around all this nursing experience and precious millennial stuff. People can be rude, welcome to Earth. Something tells me this is not the whole story lmao.
  9. by   WKShadowRN
    The OP is definitely not a millenial.
  10. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from hogger
    people aren't always nice to me and when they are mean I make sure to post on internet forums so people give me E-sympathy.



    Sort of took the OP serious until he/she starting throwing around all this nursing experience and precious millennial stuff. People can be rude, welcome to Earth. Something tells me this is not the whole story lmao.
    Yes, people can be rude...just as you are demonstrating.
  11. by   TicTok411
    As a student I would try to take the high road and not let these residents see they are bothering me. I would not give them the satisfaction. I worked in the ICUs a long time as an RN and residents come and go. There are always a few who think their poo don't stink and a few that just want to try and put you in you place. Over the years you learn how to deal with these types. Fortunately, the attending knew us better than the residents and if it was a particular problem we would pass it up the chain and it would be handled. I have seen many a resident required to apologize to an RN he/she was rude to and that is delightful to witness.

    I work as an NP in a non-teaching facility and so very thankful I do not have to deal with residents. Many were great and it was always somehow satisfying to see them grow over their residency. I always tried to help them out anyway I could unless they wanted to have a chip on their shoulder then I would let them flounder. The ones we liked we took care of and they appreciated it and worked well with us. The nasty ones, well the unit secretary would call every 10 minutes at 0200 to clarify every order one by one.

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