Interesting Physician Perspective On NPs - page 5

by PMFB-RN 19,866 Views | 96 Comments

I am not an NP. I am a full time rapid response nurse at a teaching hospital. This morning I stopped in to residents office to update the night residents on what had happened with their patients and what I had done. They were in... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from treejay
    very inaccurate. vast majority of PA programs are masters with many prereqs.
    *** What is the evidence for this large change?
  2. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** What is the evidence for this large change?
    Physician Assistant Programs
    170 programs. Eight cert or associates. Another 15 or so Bachelors. The rest are Masters. Most of the Bachelors and Associates programs offer a distance learning masters degree in addition to the program degree.
  3. 6
    I really don't think this bickering between PAs and NPs helps either of our fields. Most agree that a few years into practice, the differences between NPs and PAs is minute. I wish the fields were more supportive of eachother.
    on eagles wings, silenced, chibix, and 3 others like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from core0
    Physician Assistant Programs
    170 programs. Eight cert or associates. Another 15 or so Bachelors. The rest are Masters. Most of the Bachelors and Associates programs offer a distance learning masters degree in addition to the program degree.
    *** I believe you but don't see that information in the link you provied. I had already found that site as well but without goig to each school's website I didn't see how you could determine what kind of program they were. They used to list them by state with degree listed after. I notice they don't do that anymore.
    What has been the motivation for more and more programs going to the masters degree? Were PAs prepared at other levels shows to inadiquatly prepared?
  5. 6
    Sorry, all advance practice nurses are created equally. None of them is superior to any other, and I don't know anyone who thinks otherwise except students who don't know any better. We think of ourselves, along with our PA brethren, as well as MDs and DOs, as colleagues. We have different specialties and backgrounds, but we are all peers. This constant need to "rank" people is jejune, and only diffident people feel the need to play that game. Everyone brings something unique to the table. When you are working within a group, you quickly learn how to work together toward everyone's strengths and all that ego nonsense falls away.


    Grown ups do not discuss their salaries, how gauche.


    I've got news, the coding police, practice managers and risk mangers ultimately out "rank" us all.
    MinnRN926, ryguyRN, silenced, and 3 others like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Sorry, all advance practice nurses are created equally. None of them is superior to any other, and I don't know anyone who thinks otherwise except students who don't know any better. We think of ourselves, along with our PA brethren, as well as MDs and DOs, as colleagues. We have different specialties and backgrounds, but we are all peers. This constant need to "rank" people is jejune, and only diffident people feel the need to play that game. Everyone brings something unique to the table. When you are working within a group, you quickly learn how to work together toward everyone's strengths and all that ego nonsense falls away.


    Grown ups do not discuss their salaries, how gauche.


    I've got news, the coding police, practice managers and risk mangers ultimately out "rank" us all.
    Very good!
  7. 0
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Sorry, all advance practice nurses are created equally. None of them is superior to any other, and I don't know anyone who thinks otherwise except students who don't know any better.
    *** If you mean CNM is equal to NP and NP is equal to CRNA then I agree. However they are not all created equally. Some are much better at their jobs than others on an individual level.
  8. 0
    Quote from myelin
    I really don't think this bickering between PAs and NPs helps either of our fields. Most agree that a few years into practice, the differences between NPs and PAs is minute. I wish the fields were more supportive of eachother.
    agreed strongly. unfortunately, there is lots of misinformation that ought to be cleared up. but our fields more or less occupy the same niche in healthcare with subtle differences. Therefore uniting to meet common goals will almost always be in our best interest.

    And on the contrary, those who would oppose our interests would rather have us divided. This would be true for any movement.
  9. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I believe you but don't see that information in the link you provied. I had already found that site as well but without goig to each school's website I didn't see how you could determine what kind of program they were. They used to list them by state with degree listed after. I notice they don't do that anymore.
    What has been the motivation for more and more programs going to the masters degree? Were PAs prepared at other levels shows to inadiquatly prepared?
    I don't know a single listing that lists all programs and what degrees are offered. The one core0 provided has all the info, it just takes longer to get at because you'd need to click on each state individually. Take, for example my state of Texas. click on it, and you'll see each PA program in texas and which degree it offers (M, B, or C). In that case, there is one program offering a C, or B which is the program for those in the Army.

    As for why the motivation for more programs to go for masters degree, i can't say definitively since i haven't read discussions of those decisions, however I'd venture to say it is in sync with all heatlhcare fields who have had degree creep. ask why NPs have chosen to go to DNP. answer is probably the same.
  10. 0
    I don't know a single listing that lists all programs and what degrees are offered.

    *** I don't either anymore. The site coreO listed used to a few years ago when I frist started looking into it and was the site I was thinking of in my previous statements.

    The one core0 provided has all the info, it just takes longer to get at because you'd need to click on each state individually. Take, for example my state of Texas. click on it, and you'll see each PA program in texas and which degree it offers (M, B, or C). In that case, there is one program offering a C, or B which is the program for those in the Army.

    *** Yes I see that. When I look at the state of PA I see 21 programs listed with 6 having a "B" and one not saying. CA lists 9 programs with 3 having an "A", though "C" & "M" are also listed for those schools. NY lists 23 programs with 8 of them having a "B" listed. Even though masters program have now become the majority it would seem a sizable minority are still below the masters level. I find this to be a real shame.

    As for why the motivation for more programs to go for masters degree, i can't say definitively since i haven't read discussions of those decisions, however I'd venture to say it is in sync with all heatlhcare fields who have had degree creep. ask why NPs have chosen to go to DNP. answer is probably the same.

    *** Well NPs haven't chosen to go to the DNP. The AACN recomends it but it is far from being a requirement. In my opinion the recomendation for DNP is a symptom of nursing's lack of self esteem as a profession combined with the desire for colleges of nursing to be able to charge far more for thier NP programs than they can with a masters level program.
    I hate to see this needless degree creep in both fields. The PA and NP are supposed to be cost effective providers of health care. I can't see where any good can come of drasticaly increasing the cost and time required to train them. Since neither's move twords higher degrees for the same training has resulted in higher pay for them it becomes even more confusing to me. NP is already on a tenious cost of training vs potential income plane. Most people I know who went to NP school went to get a better schedual since they are unlikely to make more than they were making as staff RNs. Several I know have taken pay cuts to be NPs. However I am sure in places with lower RN pay than we enjoy that might not be the case.


Top