in choosing an NP specialty - page 2

Hello everyone. I'm new here. This board seems so wonderful! Everyone is helpful and friendly....I'm so glad I stumbled upon it. Anyway, here is my question: One of the local state... Read More

  1. by   sirI
    I don't think it is unpopular, just rather new. I've not seen NP programs in the Med-Surg specialty.

    But, Rush University does have a combined Med-Surg Clinical Nurse Specialist/Adult NP program that looks interesting:

    http://www.rushu.rush.edu/nursing/po...gical_cns.html

    And, Southeren Illinois University at Edwardsville has a Med-Surg CNS program, too:

    http://www.siue.edu/NURSING/programs..._surgical.html

    University of Michigan has an ACNP program with a Masters/Post-Masters in Med-Surg nursing.

    http://www.nursing.umich.edu/academi...urriculum.html
  2. by   traumaRUs
    I am actually a med-surg Clinical Nurse Specialist! It is a pretty broad track covering acute, chronic and geriatrics.
  3. by   tnd511
    NP wannabe, This program is a CNS not an NP program....if I am reading it correctly. There is a hugh difference between the two. An Np can work as a CNS BUT a CNS CAN'T work as an NP.

    Edited to add: Do they have a post master's cert. if you are interested in becoming an NP?

    Also, if you choose, say, Adult NP and don't really like it or want something new, most universities will let you take the additional classes and then you can test for a different concentration like FNP.....KWIM? You are never locked into one career FOREVER.....not in Nursing anyway!
    Last edit by tnd511 on Oct 9, '06
  4. by   np_wannabe
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I am actually a med-surg Clinical Nurse Specialist! It is a pretty broad track covering acute, chronic and geriatrics.
    You're a med-surg CNS? That's awesome! I read what you did/where you work somewhere else, and remember thinking that you have a lot of variety in what you do. If I remember correctly, you work in a nephrology clinic and you work a few shifts a month at the ER?

    If you ever wanted to do good 'ole FNP on day, could you make a case for being qualified for that?

    Thanks again, Trauma.

    You are a wealth of information.
  5. by   np_wannabe
    Quote from tnd511
    NP wannabe, This program is a CNS not an NP program....if I am reading it correctly. There is a hugh difference between the two. An Np can work as a CNS BUT a CNS CAN'T work as an NP.

    Edited to add: Do they have a post master's cert. if you are interested in becoming an NP?

    Also, if you choose, say, Adult NP and don't really like it or want something new, most universities will let you take the additional classes and then you can test for a different concentration like FNP.....KWIM? You are never locked into one career FOREVER.....not in Nursing anyway!
    Thanks tnd511. They DO have post-master's certs, so that is a good back-up plan. I'm hoping to do something nice a broad so that I don't have to go back. AGAIN! I've already been a full-time college student for 7 years (grad school), and now I'm looking at an accelerated BSN and grad school for the MSN. .... I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this....
  6. by   traumaRUs
    Oh thanks (trauma blushes).

    I do like my job and feel that at least in IL - this is the right role for me. I will say though that I would probably not be happy with a true CNS role.



    tnd511 - I just wanted to address your statement that a CNS can't practice as an NP. This depends a lot on the state in which you practice. I am part of a large nephrology practice and I practice with three other FNP's and my role is exactly the same as theirs. So....in my situation, I am practicing the same as an FNP.

    I almost support the position of getting rid of the CNS role and grandfathering those of us that are in an advanced practice role into an NP role. (I need to learn more of the details before I can fully endorse it). The CNS role is actually one of education of staff and patients. However, the individual states govern how one practices. For instance, in PA and GA - these states don't recognize a CNS as an advanced practice role.
  7. by   sailornurse
    [FONT="Arial Black"][QUOTE=np_wannabe]Hi Everybody.

    Thank you for your input. I have decided to do something nice and broad--I'm thinking Med-Surg. It seems that it is broad enough so that I would be able to work in a hospital (or make a case for working FNP???). I have some time still. [FONT="Fixedsys"]I am not sure what you mean by "making a case for working as FNP. The 2 roles are very different. You can not work or call yourself a Family Nurse Practitioner if you are a Med- surg CNS. Med Surg CNS do not see pediatric patients nor do they do women's health care. FNP is very broad, but more marketable. We have very broad scope of practice, can work in many area, some are working with Cardiology/Neurosurg or in local ER's as fast track/urgent care providers.:blushkiss

    This all came up because I started thinking about the flexibility of a PA degree, and how the NP does not have that same versatility (and I'm not here to start a NP v. PA, so please don't start one either)....I just started feeling like a NP degree would leave me a little "locked in."


    [FONT="Book Antiqua"]I disagree. Here in New Mexico NP's have completle independent practice. No need for MD to collaborate/supervise. PA's work under the physicians license, not independent at all. Pa's are the one's that are locked in. sounds like you are still not clear on the different types of NP & CNS specialties that currently exist.
  8. by   sailornurse
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Oh thanks (trauma blushes).

    I do like my job and feel that at least in IL - this is the right role for me. I will say though that I would probably not be happy with a true CNS role. Exacly what is the true role? Please explain what you mean. Are you not working in the true role?



    tnd511 - I just wanted to address your statement that a CNS can't practice as an NP. This depends a lot on the state in which you practice. I am part of a large nephrology practice and I practice with three other FNP's and my role is exactly the same as theirs. So....in my situation, I am practicing the same as an FNP. XX not working in your true role--that still does not mean that you are practicing in the role of FNP. The education of FNP is very different from CNS. NP education is much more stringent. Check with the NONPF ( National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty) guidleines. XXXX

    I almost support the position of getting rid of the CNS role and grandfathering those of us that are in an advanced practice role into an NP role. (I need to learn more of the details before I can fully endorse it). The CNS role is actually one of education of staff and patients. However, the individual states govern how one practices. For instance, in PA and GA - these states don't recognize a CNS as an advanced practice role.
    And many NP's oppose this proposal by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. There are major differences in the educational preparation & the roles between NP's & CNS. Doing away with the CNS role is not the answer to the initial problem, that of different state boards either not recognizing CNS's as advanced practice or limiting the scope of practice. NP's also have to battle the differences from state to state & continue to do so. To think that CNS could call simply be called Np's by being "grandfathered" isl ludicrous. XXXXX
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 19, '06 : Reason: TOS
  9. by   traumaRUs
    Hi Sailornurse - just wanted to reiterate that the programs that I am aware of (UIC and UofI in IL) have very similar programs. Since I did a post-MSN CNS, my courses consisted of only the clinical courses such as adv pharm, assessment, adv pathophys and then of course my clinical hours.

    In IL, there is no difference in the nurse practice act between NP's and CNS's. The role is determined by the job that you have. In my job, I work with three FNP's. Our roles, responsibilities, salary, practice is exactly the same.

    In my previous post, I should have stated that it is only my opinion that the CNS could be eliminated.

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