Hunter College NYC ANP program

  1. 0
    Hello. I recently applied to and was accepted to Hunter College's ANP program in NYC?
    Is there anyone on this board who is in Hunter's grad nursing program?

    Can anyone give me advice?

    What are some of the things to expect?

    Is it a difficult program?

    How are clinicals?

    How are the professors?

    WIll it be hard for me to work full time and go to school part time?

    Thank you
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  5. 0
    Congrats on your Hunter acceptance!

    I graduated from Hunter's primary care adult nurse practitioner program in 2001. Dr. X, who is still the coordinator, is the best. She is very supportive and her goal is for you to succeed. There was one professor who started back then and many students had trouble with her, but I don't see her listed on the faculty directory anymore. Otherwise, they were very supportive.

    Hunter is a CUNY school, therefore some of the perks you would get from a private school might not be readily available at Hunter. Will you get a good education? Absolutely! Will you need to be proactive and do some homework and groundwork? You bet!

    I don't think the program was difficult, but it was definately challenging. I studied more than when I worked towards my associate or bachelor degrees, and in both of those programs I was top of my class. I think in advance practice programs in general, you realize the tremendous level of responsibily. It forces you to study for understanding versus just to get an A. (If I remember well, you must maintain a 3.0 in order to stay in the program).

    I worked about 30 hours most week while I attended part-time (7-9 credits). Some people worked full-time, others part-time and a few did not work. I think it will depend on how demanding your job is, as well as your family responsibities. When I started my clinicals, I had to get really good at time management since I was usually in clinic 2 days for 8 hours, + my classes, + work. With clinicals, you can be really flexible. Most of the details you will work out with your preceptors.

    I don't know if this is still practiced, but back then we were responsible for securing our own clinicals. We were told we would simple have to take whatever the school had if you weren't successful in finding a spot. I was initially concerned since friends of mine attending a private school in Manhattan had their clinicals arranged for them by the school. It actually turned out fine and it forced students to become proactive in their learning. You learn quickly the types of experiences you want and you try to obtain that. Usually, you make contacts with hospitals, clinics and doctors offices in you area. Some will say no, others will say yes. You may also find it helpful to speak with students who are a semester ahead of you. People were good about sharing their contacts. If you are in the Bronx, I know a fabulous woman for woman's health. She is still my friend today. I have two contacts for a primary care clinics, and another for an HIV clinic. The HIV clinic was a really good experience. Hunter student health (main campus) is another contact. It is good for early clinicals since the learning is somewhat limited. You get a lot of practice doing physicals as students need to be cleared in order to participate in sports.

    I also suggest (and I am sure Dr. X will also) you get one of those NP review books early on. They offer great preparation for patho exams. Make sure you read and understand the explainations. Utilize the media center (I think on the M level). The tapes are great for self-learning. Lots of Physical Exam tapes and tapes that go over different diseases. For the Physical Assessment class, there is a practical exam you must pass. Make sure both you and your partner practice.

    Let me know if you have any other questions. Congrats again, and enjoy the ride.


    Quote from kimaboogie00
    Hello. I recently applied to and was accepted to Hunter College's ANP program in NYC?
    Is there anyone on this board who is in Hunter's grad nursing program?

    Can anyone give me advice?

    What are some of the things to expect?

    Is it a difficult program?

    How are clinicals?

    How are the professors?

    WIll it be hard for me to work full time and go to school part time?

    Thank you
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 3, '05 : Reason: edit name
  6. 0
    Thanks so much DiegoT. All of your insight was very helpful. I meet w/ Dr. X next tuesday. Do you mind if I correspond w/ you from time to time to ask questions. By the way I am from and currently live in the Bronx. I would absolutely love to use you women's healt contact as a precpetor. I am so interested in women's health it is not even funny. I chose to go in to an ANP for more flexibilty but am scared that I wont have too much background in women's health...where I am destined to work! Any pointers on that issue. Are there a huge number of papers we have to write? I just bought a laptop so I am ready. Was it easy for you to find a job after graduating? I work at NYP on 68th st for 36hrs / week, no kids, no husband , i am 24, and plan to go to school part time....sounds good? Are you happy w/ your decision to become an ANP?

    As you can see I have so many questions. I look forward to your responsesand please don't rush as I know you are busy w/ your own career and whatever life throws at you.

    Thanks in advance
    Takima
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 3, '05 : Reason: edit name
  7. 0
    Quote from kimaboogie00
    Thanks so much DiegoT. All of your insight was very helpful. I meet w/ Dr. X next tuesday. Do you mind if I correspond w/ you from time to time to ask questions. By the way I am from and currently live in the Bronx. I would absolutely love to use you women's healt contact as a precpetor. I am so interested in women's health it is not even funny. I chose to go in to an ANP for more flexibilty but am scared that I wont have too much background in women's health...where I am destined to work! Any pointers on that issue. Are there a huge number of papers we have to write? I just bought a laptop so I am ready. Was it easy for you to find a job after graduating? I work at NYP on 68th st for 36hrs / week, no kids, no husband , i am 24, and plan to go to school part time....sounds good? Are you happy w/ your decision to become an ANP?

    As you can see I have so many questions. I look forward to your responsesand please don't rush as I know you are busy w/ your own career and whatever life throws at you.

    Thanks in advance
    Takima
    Wow, you are from the Bronx? Small world, so am I. I currently reside in Philly but I still maintain my Bronx residence (1 floor rented). I don't mind you asking questions. That is what I enjoy about forums like these...the sharing of info.

    Personally, I think going the ANP route vs. the Woman's health, even if you want to end up in woman's health, is the smart way to go. As an ANP you may do woman's health or anything else within your scope, but it doesn't work the other way around. My former preceptor is a Woman's Health NP and she loves it, but has mentioned that her focus was too narrow. There are limitations as to what she is able to do. Actually, there is a moderator here who did woman's health then went back for the FNP. I think the FNP offers even more opportunities than the ANP, but if you are like me and have no interest in working with kids or doing OB etc, then I don't think it matters.

    In terms of the amount of exposure to woman's health, you will be very active in determining that (atleast if the program is still the same). We were required to do a specific number of clinical hours, and since primary care is the specialty, it was expected most of it was done in a primary care setting. I think people were asked to make sure they did atleast 24 hrs. of woman's health. I can tell you, I enjoyed woman's health, and did more than twice that. I also enjoyed HIV and spent additional time there. I went to a physician's office in Rockland County and felt it was a waste of time, and decided not to spend too much time there. Areas that I liked or found challenging, I stayed longer. As I said, back then, you made the arrangements with your preceptors and they were usually accommodating.

    As far as jobs, back in 2001 in NY, it was a challenge to find NP jobs. I remember some classmates being very concerned and unhappy as they felt they graduated and there weren't many jobs available. I think it is much better now. I actually taught for 1 year, then relocated to Florida for a job. The job was great, (learned alot), but boy.... I felt that NY was much more NP friendly. The facility I worked for really placed a lot of limitations on the "physician extenders," and all our (PAs and NPs) orders had to be co-signed by the MD. I think that was just an individual facility thing. I do have another friend in another part of FL who felt there was some limitations to practice. Right now I am in Philadelphia, and there seem to be many NP positions here. I also spent time in Maryland, and saw many openings there. I really don't know what the practice environment is like in MD though, and maybe someone else who is more knowledgeable about NY can comment on the current NY market.

    I think once you are in the program, especially if your are working for a hospital that hires NP, you need to start networking early. Some of my classmates recieved NP jobs where they worked as RNs. I would seek out other NPs and PAs at NYP as they can point you in the right direction. Maybe a semester or two before you graduate, you could speak with the recruiter.

    As for papers, there were some in the research and nursing theory classes etc. Once you get to patho, it's mainly reading and integrating what you learn with your clinical experience + lots of case studies (which I loved). Physical assessment is reading and practice lab + your practical exam. Pharmacology was a lot of memorization (of course you had to understand what you were studying but you needed to know classes of drugs, indications,actions, S/E, why you would prescribe one over the other, etc). I think I didn't care too much for the nursing theory class, but loved the patho, pharm and PE. I loved learning that stuff and putting it all together. I actually plan on returning to school next year.

    Good luck
    DeigoT
  8. 0
    Quote from deigot
    wow, you are from the bronx? small world, so am i. i currently reside in philly but i still maintain my bronx residence (1 floor rented). i don't mind you asking questions. that is what i enjoy about forums like these...the sharing of info.

    personally, i think going the anp route vs. the woman's health, even if you want to end up in woman's health, is the smart way to go. as an anp you may do woman's health or anything else within your scope, but it doesn't work the other way around. my former preceptor is a woman's health np and she loves it, but has mentioned that her focus was too narrow. there are limitations as to what she is able to do. actually, there is a moderator here who did woman's health then went back for the fnp. i think the fnp offers even more opportunities than the anp, but if you are like me and have no interest in working with kids or doing ob etc, then i don't think it matters.

    in terms of the amount of exposure to woman's health, you will be very active in determining that (atleast if the program is still the same). we were required to do a specific number of clinical hours, and since primary care is the specialty, it was expected most of it was done in a primary care setting. i think people were asked to make sure they did atleast 24 hrs. of woman's health. i can tell you, i enjoyed woman's health, and did more than twice that. i also enjoyed hiv and spent additional time there. i went to a physician's office in rockland county and felt it was a waste of time, and decided not to spend too much time there. areas that i liked or found challenging, i stayed longer. as i said, back then, you made the arrangements with your preceptors and they were usually accommodating.

    as far as jobs, back in 2001 in ny, it was a challenge to find np jobs. i remember some classmates being very concerned and unhappy as they felt they graduated and there weren't many jobs available. i think it is much better now. i actually taught for 1 year, then relocated to florida for a job. the job was great, (learned alot), but boy.... i felt that ny was much more np friendly. the facility i worked for really placed a lot of limitations on the "physician extenders," and all our (pas and nps) orders had to be co-signed by the md. i think that was just an individual facility thing. i do have another friend in another part of fl who felt there was some limitations to practice. right now i am in philadelphia, and there seem to be many np positions here. i also spent time in maryland, and saw many openings there. i really don't know what the practice environment is like in md though, and maybe someone else who is more knowledgeable about ny can comment on the current ny market.

    i think once you are in the program, especially if your are working for a hospital that hires np, you need to start networking early. some of my classmates recieved np jobs where they worked as rns. i would seek out other nps and pas at nyp as they can point you in the right direction. maybe a semester or two before you graduate, you could speak with the recruiter.

    as for papers, there were some in the research and nursing theory classes etc. once you get to patho, it's mainly reading and integrating what you learn with your clinical experience + lots of case studies (which i loved). physical assessment is reading and practice lab + your practical exam. pharmacology was a lot of memorization (of course you had to understand what you were studying but you needed to know classes of drugs, indications,actions, s/e, why you would prescribe one over the other, etc). i think i didn't care too much for the nursing theory class, but loved the patho, pharm and pe. i loved learning that stuff and putting it all together. i actually plan on returning to school next year.

    good luck
    deigot
    hi, deigot,

    that moderator would be i. yes, i am ob-gyn np and was just this for about 8 years, then decided that if i didn't want to pay most of my salary in liability rates, i had to do something. i tried to get an np job with that cert only to find most of the employers wanted an fnp. that did it for me. i secured the fnp and never looked back.

    now, i am so glad i did the former because it has really helped me to be very marketable. i take er call frequently and when i have an ob present in active labor and need to be delievered, i can do this. this is not the case in all facilities. being fnp, i see everything, but, that is what i really like. my first love is ob, that's true. but, i like the rest of it, too.

    so, i suggest the anp as you have stated for the op, since that is what is being discussed here. but, if anyone asked my opinion on the track to take, i would have to say fnp. at least, in my part of the country.....
  9. 0
    Hey again DiegoT. I just had my meeting with ANP adivosor Dr. X. She was real cool but I already started to see the difference in dealing with administration in city schools as opposed to private institutions. Oh well...i am up for the challenge since I am a big girl now...lol!

    Dr. X told me that only one student in the past has had a clinical at a women's health clinic and I think that she was reffering to you. So I was wondering if you mind sending me an email or or PM -ing me the contact info for your WH preceptor in the Bronx. If you can't I will understand. If you can that would be great but I don't even know the 1st thing about how PM-ing or giving you my email address works on this board. If you can help me w/ that it would be great.

    Thanks in advance
    kimaboogie
  10. 0
    Quote from kimaboogie00
    I don't even know the 1st thing about how PM-ing or giving you my email address works on this board. If you can help me w/ that it would be great.
    Click on the person's name, ie., "kimaboogie" and a new window will pop up with some links. You can also add your email to your public profile by clicking on "User CP" way up at the top left of the page that you are on.
  11. 0
    Hello, I am looking into NP programs. I am from Boston, but I was looking to go else where. I actually want to go Hunter college for the Adult/Geri program. Has anyone here took that route. Is it worth doing both or just picking either the ANP or GNP. Also the website says it takes about 5 yrs does it really take that long even if your part time.
  12. 0
    I just applied for the adult / gerontological np at Hunter for the fall 2012. Any body else?
  13. 0
    Ok, so I did not get in because according to Hunter I only have 9 months of RN experience and they want at least 1 yr. My GPA in BSN nursing of 3.91 was not enough. They told me to reapply for the spring 2013 since i'll have the experience necessary to get into the program. On the other hand NYU did accept me for the acute care np but they don't want to give me any scholarships . I guess i'll wait for spring 2013.


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