Help on NP Route... Am I Getting This Right?

  1. 2
    I'm hoping to get some advice from some of the awesome nurses here. I'm very new, and not even in nursing school... yet... and am doing a ton of research online. Here's my short story:

    I'm a young male chiropractor, and although I love what I do, I would like to learn and be exposed to more.

    It broke my heart last week when I had 2 patients that were in such bad shape, I couldn't help them. They couldn't lay on the table, they couldn't move without pain, they were just miserable. I wanted to help them so badly, but it's beyond my scope and my control.

    I've been thinking about becoming a nurse practitioner for when I have situations like these. I like the holistic approach a NP has, its approaches towards wellness, and I think it would compliment my chiropractic education nicely. It would fill in the blanks, and expose me to much more than just musculoskeltal injuries.

    Because chiropractic school is sooooooo expensive, I need to become an NP as cost effective, and of course, as fast track as possible. I researched BSN, ABSN, and ADN programs (I think that's all the letters )

    And I found out that to go an RN-MSN or RN-DNP bridge... I can start BSN or ADN.

    Which surprises me greatly. The most inexpensive ABSN program I can find is around 18K, with most in the 30-60K range. An ADN program would probably cost me around 3K (if I factor in all my preqs I already have). The RN to DNP is about another 30K.

    I apologize for the long story, but basically... if DNP is my goal, I should go for the ADN right? It might cost me another 6-12 months of life, but as far as finances go, it would be the cheaper way to DNP? Are there any advantages to going with a BSN rather than ADN?

    Thanks, and Happy Mothers Day to all the Moms. I swear if it wasn't for my mother, I never would of accomplished as much as I have already

    Loque
    BHC710 and futurernjap like this.
  2. 13 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Do you already have a bachelor's degree? I have heard of generic to MSN programs. (You'd have to look around. I know University of San Francisco... the private Jesuit school, not the state run University... used to have one.) Then MSN to NP in just a few semesters.
  4. 0
    I wouldagree that generic BSN program would be a better fit. Some of those programs even do the NP immediately following RN license requirement portions.
  5. 0
    Quote from jmqphd
    Do you already have a bachelor's degree? I have heard of generic to MSN programs. (You'd have to look around. I know University of San Francisco... the private Jesuit school, not the state run University... used to have one.) Then MSN to NP in just a few semesters.
    Yes, I already have a bachelor's degree. The Direct MSN is a great idea, however I have found that many of them are non-stop for 3 years. I can't afford to not work such a long period of time.

    A good point was brought up about how BSN can go directly into NP after licensure. I didn't know about that. That sounds like a plus because I heard a year experience is needed to go to NP for an RN.
  6. 0
    An ADN is a 2 year (AA) for nursing. Because you have a Bachelors already, that would be a step backward, IMO. As mentioned, there are programs out there for folks with a Bachelors in a non- nursing field. Might be wrong, but the 3 year programs are part time - I think a full time program is 2 years. I intend to do mine online, and continue working.

    Oh, and check out the NP board under "specialty" I recently asked why some schools have the generic MSN, then a FNP etc certificate.

    Good luck!
    Last edit by Heidi the nurse on May 8, '11 : Reason: more info
  7. 0
    Quote from Heidi the nurse
    An ADN is a 2 year (AA) for nursing. Because you have a Bachelors already, that would be a step backward, IMO. As mentioned, there are programs out there for folks with a Bachelors in a non- nursing field. Might be wrong, but the 3 year programs are part time - I think a full time program is 2 years. I intend to do mine online, and continue working.

    Oh, and check out the NP board under "specialty" I recently asked why some schools have the generic MSN, then a FNP etc certificate.

    Good luck!
    Sweet Thanks alot, and good luck to you too
  8. 0
    You can definitely go for your NP right from your BSN. You will, of course, get your MSN or DNP before you can be licensed to be an NP. But the roles of an NP and an RN are very different. Some people will insist you need at least one year experience as an RN to be an NP, but in many specialties that's not a hard-and-fast rule. I am doing my adult and gerontological health MSN at a large university nursing school and many of my classmates have not had bedside RN experience. I choose to work as an RN because I have many bills to pay. Why don't you schedule an interview with the dean or admissions officer at some schools? (I would lean toward the BSN, not the ASN.) They might be thrilled to have a chiropractor as a nursing student and they could clue you in to any scholarships you might be eligible for.
  9. 0
    The grants and scholarship thing is something I'd def have to look into. Everyone has brought up great points about the BSN over the ADN, but in order to do that I'd probably have to get some financial help. My student debt is about 100K already, and I'm not sure how much more financial aid I would qualify for in a BSN program.

    I think I'd be like you and work for a little while also (or go for DNP part time while working) to help with bills. Plus, I have heard nurses may be able to get loan forgivness after 10 years. The sooner I can start that, the better

    I'll probably apply for the ABSN programs first and see how that goes. I only have a 3.3 GPA, so my backup will be ADN.
  10. 0
    Here is a link to the loan forgiveness program:

    http://www.hrsa.gov/loanscholarships/repayment/nursing/

    Of course it is a government program so there is a chance funding may go away, but I was pleased to find most of my state is considered underserved. There is also a tab for grants - haven't had a chance to look though it yet, but I do believe there are grants out there available too.
  11. 1
    OMG how coincidental!! My classmate is a chiropractor!! We are both graduating this week actually. He is becoming an RN also for an eventual NP degree for the very same reason as you. He is in his 50s though so he didn't have to have a bachelors when he started (he started young too). He plans to work on an orthopedic med/surg floor, as a matter of fact, before going for his FNP (which suits him fine lol). He said that it's becoming somewhat harder to practice as a chiropractor now these days and he wanted an avenue to help enhance his practice. These days, the BSN seems to be the more marketable degree, so I would recommend that route. My classmate goes to school and works part time at his chiropractic office. He knows of a few practitioner programs that have a route for chiropractors. I will ask him to give you the names if you are interested (and if you would like to ask him for advice, he's always willing to help!). He works really hard in class (and was an awesome tutor, especially with those dreaded musculoskeletal exams! ) and would give me *free* adjustments LOL. Chiropractors in nursing are a great asset! Good Luck to you. (Ooh, and definately look at the previous posters Loan Forgiveness link!)
    Last edit by Trilldayz,RN BSN on May 9, '11
    BrookeeLou_RN likes this.


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