Hate being an RN

  1. 0
    I'm a new grad working in ER and acute care. I dread going to my job in acute care each shift. I like what I do in the ER, but hate how the docs treat the nurses - short and condescending, and just plain mean and rude constantly. I'm already getting tired of it. "Yes sir'ing every order", apologizing when they're mad (all the time) even when nothing was done wrong. I'm fairly young now and can't imagine getting being treated like crap and with such disrespect when I'm older.

    I've been wodering if I went into the wrong field altogether...but maybe I just need to be the boss. I have a bacehlor's degree in business administration, and an ADN. With NP becoming a doctorate program and increasing in length and cost, I'm wondering if FNP is still the way to go, considering they get paid significantly less than doctors. Any thoughts on this? And are FNP's respected, or are they treated like scum like the RNs are? I'm getting really tired of giving up my seat when I'm charting everytime a doctor comes into the nurse's station. Rrrrrr!
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  3. 35 Comments so far...

  4. 9
    I've been in nursing a few decades now, and have never been treated the way you describe (sure, I've had occasional, individual bad experiences with a few individual physicians, but nothing systemic and ongoing). Some of the problem is working in a setting/culture in which this is tolerated by TPTB, and some of it is how the individual nurse presents her/himself and what s/he is willing to put up with. In my experience, this is not representative of nursing at large.

    However, as a new graduate, you have quite a ways to go before you're ready or prepared to "be the boss." Best wishes for your journey.
    jmef99nurse, Ruby Vee, dudette10, and 6 others like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    However, as a new graduate, you have quite a ways to go before you're ready or prepared to "be the boss." Best wishes for your journey.
    Not really. I believe most FNP programs only require 1 year of nursing experience, which means I could apply to a program in the spring.
  6. 5
    I misunderstood your reference to "being the boss." I thought you were talking about an administrative role, rather than an advanced practice clinical role, esp. since you mentioned your baccalaureate degree in business administration. (I've been an advanced practice nurse for many years, but I've never been a "boss;" neither have most of the other advanced practice nurses I've known.)
    Guttercat, nrsang97, Retired APRN, and 2 others like this.
  7. 4
    Having that year experience doesn't mean you would be "ready".
    nrsang97, Retired APRN, cardiacfreak, and 1 other like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from loriangel14
    Having that year experience doesn't mean you would be "ready".
    Continuing to work during NP school would make 4 years of RN experience. And is the role of the PA not similar to that of the NP? And are they required to have any experience as nurses, etc., before becoming practitioners?
    Suey816 likes this.
  9. 8
    The question is, what makes you think that being a NP will make you a boss? Top of the totem pole adminstrators and some independent practitioners get to be THE boss.

    I get what you mean though, you want to be respected. That can be had as an RN, just depends on the workplace culture and how you represent yourself.
    LakeEmerald, TriciaJ, Kipahni, and 5 others like this.
  10. 3
    Quote from elkpark
    I've been in nursing a few decades now, and have never been treated the way you describe (sure, I've had occasional, individual bad experiences with a few individual physicians, but nothing systemic and ongoing). Some of the problem is working in a setting/culture in which this is tolerated by TPTB, and some of it is how the individual nurse presents her/himself and what s/he is willing to put up with. In my experience, this is not representative of nursing at large.

    However, as a new graduate, you have quite a ways to go before you're ready or prepared to "be the boss." Best wishes for your journey.
    Same here - I've been a nurse for more than 20 years and can count on one hand the times I was treated like crap - and never experienced it to the extent that you described.

    Is it more prevalent in your area? If so, you may be dealing with some of the same as a NP too.

    Anne, RNC
    SoldierNurse22, nrsang97, and elkpark like this.
  11. 1
    Sounds llike you (OP) need to find a new job no matter what your plans for the future are. All of us can share a story about a mean physician or bad encounter, but what you are describing sounds like a systemic problem at your place of employment. Respect is relative. I am an FNP student, but in my role as a CVICU nurse I, and all my coworkers get a tremendous amount of respect from physicians and our administration. You could be a physician and it won't do you any good if your work at a terrible place like you describe.

    The role of NP and PA is similar, however if you work in state that allows NP's to practice without needing a physician over them, you have a great deal more autonomy. I'm not aware of any state where a PA can do as they please and open their own clinic without oversite. Roughly 1/3 of states in the US already allow NP's to do this.


    Lastly, there are still dozens if not hundreds of FNP schools that currently have no plan to convert to DNP programs as that is just a recommendation and not a requirement.
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  12. 5
    MILOBRI, I started as a brand new nurse in the OR after a successful career in another field. I stuck it out for 2 years but I felt very unsuccessful and cried a lot the first two years and thought about getting out of nursing. After 2 years I went to work in hospice and I began to learn more and do more. Now, almost 5 years later I believe I have the respect of others but more importantly I found a nurturing environment with some great nurses who helped me through being a novice nurse. I have people calling me to ask if I want to come work in their company. I also have learned that the hospital where I was working was a toxic environment so that may be your situation and you may need to get away from there. Sometimes our feelings of being persecuted can come from our own insecurities about being new and even though we may not admit it to ourselves we know in our heart of hearts that we truly do have a lot to learn. Respect isn't instant and it is earned. At least, that was my experience. By the way, I went on to get my masters in nursing education and I am currently in FNP school...
    LakeEmerald, Ruas61, NaCl-ty, and 2 others like this.


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