done some soul searching, any thoughts?

  1. I am registered to begin an MSN program focusing on education in the spring, but am having second thoughts. I am a very accomplished clinical nurse, and feel unsettled pursuing a graduate program that does not have a clinical component. The institution I am registered with offers a dual degree ANP/CNS and a post-master's certificate as an ANP. I enjoy education, but do not see a future in nursing for myself that is far removed from clinical, acute care.

    So my options are, I can complete the MSN in education and go back for the certificate, or request to switch tracks within my institution to become a ANP/ CNS. Timewise, both options will take about the same amount, but going back for the certificate will cost me more money.

    My husband is so tired of talking about this with me. I need some valuable nursing input!!

    Cardiac-RN, BSN, PCCN
    •  
  2. 35 Comments

  3. by   CardioTrans
    Hi there!

    First off, congrats on starting grad school!

    Ok, why did you decide to do the education track? If you honestly can't see yourself being so far away from clinical nursing, ask yourself exactly what you can do with it....... yeah, you could do education in a hospital for the staff.....but there again, you may be away from direct clinical nursing.

    If you did it to have an MSN to teach clinicals.......you can teach clinicals with an NP degree....and work as an NP in direct patient care.....

    My grad program allows you to take so many hours as a "non-degree seeking student", and almost all of the classes that are required pre-reqs are all the same for every MSN degree, whether it is NP, education, management or whatever. Does your school allow that?? If so, you could switch to a non-degree seeking student until you decide which route is better for you or which you would enjoy more.

    Good luck with whatever you decide!
  4. by   Cardiac-RN
    I applied for the education track because I do enjoy education and wanted the specific teaching/ learning/ curriculum courses, which are not included in any of the np tracks- except the ANP/ CNS (which I did not realize at the time). Now it feels like I do not have to choose one or the other (clinical or education) but rather can have the best of both worlds. As I have not started the actually classes, I am hoping they will allow me to change tracks.

    Thanks for the input :spin:
  5. by   traumaRUs
    In IL, you have to have an MSN in order to teach nursing. I did an MSN (nonclinical) in management and leadership. I too really liked the clinical side so pursued the adult health CNS track as a post-MSN certificate. I wish you luck with whatever you decide.
  6. by   DaisyRN, ACNP
    Quote from traumarus
    in il, you have to have an msn in order to teach nursing. i did an msn (nonclinical) in management and leadership. i too really liked the clinical side so pursued the adult health cns track as a post-msn certificate. i wish you luck with whatever you decide.
    [font="comic sans ms"]
    does il not award nps with an msn? i did the acnp program with 6 core msn courses and received both. therefore, could teach right now. or did you mean they require an msn in education?

  7. by   SuesquatchRN
    I've never heard og any MSN equalling an NP cert.

    Personally, I can't imagine wasting time on something I don't want to do - like teaching.

    Go straight for what you want.
  8. by   mvanz9999
    Not that I should butt in, but I think Trauma is saying that she got an MSN in management and leadership (which would allow teaching) and then went back and did a post-masters cert for adult health CNS.

    I am not aware of any way to get an NP certification without having a MSN. But you can obviously get an MSN without any APN certification.

    I agree with Sue..., switch and stick with clinical practice.
  9. by   core0
    Quote from mvanz9999
    Not that I should butt in, but I think Trauma is saying that she got an MSN in management and leadership (which would allow teaching) and then went back and did a post-masters cert for adult health CNS.

    I am not aware of any way to get an NP certification without having a MSN. But you can obviously get an MSN without any APN certification.

    I agree with Sue..., switch and stick with clinical practice.
    According to the AACN there are still 2 FNP programs and one WHNP programs that do not give out an MSN. Looking at this the FNP programs may be the Stanford and UC Davis PA programs which will no longer offer the NP option. That does leave one WHNP program that does not offer an MSN. This may be a post certificate program that only takes MSNs but it is listed as other than school of nursing.

    Another option would be the Clinical Nurse Leader MSN which might be more appropriate for someone who wants to do clinical nursing without the advance practice component.
    For an example:http://www.nursing.virginia.edu/Programs/cnl.aspx

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  10. by   Cardiac-RN
    Quote from core0
    Another option would be the Clinical Nurse Leader MSN which might be more appropriate for someone who wants to do clinical nursing without the advance practice component.
    For an example:http://www.nursing.virginia.edu/Programs/cnl.aspx
    David Carpenter, PA-C
    Thank you David, but the clinical nurse leader program is an entry-level to practice one that prepares unlicensed persons to sit for the NCLEX and then be generalists, and I am already a licensed RN.

    Anyways, after discussing the situation more at length with my advisor, I have decided to remain in my education track and pursue a certificate afterwards. Thanks to all who gave input!

    Cardiac-RN, BSN, PCCN
  11. by   CNM2B
    I just wanted to jump in and say that at least here, in Ohio, the universities that I know of that offer the CNL (Clinical Nurse Leader)program is not an entry to practice. My university will offer the CNM/NP/CNS/CNL options to all MSN students and the new CNL's that I know are all seasoned and experienced nurses who wanted to pursue a graduate degree.
    The CNL's in our hospital take on many patients and help manage them by assisting the RN's and offering expertise and advanced knowledge. They are a great resource for new RN's and are nurses we can go to for help or guidance. The best CNL's, in my opinion, are good teachers AND good clinicians.
  12. by   traumaRUs
    Sorry Charlsie, I wasn't clear. MVanz helped me out - thank you.

    I did an MSN first with a concentration in management and leadership. THEN, I did a post-MSN adult health CNS.

    SOrry for the confusion.

    The CNL program here is also a generalist MSN. It is still in its infancy and hasn't started yet so am unsure whether it will be an entry level MSN RN or for experienced RNs.
  13. by   core0
    Quote from Cardiac-RN
    Thank you David, but the clinical nurse leader program is an entry-level to practice one that prepares unlicensed persons to sit for the NCLEX and then be generalists, and I am already a licensed RN.

    Anyways, after discussing the situation more at length with my advisor, I have decided to remain in my education track and pursue a certificate afterwards. Thanks to all who gave input!

    Cardiac-RN, BSN, PCCN
    Sorry, I grabbed the first google that was up there. I did not realize that there were any direct entry CNL programs out there. It really doesn't make any sense to me since the CNL is supposed to build on clinical nursing experience.

    Here is a link from the University of Rochester which I believe was one of the first programs out there:
    http://www.son.rochester.edu/son/pro...l-nurse-leader

    Notice as part of the admissions is three years of experience as an RN in a clinical setting. I pointed this out as a MSN program that was not divorced from clinical nursing.

    I find this development very interesting as a true development of nursing. With deference to the members of this board NP practice is as much medical model as nursing. The other MSN concentrations are administration and education. The CNS used to assume many of the roles mentioned in the CNL. However in many places they have merged with the NP role.

    Many RNs are doing the roles mentioned in the CNL without the MSN. Given how new the degree is, it is unclear how it will be utilized and what advantage the MSN will give. Just like any other MSN it will allow the student to move to the NP with a post-masters certificate. Just a thought.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  14. by   sirI
    CNL from the AACN:

    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/CNL/

close