Critical care NP programs vs. regular NP programs... - page 2

I've been contemplating going back and getting my NP (peds). For a long time I was only interested in the critical care programs (Duke, Vanderbilt, Rush and Penn) because that's my interest... Read More

  1. by   core0
    Quote from patrick1rn
    Ive been reading alot of your comments, how do you know so much about the DNP program or other advanced nursing programs... Did you work as a RN with a Masters degree as a CNS or a NP before you went to physican assistant school ?
    I'm assuming this is pointed at me?

    I think that I have posted this before. I am working on a PhD in Healthcare policy. A lot of my research is on delivery of healthcare by NPPs. I have a long interest in nursing and originally intended to be an NNP. My exposure to nursing theory derailed that. I have kept up with the NP field.

    I am past president of both a PA specialty organization and a state chapter. In that capacity it pays to know about NPs for two reasons. NPs and PAs have some common interests in state legislation, especially in how rural health care clinics are run. The second involves unintended consequences in attempts by nursing or medicine to change APN practice acts (hint look at the opt out issue for CRNAs). I have done some work in specialty certification of physician assistants.

    I also do expert witness work regarding PA practice and serve on a "mid-level" credentialing committee for a large healthcare organization. In this area I get exposed to a lot of national issues that affect NPs (and to some extent PAs) in regards to credentialling.

    Finally I am interested in educational program design for NPPs as part of my PhD and because I intend to move into education eventually. I am interested to see how the DNP plays out (obviously I have my own ideas). The practice doctorate is now being discussed in PA educational circles, however more in the area of educator training.

    Hope this answers your questions.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  2. by   NeuroMedic
    I went through Vanderbilt's Emergency Nurse Practitioner program in which I received both A.C.N.P. & F.N.P. I feel that this training adequately prepared me for critical care environment. However, I began as a critical care paramedic, went on to receive my RN, A.A.S.; afterwhich, I progressed through B.S.N., and took a 10th Floor Trauma ICU position at Vanderbilt during which time I was working on my M.S.N.

    My biggest worry is the fact that most programs now in advanced practice nursing are allowing person(s) with absolutely NO nursing background to attend.

    In summation, I believe that it is not the actual training received; as we all take the same boards, rather the experience gained. Would you really expect an individual with a Baccalaureate in a non-science field to make it through an MSN program and do well in a critical care environment?
  3. by   Ventjock
    Trauma and Surgical Critical Care Fellowship for Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners

    www.slhhn.org/body.cfm?id=966

    thought it would be of interest to some posters
  4. by   Dreamer-RN
    ventjock,

    Thanks for the URL. That residency appears to offer some good opportunities, given my interests as a future ACNP.
  5. by   core0
    Quote from tbd75
    ventjock,

    Thanks for the URL. That residency appears to offer some good opportunities, given my interests as a future ACNP.
    Here is a thread on the PA forum that has more information:
    http://www.physicianassistantforum.c...ad.php?t=10088

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  6. by   Cinqly
    Quote from NeuroMedic
    I went through Vanderbilt's Emergency Nurse Practitioner program in which I received both A.C.N.P. & F.N.P. I feel that this training adequately prepared me for critical care environment.
    I was just discussing the idea of double majoring in these two majors, as the training is almost identical save clinical experience. I love the idea that there is a specialization in acute care that allows one to practice as a nurse practitioner, but I wonder if it limits your ability to workout outside of the critical care unit. (I apologize in advance for my ignorance on this topic...I am trying to learn!)

    Do you think having majored in both gives you an edge as far as the job market? Was the extra time and expense worth the effort? Lastly, what if you get ACNP certification and a few years from now decide you'd rather move out of the hospital setting...what options are there? Is that where the FNP would come into play? If I am going to far off topic I apologize, and please PM me instead!

    Oh, and one more thing: Does anyone know of any other programs that combine the two majors (without the cost of private schooling.....). Or do you think you could just double major at most schools?

    Thank you in advance!!
    Last edit by Cinqly on Dec 26, '07 : Reason: Forgot something!
  7. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from cinqly
    I was just discussing the idea of double majoring in these two majors, as the training is almost identical save clinical experience. I love the idea that there is a specialization in acute care that allows one to practice as a nurse practitioner, but I wonder if it limits your ability to workout outside of the critical care unit. (I apologize in advance for my ignorance on this topic...I am trying to learn!)

    Do you think having majored in both gives you an edge as far as the job market? Was the extra time and expense worth the effort? Lastly, what if you get ACNP certification and a few years from now decide you'd rather move out of the hospital setting...what options are there? Is that where the FNP would come into play? If I am going to far off topic I apologize, and please PM me instead!

    Oh, and one more thing: Does anyone know of any other programs that combine the two majors (without the cost of private schooling.....). Or do you think you could just double major at most schools?

    Thank you in advance!!
    Acute care NP's are not limited to working in critical care units only. Many work as hospitalists as well as in specialty practice. Some work in clinics in addition to hospital duties. Some have primary care training in Internal Medicine during their program and can work in that environment as well.

    Majoring in both ACNP and FNP in my opinion, increases your marketability and your chance of finding employment. However, the usual route to go about majoring in both is to do a post-master's certificate in one or the other, depending on which track you finished first.

    The Vanderbilt program of combining ACNP and FNP is unique as traditionally, universities have separate tracks for FNP and ACNP. That is not to say that there may be other programs that are similar. It's a matter of doing your own research for a similar program and hopefully, finding another one.

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