competency as a APN

  1. 0
    Hello. I am in a MSN-FNP program. We have been drilled over and over on the core competencies of APN's: direct clinical practice, expert coaching and guidance, consultation, research, clinical and professional leadership, collaboration and ethical decision making. I am sure you have heard of these concepts before.
    My question is this. I am still in the program. However, I have been asked my the nurse educator at my hospital where I work as an RN, to make an educational presentation for the unit on PD after I saw some other RN's teaching each other the incorrect techniques of the procedure. The educator asked me to present the topic because I am competent in it and it will apply towards a clinical ladder at my RN job. I also figured this falls into the direct clinical practice and expert coaching and guidance categories. This is not going to count for any credit for my MSN program, but I was wondering when I put my name on the presentation, is it acceptable to follow it by, MSN candidate? If I put MSN candidate, I figured I could place it in a portfolio for the future when I am job hunting for a NP position. Or should I only put BSN since that is my offical licensed credential at this moment? Any input would be appreciated.
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  5. 1
    I would put BSN on it simply because that is what you are. I've only heard of PhD candidates, never MSN>

    Sounds very interesting though and I would definitely include it in my portfolio for once you get out of school. Good luck.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from KatieRN04
    Hello. I am in a MSN-FNP program. We have been drilled over and over on the core competencies of APN's: direct clinical practice, expert coaching and guidance, consultation, research, clinical and professional leadership, collaboration and ethical decision making. I am sure you have heard of these concepts before.
    My question is this. I am still in the program. However, I have been asked my the nurse educator at my hospital where I work as an RN, to make an educational presentation for the unit on PD after I saw some other RN's teaching each other the incorrect techniques of the procedure. The educator asked me to present the topic because I am competent in it and it will apply towards a clinical ladder at my RN job. I also figured this falls into the direct clinical practice and expert coaching and guidance categories. This is not going to count for any credit for my MSN program, but I was wondering when I put my name on the presentation, is it acceptable to follow it by, MSN candidate? If I put MSN candidate, I figured I could place it in a portfolio for the future when I am job hunting for a NP position. Or should I only put BSN since that is my offical licensed credential at this moment? Any input would be appreciated.
    I've never seen MSNc or MSN candidate used either. But I've seen some use NP-S or FNP-S to denote nurse practitioner student status. Maybe you can use that instead.
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    thanks for the responses
  8. 1
    If it is anything like our ethical standards for clinical psych, we are not allowed to write, "Doctoral Candidate/Ph.D Candidate/Psy.D Candidate" or any form thereof in our title because you are only allowed to put earned degrees in your title. The "student" aspect should be explained elsewhere like on your CV or during the presentation.

    I can put Therapist4Chge, M.S. because I have been granted a Masters, but I cannot put "Doctoral Candidate" after it/below it. Don't get me wrong....people do, but you most likely won't see it at a conference or in publication because it would look unprofessional.

    The reasoning behind this is not only misrepresentation, but also because each degree is earned. I am surprised to hear about the NP-S, as that can be quite misleading because it looks like a formal granted credential.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.


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