Clinical Difference between NP/DNP and MD...

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    Alright folks,

    I know that this is a hot topic and required another thread. So here it is. For the practicing NP's/DNP's - do you really feel that your training has prepared you be an (almost) independent practitioner? Are some posters right that NP's can never replace primary care (or work alongside acute care) practitioners? Or, do you feel that you can compete with (and occasionally collaborate with) your MD/DO peers? Are you making what you are worth? Who is better at offering high quality,cost effective primary care?

    What's the general consensus?

    CrazyPremed (maybe CrazyPreNP)
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  3. 1 Comments so far...

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    Quote from CrazyPremed
    do you really feel that your training has prepared you be an (almost) independent practitioner?
    In New Mexico, where I live, NPs can be completely independent. No MD/DO collaboration required. Surprisingly, since this state of affairs has existed, the medical profession as a whole in NM has not collapsed in chaos and ruin.

    In this day and age where primary care providers primarily (pun intended) serve as care coordinators, referring patients to various and sundry specialists as the case requires, I can't possibly imagine why anyone would feel a NP could not be an affordable, effective primary care provider. My current primary care provider (a DO) does very little for me, medically, beyond prescribing antibiotics for my sinus infection or diagnosing my husband's plantar fasciitis. Anything beyond these routine ailments, he refers to a specialist. He even referred me to a specialist for my acid reflux problem. Who could credibly argue that any competent NP couldn't provide this level of care? (And great NPs provide a much higher level of care than this, which is why I'm now shopping around for a great NP to be my primary care "doctor.")

    As far as NPs "earning what they're worth," I can't comment because I am not yet an NP.


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