California NP working as staff RN

  1. 0
    Hi everyone!

    I saw that this topic has been discussed at least once before, but I still have a couple questions.

    I am a newly graduated FNP. Most of my experience is in Neurotrauma ICU. I'm planning on moving to SF to work as a staff RN full-time, while looking for a NP job. My plan is to work full-time as an RN and part-time as an NP (or vice versa if the right NP job comes along).

    For California NPs out there, is this legally possible? I could not find much info about this on the Board's website. From reading other posts, I understand that working as an RN after being licensed as an NP means that you will be held to the highest level of education/licensure you have. I understand that part, but I want to know if any licensed NPs on here work as a bedside RN in California.

    I haven't applied for my NP license yet because I'm nervous that once I get it, I will not be able to apply for RNs jobs in CA. I just want to make sure that having an NP license will not interfere with me obtaining a job as a bedside RN. While I like being an NP, I know I will miss being at the bedside and want to keep my skills up-to-date.

    Thanks in advance.
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  4. 4 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I can tell you for a fact that in some of the ICU's we round in at work, there are nurses working at the bedside as RN's and not APN's yet are certified as FNP's and ANP's as well as CNS. The hospital I work for embraces it. California's BRN feels that NP's do not have a higher scope of practice than a regular RN even after certification until they are engaged in a practice with Standardized Procedures and an active Furnishing License. There is no independent practice for NP's and until a Standardized Procedure is in place, the NP can't provide advanced practice services.
  6. 0
    I am a new RN in California and have come across multiple certified NP's working at the bedside as RN's -- both during nursing school and again when I started my new job. Some had practiced as NP's and decided to return, others couldn't find the type of jobs they were hoping for. We even had a traveler nurse come work a few months on our unit who was an NP, but also likes to travel with her husband during the Summer months and do bedside nursing to keep skills up!

    Doesn't seem to be a problem within the large CA hospitals from what I've observed. I have not heard anything about it being an additional liability...

    Good luck.
  7. 0
    Another reason is pay. In many instances, RN and NP pay in some parts of California are not much different. NP's who practice in salaried office settings and work long hours actually end up making less than RN's who work 3 twelve hours shifts.

    It's very attractive to work as an RN in California - the unions are strong and the mandatory staffing ratios make the job a bit easier. I would have to say though that being an NP offers an entirely different skill set than being an RN and once one commits to being an NP, the RN skill set is no longer necessary to keep up.

    And just to add, area hospitals applying for magnet status actually flaunt the number of bedside nurses with master's degrees as an indication of high educational level for its staff nurses.
  8. 0
    Another reason is pay. In many instances, RN and NP pay in some parts of California are not much different. NP's who practice in salaried office settings and work long hours actually end up making less than RN's who work 3 twelve hours shifts.

    Sad but true here in Texas, too.


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