Benefits

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    Just accepted a position with a community hospital setting. I will be a "pioneer" NP in their organization. Unfortunately I do not feel that their HR department is up to par on their salary and benefit offerings. I came from a solo practice provider where there were no policy or procedure in place. They have classified my position under nursing and I will be receiving the same be fits as all other nursing personnel. I was able to successfully negotiate an equitable salary but fell their "benefits" otherwise are lacking recognition of advanced degree. Are there any other PAs/NPs out there that work for organizations that have some input about their vacation, PTO, sick and/or holiday pay- even continuing Ed expenses, certification , etcAny advice or input would be helpful.
  2. 3 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from leahvonleah
    Just accepted a position with a community hospital setting. I will be a "pioneer" NP in their organization. Unfortunately I do not feel that their HR department is up to par on their salary and benefit offerings. I came from a solo practice provider where there were no policy or procedure in place. They have classified my position under nursing and I will be receiving the same be fits as all other nursing personnel. I was able to successfully negotiate an equitable salary but fell their "benefits" otherwise are lacking recognition of advanced degree. Are there any other PAs/NPs out there that work for organizations that have some input about their vacation, PTO, sick and/or holiday pay- even continuing Ed expenses, certification , etcAny advice or input would be helpful.
    We have PTO which is combination vacation/sick time. All employees get the same amount based on years of service. We get Certification and licensing covered. We also get $2000 and 40 hours of time for CME.
  4. 0
    I work for a hospital system and the NPPs have a mix of the same benefits for hospital staff, nursing, and physicians. Our PTO, medical/dental/etc. insurances, discounts at area businesses and such is the same as all hospital employees. We do have CME (paid at $1000 less than the physicians receive), paid malpractice insurance (I have my own coverage in addition, though), fees paid to the state to register our collaborating physicians, etc. Renewing my DEA or other licenses/certificates must come out of my CME funds, which is not great.

    There is definitely a hierarchy amongst providers, which is awkward but that's the way the physicians want it, so I don't see that changing. For instance, the docs have a lounge with big-screen TVs and a chef available so if they're seeing patients at an odd time of day, they can still get a meal prepared. The NPPs have a lounge that is rarely cleaned and includes a bunch of high-carb snacks we can access 24/7.
  5. 0
    I work for a university hospital where the NP's and PA's either fall into salaried or hourly positions. I work with a group who gets paid hourly and our benefits are similar to nursing. The hospital has a strong union and we feel that the union benefits from CNA (California Nurses Association) helps us get better pay in terms of our base salary, overtime, and differential pay for off shifts and weekends. We have PTO (minimum of 3 weeks per year which accrues), 13 holidays annually, and 12 sick days annually. Our DEA dues are waived as state employees. We have university pension in addition to 403B. CME's are available through the School of Medicine but we can ask for reimbursement for courses taken outside the campus.

    Previously, I worked for a large tertiary hospital not attached to a university. Our benefits were similar to management employees but not quite the same as physicians: premium parking, premium health care insurance, hospital paid Blackberry smartphones, CME allowance in the form of an annual debit card, one month annual vacation, one month worth of sick days.


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