Anyone heard you are going to need ACNP to work in hospitals?? Help! - page 2

hi everyone. currently i'm an adult health cns working in a large nephrology practice with three fnps. part of our job is to spend the weekends doing hospital call where we do consults, h&ps,... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    14gaugeIV - thanks too. When I do hospital rounds, I write a note (on patients that my MDs in my practice have admitted) and then I do consults too - I gather all the info, get a general game plan and call the MD that I'm on call with and together we do what is necessary. I do write orders under my own name and they do eventually need to be signed off by an MD, there is no 24 hour limit that I am aware of. Like you, I've only been licensed since July 06 and I'm pretty cautious.

    Thanks again everyone...
  2. by   gauge14iv
    core0 - what you stated is not controversial - it is TRUE!

    How wonderful when "outsiders" observations of our profession substantiate what many of us say all the time.

    It all boils down to the fact that nursing as a profession as a whole can't agree on anything - there is no cohesion/agreement anywhere within it it and that doesn't really change at the NP level. If we ever agreed on anything, we would truly be the 20 ton political gorilla. It's a true shame honestly.
  3. by   traumaRUs
    I agree with you too gauge14IV - if we as nurses could stand together, we would be a major force.
  4. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from traumarus
    [font=book antiqua]hi everyone. currently i'm an adult health cns working in a large nephrology practice with three fnps. part of our job is to spend the weekends doing hospital call where we do consults, h&ps, discharged summaries and generally seeing patients. i am now hearing that in order to work in the hospitals, you will need an acnp versus the fnp that my peers have. has anyone else heard this and can you please refer me to a source? also, i live in il and is this going to be state specific? thanks in advance for any assistance - i really appreciate it.
    interesting! haven't heard of this in my neck of the woods but if this ends up to be true in michigan, our hospitals will be in big trouble. with only 2 existing acnp programs in the state and little interest in the acnp field, many of our hospital-based np's are not even acnp-trained. can't see this happening here. lots of physicians who love their np's will protest!
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Thanks everyone. I'm beginning to think this is some weird urban legend. Thanks again for the info.
  6. by   maikranz
    Greetings, all. I have heard that completion of a course such as this will be required for practice in an acute care facility.
    the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Fundamental Critical Care Support Course (FCCS) is designed for both instructors and providers. FCCS is a standardized course, providing an approach to initial management (first 24 hours) of the critically ill patient for the non-intensivist. The course offers both classroom and "hands on " interactive instruction, especially care related to mechanical ventilation, hemodynamic monitoring, organ hypoperfusion and neurological support.

    Course Purpose
    To better prepare the non-intensivist for the first 24 hours of management of the critically ill patient until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.
    To assist the non-intensivist in dealing with sudden deterioration of the critically ill patient.
    To prepare house staff for ICU coverage.
    To prepare nurses and other critical care practitioners to deal with acute deterioration in the critically ill patient.

    Course Objectives
    Prioritize assessment needs for the critically ill patient.
    Select appropriate diagnostic tests.
    Identify and respond to significant changes in the unstable patient.
    Recognize and initiate management of acute life-threatening conditions.
    Determine the need for expert consultation and/or patient transfer and prepare the practitioner for optimally accomplishing transfer.

    Specific topics include:
    Airway management
    Cardiopulmonary/ cerebral resuscitation
    Acute respiratory failure
    Mechanical ventilation
    Basic hemodynamic monitoring
    Diagnosis and management of shock

    Additional content includes:
    Neurologic support
    Trauma and burn management
    Acute coronary syndromes
    Life-threatening infections
    Electrolyte and metabolic disturbances

    Skills stations include:
    Airway management
    Vascular access
    Mechanical ventilation
    Trauma
    Defibrillation/transcutaneous pacing/pericardiocentesis
  7. by   traumaRUs
    Hi there and thanks for the info - where is this course offered and how long is it??? What's it called too? Thanks again.
  8. by   juan de la cruz
    Maikranz, I am not aware of a requirement for completion of the FCCS course pior to working in an acute care setting. Can you explain this further? Is this something required of NP's somewhere that you are aware of? I personally have an FCCS certificate but I took the course after I was hired in an ICU setting as an NP. The course was paid for by my employer and is actually offered at the hospital I work in. The course would be of benefit to NP's who work primarily in adult ICU settings (there is limited pediatric content in the course). It is also a course in basic ICU patient management so it can not be used in place of formal training in ICU management similar to a critical care NP program, for instance. I also do not see a need to require it for EVERY NP that works in an acute care setting.
  9. by   core0
    Quote from maikranz
    Greetings, all. I have heard that completion of a course such as this will be required for practice in an acute care facility.
    Where did you here that this will be required? Looks like overkill for most inpatient specialties.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  10. by   gauge14iv
    See - even the things I do in the hospital - don't include ANY of that stuff. All that stuff would definately be outside my scope of practice as an FNP without training in those things.

    Frankly - I probably wouldn't bother because I wouldn't use any of it anyway.

    I work for a family physician who admits his own hospital patients, but who also does not do these things in the hospital - if a patient requires ICU care, he goes to the ICU and the intensivist or specialist manages the patient. The specialist then generally stays on the case until discharge.
  11. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Hi there and thanks for the info - where is this course offered and how long is it??? What's it called too? Thanks again.
    TraumaRUs, it is very similar in format to TNCC and ENPC if you remember that from our staff ER nurse days. It is a 2-day course. If you are interested in it, check the Society of Critical Care Medicine website for course locations and schedules.
  12. by   traumaRUs
    Thanks PinoyNP - that explains a lot. I too wouldn't use that. We aren't even required to have ACLS and the other NPs that I work with have never worked in hospitals - only outpatient facilities.
  13. by   maikranz
    Quote from pinoyNP
    TraumaRUs, it is very similar in format to TNCC and ENPC if you remember that from our staff ER nurse days. It is a 2-day course. If you are interested in it, check the Society of Critical Care Medicine website for course locations and schedules.
    Hello, I've been at work! :spin: I think you're right, pinoy. I had heard about it at a continuing ed program I'd attended and thought that it might be worthwhile if I ever chose to work with someone who required me to take call :trout: . I decided against it for myself, but put it out on the forum for y'all to see. I looked back at my 1st post and mea culpa, please change "will" to "may".
    Last edit by maikranz on Mar 10, '07

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