Anyone heard of any NP to MD programs? - page 8

A girl I go to school with said that there is a school in Missouri that has a bridge program for NPs to become MDs. Have any of you heard of a program like this?? :confused: Thanks! Kitty... Read More

  1. by   arnp in iowa
    honestly, why would any NP want to become a MD? granted it depends on which state you practice in, but if selected carefully, there are no limits on what your practice can encompass. i see patients, treat, and have NO collaborating or supervising person. ours is a collaborative process which can be via referrals (which I choose to use PRN) and i am very happy in my roles. MD? pah.
    and btw no i do NOT use my textbooks any more than any physician/PA/chiro/pharmacists.
  2. by   arnp in iowa
    Quote from cgfnp
    You're kidding me?!?! This is going to raise all kinds of hell. The training isn't even close to the same. I suppose once residency is over it doesn't matter but I guarantee the nursing PhDs are going to be looking a whole lot of stuff up during residency if this actually happens.


    honestly, why would any NP want to become a MD? granted it depends on which state you practice in, but if selected carefully, there are no limits on what your practice can encompass. i see patients, treat, and have NO collaborating or supervising person. ours is a collaborative process which can be via referrals (which I choose to use PRN) and i am very happy in my roles. MD? pah.
    and btw no i do NOT use my textbooks any more than any physician/PA/chiro/pharmacists.
  3. by   baburton
    No, I have not heard of an NP to MD program. And why would we want that? We need to remember nursing is not the same as medicine. Nursing is not only a science, but an Art. The care of the patient as a whole being is unique to our profession. Our advocacy is crucial to their wellness. I encourage you to embrace nursing for the powerful changes we make in the lives of all who receive our care.

    A DNP program is a nursing clinical focus. A PhD is geared towards scholarship, research, teaching, writing....etc.
    A nursing school can not give out the degree of "doctor of medicine" only "doctor of nursing practice" and "doctor of philosophy in nursing science"

    Nurses make up the largest healthcare profession, we must stay united and embrace what we do as vital to society. We are just as vital as a medical doctor in the care of patients. I would suggest you sit down and think about what we really do and come up with your own definition of nursing. There are many.

    I know so many who revel in the "glamor" that they perceive of medical doctors. My partner is a doctor, and he continues to find people’s perception of doctors as "hilarious." He works very hard treating and diagnosing patients and then leaves the rest to nurses and other professionals. We are a team with a unified goal.

    A wise nurse once told our class many years ago, “people come to the hospital for nurses, people can see a doctor in their office or an urgent care.”

    But in the end, if you'd rather be a doctor, go for it! Don't try to take a short cut! I don't want a doctor, nor a nurse, whose degree came too quickly.


    Jacques, R.N., NP student
    Washington, D.C.
    Last edit by baburton on Jul 13, '10 : Reason: info
  4. by   mkjfnp
    Quote from lalaxton
    You are probably thinking of the DNS or Doctor of Nursing Science program that will give you the title of "Dr." but you will not be an MD or Dr. of medicine. It is more of a clinical doctorate but there is no other way to be an MD than to go to med school.

    There is also the DNP which is Dr of Nursing Practice which gives you the title of Dr. But alas if you want MD or DO behind your name, Medical school it is.
    Last edit by mkjfnp on Jul 31, '10 : Reason: forgot a word
  5. by   nursep2b
    I agree with baburton. Our family MD leads anything but a glamorous life. He has a small rural clinic, gets up early to make hospital rounds, sees the same old thing in his office every day, listens to the same old complaints, and gets up the next day to do it all again. Not really a lot of glory in that. He has a wife and a house full of kids to support, drives old vehicles, he can't even afford to hire a full time office nurse. Yes, he is a medical doctor, and he should be admired for the sacrifice and hard work it took to get through it all, but he is just a regular Joe at the end of the day. I personally think the role of NP would offer more benefit than MD.
  6. by   Ellen NP
    (Originally Posted by veritas that's in USA. what i said is actually happening in Oz. wow, USA has a med school admission rate of 44% to 50%? amazing. must be real easy to get into med schools in USA. in Oz, it's 20%. and in many places in the world, the program is still 8 years. in uk, it is usually 5 or 6 years.)

    Some of those countries don't require an undergraduate education before applying to med school. You apply to med school after the equivalent of high school, then spend approx 8 years in school. It's not 4 years of undergrad + 8 years of med school.
    Last edit by Ellen NP on Aug 3, '10 : Reason: include quote

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