Anyone heard of any NP to MD programs? - page 6

A girl I go to school with said that there is a school in Missouri that has a bridge program for NPs to become MDs. Have any of you heard of a program like this?? :confused: Thanks! Kitty... Read More

  1. by   cgfnp
    [quote=n_g;2434149]
    Quote from cgfnp

    Good for you for wanting to live rurally. However, your average person doesn't, including MD's, NP's, etc.
    Not so much that anyone wants to. We'd just rather live rural and independent than urban and not. Lesser of two evils. Doesn't really matter to me personally, as after 3 yrs out of school, I already hate it so much that I make a daily attempt to find another way to make six figures as far away from healthcare as I can get. Come on powerball....
  2. by   ILoveIceCream
    What do you hate about it?
  3. by   cgfnp
    Quote from ILoveIceCream
    What do you hate about it?
    Everything. The call, the pay, the lack of administration, the patients constantly bothering you for more and more, the drug seeking tax-dollar slugs on welfare and medicaid, the movement toward government run socialization of medicine, the ones who are too good to get on the phone and consult with someone that wasn't part of their fraternity in school. I'm just going to find where the best reimbursement is in medicine right now, and explode in it and make enough money to invest in other venture enough to get out of medicine altogether. I'd rather run a backhoe than do this crap.
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 6, '07 : Reason: TOS
  4. by   core0
    Quote from cgfnp
    Everything. The call, the pay, the lack of administration, the patients constantly bothering you for more and more, the drug seeking tax-dollar slugs on welfare and medicaid, the movement toward government run socialization of medicine, the ones who are too good to get on the phone and consult with someone that wasn't part of their fraternity in school. I'm just going to find where the best reimbursement is in medicine right now, and explode in it and make enough money to invest in other venture enough to get out of medicine altogether. I'd rather run a backhoe than do this crap.
    And you think that is all going to disappear when you move to a rural area? Having done many of my rotations in Appalachia I can tell you it is much worse. It is not only not having your calls not returned but having the nearest specialist 200 miles away. Its having patients hit you up for refills in the grocery store. Its knowing that those drug seekers are your neighbor and you can't fire them because you are the only game in town. Its having the patients know where your house is so they can drop by if they have a problem. Its trying to run a clinic without reliable phone or internet service.

    The problems don't disappear when you are in rural America, they just become different.

    We are wandering off topic. There is an independent nurse practice thread or someone could start a new thread.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 6, '07 : Reason: quoted edited post
  5. by   ILoveIceCream
    Quote from cgfnp
    Everything. The call, the pay, the lack of administration, the patients constantly bothering you for more and more, the drug seeking tax-dollar slugs on welfare and medicaid, the movement toward government run socialization of medicine, the ones who are too good to get on the phone and consult with someone that wasn't part of their fraternity in school. I'm just going to find where the best reimbursement is in medicine right now, and explode in it and make enough money to invest in other venture enough to get out of medicine altogether. I'd rather run a backhoe than do this crap.
    Are you working in primary care?
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 6, '07 : Reason: quoted edited post
  6. by   veritas
    Quote from core0
    I think that you need to check your facts. 44% of med school applicants get in. It is over 50% if you discount re-applicants....
    David Carpenter, PA-C
    that's in USA. what i said is actually happening in Oz. wow, USA has a med school admission rate of 44% to 50%? amazing. must be real easy to get into med schools in USA. in Oz, it's 20%. and in many places in the world, the program is still 8 years. in uk, it is usually 5 or 6 years.
    Last edit by veritas on Oct 6, '07
  7. by   CraigB-RN
    Quote from veritas
    that's in USA. what i said is actually happening in Oz. wow, USA has a med school admission rate of 44% to 50%? amazing. must be real easy to get into med schools in USA. in Oz, it's 20%. and in many places in the world, the program is still 8 years. in uk, it is usually 5 or 6 years.
    If you want to get technical Med schools here in the US are 8 years if you count the undergrad degree, then there is the residency part. I"m sitting here looking at the OZ rules and am getting confused over the awarding of degrees. It looks to me that things are basicly the same, just packaged in a different wrapper.

    http://www.medical-colleges.net/medical.htm I know it's not a scholarly paper or site, but here it is.
  8. by   core0
    Quote from veritas
    that's in USA. what i said is actually happening in Oz. wow, USA has a med school admission rate of 44% to 50%? amazing. must be real easy to get into med schools in USA. in Oz, it's 20%. and in many places in the world, the program is still 8 years. in uk, it is usually 5 or 6 years.
    Completely different system. There are a few people that go to Ireland or Eastern Europe to shave 1-2 years off of medical school. The US system counts only post graduate education.

    As far as being competitive the Osteopathic schools had an overall GPA of 3.4 and MCATs of 24 for those accepted. For Allopathic schools it was 3.6 and 30. That puts average GPA in the top 15% of all college grads. Still pretty competitive. I am willing to bet that there is more self selection here and the ones that are not competitive go overseas.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  9. by   cgfnp
    Quote from core0
    And you think that is all going to disappear when you move to a rural area? Having done many of my rotations in Appalachia I can tell you it is much worse. It is not only not having your calls not returned but having the nearest specialist 200 miles away. Its having patients hit you up for refills in the grocery store. Its knowing that those drug seekers are your neighbor and you can't fire them because you are the only game in town. Its having the patients know where your house is so they can drop by if they have a problem. Its trying to run a clinic without reliable phone or internet service.

    The problems don't disappear when you are in rural America, they just become different.

    We are wandering off topic. There is an independent nurse practice thread or someone could start a new thread.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    I work in one of the most rural places in America. Yes I know what it's like. I don't rotate there. I work there. Once again, I think it would be better to put up with the rural %$& independently than be in a urban setting without autonomy.

    Isn't really off topic either, as autonomy and independence has everything to do with NP to MD programs, as that would be the driving force for most NPs doing this.
  10. by   cgfnp
    Quote from ILoveIceCream
    Are you working in primary care?
    Yep. Primary care clinic, with inpatient rounds on my admissions and 1:4 ER/LCTU/Acute call. 1:4 would be nice, but I somehow get stuck with about 40% of the call time. And I get paid the least of the 4 for the call time. I get more angry every single minute...
  11. by   tiredfeetED
    Quote from Caroline32669
    Oceania med is in Samoa and you do not need to take the MCAT if you have had medical experience. Ross University has a decent reputation and there are one or two other Carribbean schools that I can't remember the name of.
    .
    Oceania med school is a scam. Most of the courses are taught online which is not approved by any current state medical board.
    Ross, is one of the 3 medical schools in the Carribbean that is recognized by all 50 states but this school is not a bridge. Ross requires MCATS and has no advanced standing for midlevels. At this current time there is not a single school allowing advanced standing.
    DO programs tend to be more receptive towards midlevels. MD programs are more focused on grades/MCAT scores and research.
  12. by   core0
    Quote from cgfnp
    Yep. Primary care clinic, with inpatient rounds on my admissions and 1:4 ER/LCTU/Acute call. 1:4 would be nice, but I somehow get stuck with about 40% of the call time. And I get paid the least of the 4 for the call time. I get more angry every single minute...
    First point you are demonstrating that the same crappy things happen to people in rural situations as they do in urban. The second point is that you are confusing independence with a crappy work situation. Considering that in almost every state you can either become a partner in a medical practice or open your own practice independently under an LLC then what is the reason you stay and are so unhappy? Either you live in one of the few states where you can't do this and choose not to move or you have made the determination that 98% of NPs have made that risk > reward.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  13. by   veritas
    Quote from CraigB-RN
    If you want to get technical Med schools here in the US are 8 years if you count the undergrad degree, then there is the residency part. I"m sitting here looking at the OZ rules and am getting confused over the awarding of degrees. It looks to me that things are basicly the same, just packaged in a different wrapper.

    http://www.medical-colleges.net/medical.htm I know it's not a scholarly paper or site, but here it is.
    i meant becoz in US you have some programs which shave off 1 year from the 4 year post-grad program, essentially making it 3 years post grad for a med degree. there is no such thing in uk or oz or most 1st world countries. in oz and uk, even after u do a degree, no matter what it is or how much experience you have, u end up in the bottom with the rest, without exemptions. and in some countries, even if u have a prior degree, u still have to do the 8 years. so US is already providing the shortest recognised program in the world.

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