Advantages to being and FNP?

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    I'm a med/surg ICU nurse. I've been an RN for 3 years, and I think it's time for me to go back to school for an NP. I'm just not sure what area to do it in. I love critical care, but I'm not sure I want to be in the hospital setting for the rest of my life. Does anyone have any advice for me? I'm thinking of possibly doing FNP, but I'm concerned about finding a job after finishing. Is it hard to find a good job as an FNP? And will I make enough money above what I make as an RN to compensate the cost of grad school? I'd appreciate any input. Thanks!
    Jo Dirt likes this.
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  3. 11 Comments so far...

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    Good questions and good to ask before committing to a program. Much depends on your area of the country unless you are willing to relocate. Where are FNPs hired in your area? Is this what you want to do? As to salary, negotiate. When I graduated in 2006, I was offered less than what I was making as an RN with 12 years RN experience. I had to negotiate quite a bit to get what I wanted.
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    Quote from allopurinol
    I'm a med/surg ICU nurse. I've been an RN for 3 years, and I think it's time for me to go back to school for an NP. I'm just not sure what area to do it in. I love critical care, but I'm not sure I want to be in the hospital setting for the rest of my life. Does anyone have any advice for me? I'm thinking of possibly doing FNP, but I'm concerned about finding a job after finishing. Is it hard to find a good job as an FNP? And will I make enough money above what I make as an RN to compensate the cost of grad school? I'd appreciate any input. Thanks!
    I would definitely recommend that you get the FNP certification, because you will have the broadest scope of practice than any other specialty.

    I don't know where you live, but if they're hiring NP's, then they are most definitely hiring FNP's.

    Also, as far as pay goes, I've seen NP's make anywhere from $55,000 to $150,000 per year. It all depends on the specialty and the supply and demand. Although, remember there's usually a catch if someone is offering you a lot of money. I had a job like that right out of school in pain management. I made anywhere from $600 to $1,000 per day b/c I was paid "per patient". It was a mind numbing job and I felt like a drug dealer. Needless to say, my former PM boss is now in trouble with the DEA and the Board of Medicine! If it's too good to be true, then it probably is!

    I make $50/hr now, but I don't get any benefits, since I'm an independent contractor. I'm sure there are some ICU/ER nurses who are making that WITH benefits.
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    Don't flame me here for sounding too Pollyanna-ish, but I certainly think that salary isn't the only compensation. I couldnt have continued working in the hospital-- I just wouldve burned out and been miserable. Higher education affords (hopefully!) a better work environment that offers different opportunities and experiences. Of course, I wouldnt and didnt settle for less than I was making as an RN, certainly more, but I like to look at the whole picture. :redpinkhe
    BlessedOne likes this.
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    hey i def think fnp is worth it. although ihave been an RN for 8yrs in many positions and was used to "naming my own price and terms" it is different when you are a new grad NP i feel like i am starting all over again but more knowledgeable and more experienced although you may start out less than what you make as a RN w/ experience you will get what you want and need. good luck. i have really enjoyed my time as a NP student and can't wait till my exam is over on July 9 to practice as a real NP!!!
    traumaRUs likes this.
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    Definitely depends on your local market. But as a FNP your education/ training is to take care of a patients from birth to death.

    Sure I know RNs that make more than I do but they work harder and have the kind of hours I only chuckle about now.

    All is not great but when I compare notes with some of my old doctor friends they just smile at me... (ie fence and green grass).

    I don't know about other states but in Georgia APRNs are still with the medical establishment big time.

    But since I have been an NP I have not: floated, been short-staffed, called in, called off, forced to sign up to work holidays or overtime.
  9. 0
    Interesting...would it be fair to say that being an NP is less about money and more about better working conditions?

    That will be a surprise to my classmates, who want to become NPs for the former...
  10. 0
    Quote from Joe NightingMale
    Interesting...would it be fair to say that being an NP is less about money and more about better working conditions?

    That will be a surprise to my classmates, who want to become NPs for the former...

    For myself it was not all, or even most, about the money..

    I have been employed by three of the major hospitals in Georgia: I wanted out, I wanted something different, and I wanted something more...
    Funny thing is I am still employed by one of them

    It can be about working harder or working smarter.
  11. 0
    Quote from Joe NightingMale
    Interesting...would it be fair to say that being an NP is less about money and more about better working conditions?

    That will be a surprise to my classmates, who want to become NPs for the former...
    Money? (laughs out loud). If money is your goal, there are much easier ways to make a buck than by choosing this career! My friends who went into law or financial management for instance... this blows my mind, that direct-entry folks would choose NP for the money. Hopefully they also like patient care
  12. 1
    Quote from VivaRN
    Money? (laughs out loud). If money is your goal, there are much easier ways to make a buck than by choosing this career! My friends who went into law or financial management for instance... this blows my mind, that direct-entry folks would choose NP for the money. Hopefully they also like patient care
    Humor in nursing....
    VivaRN likes this.


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